Quiver Quantitative

Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - DLA

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Item 1A. Risk Factors

We operate in a rapidly changing, highly competitive business environment that involves substantial risks and uncertainties, including, but not limited to, the risks identified below. The following risks, as well as risks described elsewhere in this report or in our other filings with the SEC, could materially affect our business, financial condition or operating results and the value of Company securities held by investors and should be carefully considered in evaluating our Company and the forward-looking statements contained in this report or future reports. The risks described below are not the only risks facing Delta Apparel. Additional risks not presently known to us or that we currently do not view as material may become material and may impair our business operations. Any of these risks could cause, or contribute to causing, our actual results to differ materially from expectations.

Risks Related to our Strategy

The price and availability of purchased yarn and other raw materials is prone to significant fluctuations and volatility. Cotton is the primary raw material used in the manufacture of our apparel products. As is the case with other commodities, the price of cotton fluctuates and is affected by weather, consumer demand, speculation on the commodities market, inflation, the cost of labor and transportation, and other factors that are generally unpredictable and beyond our control. As is the case with other commodities, the price of cotton fluctuates and is affected by weather, consumer demand, speculation on the commodities market, and other factors that are generally unpredictable and beyond our control. As described under the heading “Manufacturing, Sourcing, and Distribution”, the price of yarn purchased from Parkdale, our key supplier, is based upon the cost of cotton plus a fixed conversion cost. We set future cotton prices with purchase commitments as a component of the purchase price of yarn in advance of the shipment of finished yarn from Parkdale. Prices are set according to prevailing prices, as reported by the New York Cotton Exchange, at the time we enter into the commitments. Thus, we are subject to the commodity risk of cotton prices and cotton price movements, which could result in unfavorable yarn pricing for us. In the past, the Company, and the apparel industry as a whole, has experienced periods of increased cotton costs and price volatility that we were unable to pass through to customers, with the higher costs negatively impacting the gross margins in our Activewear and other businesses by significant amounts. In the past, the Company, and the apparel industry as a whole, has experienced periods of increased cotton prices and price volatility that we were unable to pass through to our customers, with the higher cost of cotton negatively impacting the gross margins in our Activewear and other businesses by significant amounts. In addition, sudden decreases in the price of cotton and other raw materials may result in the cost of inventory exceeding the cost of new production, which may result in downward selling price pressures, negatively impacting the gross margins in our Activewear and other businesses by significant amounts. In the past, the Company, and the apparel industry as a whole, has experienced periods of increased cotton prices and price volatility that we were unable to pass through to our customers, with the higher cost of cotton negatively impacting the gross margins in our Activewear and other businesses by significant amounts.

In addition, if Parkdale’s operations are disrupted and Parkdale is not able to provide us with our yarn requirements, we may need to obtain yarn from alternative sources. We may not be able to enter into short-term arrangements with substitute suppliers on terms as favorable as our current terms with Parkdale, which could negatively affect our business. In addition, we may not be able to obtain sufficient quantities of yarn from alternative sources, which could require us to adjust manufacturing levels, negatively impacting our business and results of operations.

We also source fabric in Mexico for use in our Campeche, Mexico sew facility, purchase specialized fabrics that we currently do not have the capacity or capability to produce and may purchase other fabrics when it is cost-effective to do so. While these fabrics typically are available from various suppliers, there are times when certain yarns become limited in quantity, causing some fabrics to be difficult to source. This can result in higher prices or the inability to provide products to customers, which could negatively impact our results of operations.

Dyes and chemicals are also purchased from several third-party suppliers. While historically we have not had difficulty obtaining sufficient quantities of dyes and chemicals for manufacturing, the availability of products can change, which could require us to adjust dye and chemical formulations. In certain instances, these adjustments can increase manufacturing costs, negatively impacting our business and results of operations.

Economic conditions may adversely impact demand for our products. The apparel industry is cyclical and dependent upon the overall level of demand for soft goods, which may or may not coincide with the overall level of discretionary consumer spending. These levels of demand change as regional, domestic and international economic conditions change. These economic conditions include, but are not limited to, employment levels, energy costs, interest rates, tax rates, inflation, personal debt levels, and uncertainty about the future, with many of these factors outside of our control. Historically, during recessionary periods, the demand for casual and activewear apparel has been strong and our business has performed well. However, there can be no assurances that this correlation will continue in future recessions. Sometimes, the timing of increases or decreases in consumer purchases of soft goods can differ from the timing of increases or decreases in the overall level of economic activity. Weakening sales may require us to reduce manufacturing operations to match our output to demand or expected demand. Reductions in our manufacturing operations may increase unit costs and lower our gross margins, causing a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

The apparel industry is highly competitive, and we face significant competitive threats to our business. The market for athletic and activewear apparel and the related accessory and other items we provide is highly competitive and includes many new competitors as well as increased competition from established companies, some of which are larger or more diversified and may have greater financial resources. Many of our competitors have larger sales forces, stronger brand recognition among consumers, bigger advertising budgets, and greater economies of scale. We compete with these companies primarily on the basis of price, quality, service and brand recognition, all of which are important competitive factors in the apparel industry. Our ability to maintain our competitive edge depends upon these factors, as well as our ability to deliver new products at the best value for the customer, maintain positive brand recognition, and obtain sufficient retail floor space and effective product presentation at retail. If we are unable to compete successfully with our competitors, our business and results of operations will be adversely affected.

Our success depends, in part, on our ability to predict or effectively react to changing consumer preferences and trends. The success of our businesses depends on our ability to anticipate and respond quickly to changing consumer demand and preferences in apparel and other items we provide. We believe that our brands are recognized by consumers across many demographics and geographies. The popularity for particular products can change significantly from year-to-year based on prevailing fashion trends (particularly in our lifestyle businesses) and on other factors and, accordingly, our ability to adapt to fashion trends in designing products is important to the success of our brands. If we are unable to quickly adapt to changes in consumer preferences in the design of products, our results of operations could be adversely affected. Moreover, because we and our customers project demand for our products based on estimated sales and fashion trends, the actual demand for our products sometimes falls short of what was projected. This can lead to higher inventory levels than desired. Excess inventory levels increase our working capital needs, and sometimes excess inventory must be sold at discounted prices, all of which could have an adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our strategy to grow our direct-to-consumer retail business depends upon our ability to successfully open and operate new stores in a timely and cost-effective manner. Our strategy to grow our “brick and mortar” retail footprint depends on many factors including, among others, our ability to: identify desirable store locations; negotiate acceptable lease terms; hire, train and retain a growing workforce of store managers, sales associates and other personnel; successfully integrate new stores into our existing control structure and operations, including our information technology systems; and coordinate well with our digital platforms and wholesale customers to minimize the competition within our sales channels.

If we expand into new geographic areas, we will need to successfully identify and satisfy the consumer preferences in these areas. In addition, we will need to address competitive, merchandising, marketing, distribution and other challenges encountered in connection with any expansion. Finally, we cannot ensure that any newly-opened stores will be received as well as, or achieve net sales or profitability levels comparable to those of, our existing stores in our estimated time periods, or at all. If our stores fail to achieve, or are unable to sustain, acceptable net sales and profitability levels, our business overall may be materially harmed and we may incur significant costs associated with closing or relocating stores.

Risks Related to our Operations

The COVID-19 pandemic has had, and could continue to have, a material adverse effect our ability to operate, results of operations, financial condition, liquidity, and capital investments. The COVID-19 pandemic has had an adverse effect and could continue to adversely affect our performance, results of operations, our financial condition, liquidity, and capital investments. Several public health organizations have recommended, and numerous local and foreign governments have implemented, certain measures to slow and limit the transmission of the virus, including shelter in place and social distancing ordinances. Several public health organizations have recommended, and some local and foreign governments have implemented, certain measures to slow and limit the transmission of the virus, including shelter in place and social distancing ordinances. Such preventive measures, or others we may voluntarily put in place, may have a material adverse effect on our business for an indefinite period of time, such as the potential shutdown of certain locations, decreased employee availability, potential border closures, reduced customer traffic, modified hours and operations, and others. In mid-March 2020, all of our branded retail locations were temporarily closed in compliance with guidelines for retail store operations and were re-opened by the end of May 2020. Our manufacturing facilities in El Salvador and Honduras were also temporarily closed in mid-March 2020 through late June 2020 due to the government-mandated country shutdowns and we experienced intermittent closures during the June 2020 quarter at our manufacturing facilities in Mexico and North Carolina. In mid-March 2020, all of our branded retail locations were temporarily closed in compliance with guidelines for retail store operations and were re-opened by the end of May 2020. Our manufacturing facilities in El Salvador and Honduras were temporarily closed in mid-March through late June due to the government-mandated country shutdowns, in addition to intermittent closures during the June quarter at our manufacturing facilities in Mexico and North Carolina. If our retail stores and manufacturing plants are closed in the future, it could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition. Energy, fuel and related costs are prone to significant fluctuations and volatility, which could adversely affect our results of operations.

Many of our customers and suppliers also face these and other challenges, which could lead to reduced demand for our products and services, could impair our customers' ability to pay all or portion of the amounts owed to us, and could cause disruptions in our supply chain. We rely on suppliers and third-parties to deliver raw materials and transport our finished goods. The 2020 temporary closures of our manufacturing facilities, as well as recent disruptions and delays in the global and national supply chain, have resulted in our finished goods inventory being lower than optimal for our business. This resulted in lost business during fiscal year 2021, and we were unable to fulfill orders for our customers. Prolonged inventory shortages may result in significant lost business or delay in shipments which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

The extent to which COVID-19 impacts our business will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with confidence, including the duration of the pandemic, a resurgence of the pandemic, new information that may emerge concerning the severity of COVID-19, and public and private actions to contain COVID-19 or treat its impact. The COVID-19 pandemic has and will likely continue to result in social, economic, and labor instability in the countries in which we, or the third parties with whom we engage, operate. The long-term economic impact and near-term financial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, including but not limited to, possible impairment, restructuring, and other charges, as well as overall impact on our business, results of operations, financial condition, liquidity, or capital resources and investments, cannot be reliably quantified or estimated at this time due to the uncertainty of future developments.

The OSHA vaccine mandate for employers with more than 100 employees could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. On September 9, 2021, President Biden announced plans for the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) to issue an Emergency Temporary Standard (“ETS”) mandating that all employers with more than 100 employees ensure their workers are either fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or produce, on a weekly basis, a negative COVID test (the “vaccine mandate”). On November 4, 2021, OSHA issued the ETS, which will require covered employers to comply with the vaccine mandate beginning January 4, 2022 or face substantial penalties for non-compliance. Currently, the implementation of the vaccine mandate has been blocked by a federal appeals court, subject to the resolution of ongoing litigation challenging the constitutionality of the rules. In addition to the vaccine mandate, it is possible that additional mandates may be announced by foreign or local jurisdictions that could impact our workforce and operations. We are subject to periodic litigation in both domestic and international jurisdictions that may adversely affect our financial position and results of operations. Such mandates could result in increased labor attrition and disruption, as well as difficulty securing future labor needs, and could adversely impact our results of operations.

Although we cannot predict with certainty the impact that the potential vaccine mandate and any other related measures may have on our workforce and operations, these requirements and any future requirements may require significant managerial time and attention to implement, increase our operating costs, reduce manufacturing productivity levels, result in attrition, including attrition of key employees, and impede our ability to recruit and retain our workforce. These measures also may further disrupt the national supply chain, all of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Our operations are subject to political, social, and economic risks in Honduras, El Salvador and Mexico. The majority of our products are manufactured in Honduras, El Salvador and Mexico, with concentrations in Honduras and El Salvador. These countries from time-to-time experience political, social and economic instability, and we cannot be certain of their future stability. These countries from time to time experience political, social and economic instability, and we cannot be certain of their future stability. Instability in a country can lead to protests, riots and labor unrest. Governments have changed, and may continue to change, and employment, wage and other laws and regulations may change, thereby increasing our costs to operate in those countries. Any of these political, social, or economic events or conditions could disrupt our supply chain or increase our costs, adversely affecting our financial position and results of operations. Any of these political, social, economic or climatic events or conditions could disrupt our supply chain or increase our costs, adversely affecting our financial position and results of operations. For example, in fiscal year 2018, our operations in and around San Pedro Sula, Honduras, were partially disrupted by the protests, unrest and government action associated with the November 2017 presidential elections in Honduras. These disruptions temporarily restricted the ability of our employees and suppliers to access our manufacturing facilities as well as our ability to ship products from our facilities, and negatively impacted our operations from a cost standpoint. In fiscal year 2019, our Honduran operations experienced disruptions of a similar nature that were smaller in scope than those occurring in fiscal year 2018.

If we experience disruptions or interruptions within any of our facilities, operations, or distribution networks, we may be unable to deliver our products to the market and may lose sales and customers. We own or lease manufacturing facilities in the United States, Honduras, Mexico and El Salvador. We also own or lease distribution facilities located throughout the United States and maintain inventory at certain third-party locations. Any casualty or other circumstance that damages or destroys any of these material facilities or significantly limits their ability to function could have a material adverse effect on our business. Similarly, any significant interruption in the operation of any of these facilities or our related sourcing and transportation logistics functions, whether within or outside of our control, may delay shipment of merchandise to our customers, potentially damaging our reputation and customer relationships and causing a loss of revenue. Moreover, in the event of a regional disruption where we manufacture our products, we may not be able to shift our operations to a different geographic region, and we may have to cease or curtail our operations in a selected area. This may cause us to lose sales and customers. The types of disruptions that may occur include foreign trade disruptions, import restrictions, labor disruptions, embargoes, government intervention, natural disasters, regional or global pandemics and political disruptions such as those referenced in the immediately-preceding risk section. In addition, if we are unable to successfully coordinate the planning of inventory across these facilities and the related distribution activities, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The talents and continued contributions of our key management are important to our success. We believe our future success depends on our ability to retain and motivate our key management, our ability to attract and integrate new members of management into our operations, and the ability of all personnel to work together effectively as a team and to execute our business strategy. Our inability to accomplish any of these goals could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

Energy, fuel and related costs are prone to significant fluctuations and volatility, which could adversely affect our results of operations. Our manufacturing operations require high inputs of energy, and therefore changes in energy prices directly impact our gross profits. In addition, we incur significant freight costs to transport goods between our offshore facilities and the United States, along with transportation expenses to ship products to our customers. The cost of energy and fuel fluctuates due to a number of factors outside of our control, including government policy and regulation, supply disruptions, inflation, and weather conditions. The cost of energy and fuel fluctuates due to a number of factors outside of our control, including government policy and regulation and weather conditions. We continue to focus on methods that will reduce the amount of energy used in the manufacture of products to mitigate risks of fluctuations in the cost of energy. However, significant increases in energy and fuel prices, which may have a material adverse effect on our financial position and results of operations, especially if such increases make us less competitive compared to others in the industry. However, significant increases in energy and fuel prices may make us less competitive compared to others in the industry, which may have a material adverse effect on our financial position and results of operations.

Our business operations rely on our information systems and any material disruption or slowdown of our systems could cause operational delays, reputational harm, or loss of revenue. We depend on information systems to, among other things, manage our inventory, process transactions, operate our websites, respond to customer inquiries, purchase, sell and ship goods on a timely basis, and maintain cost-effective operations. Management uses information systems to support decision-making and to monitor business performance. If we experience any disruptions or slowdowns with our information systems, we may fail to generate accurate and complete financial and operational reports essential for making decisions at various levels of management, which could lead to decisions being made that have adverse results. We have invested significant capital and expect future capital expenditures associated with the implementation and integration of our information technology systems across our businesses. This process involves the replacement and consolidation of technology platforms so that our businesses are served by fewer platforms, resulting in operational efficiencies and reduced costs. Our inability to effectively implement or convert our operations to the new systems could cause delays in product fulfillment and reduced efficiency in our operations. Further, if changes in technology cause our information systems to become obsolete, or if our information systems are inadequate to handle our growth, we could lose customers. We are also subject to risks and uncertainties associated with the internet, including changes in required technology interfaces, website downtime and other technical failures. Our failure to successfully respond to these risks and uncertainties could reduce sales, increase costs and damage the reputation of our brands. In addition, we interact with many of our customers through our websites. Customers increasingly utilize our online platforms to purchase our merchandise. If we are unable to continue to provide consumers a user-friendly experience and evolve our platforms to satisfy consumer preferences, the growth of our ecommerce and other businesses and our sales may be negatively impacted. If our websites contain errors or other vulnerabilities which impede or halt service, it could result in damage to our brands’ images and a loss of revenue. In addition, we may experience operational problems with our information systems as a result of system failures, "cyber-attacks," computer viruses, security breaches, disasters or other causes. Any material disruption or slowdown of our information systems could cause operational delays and increased costs that could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

Compromises of our data security could lead to liability and reputational damage. In the ordinary course of our business, we often collect, retain, transmit, and use sensitive and confidential information regarding customers and employees and we process customer payment card and check information. There can be no assurance that we will not suffer a data compromise, that unauthorized parties will not gain access to personal information, or that any such data compromise or access will be discovered in a timely manner. Further, the systems currently used for transmission and approval of payment card transactions, and the technology utilized in payment cards themselves, all of which can put payment card data at risk, are determined and controlled by the payment card industry, not by us. Our computer systems, software and networks may be vulnerable to breaches (including via computer hackings), unauthorized access, misuse, computer viruses, phishing or other failures or disruptions that could result in disruption to our business or the loss or theft of confidential information, including customer information. Any failure, interruption, or breach in security of these systems, could result in the misappropriation of personal information, payment card or check information or confidential business information of our Company. In addition, there may be non-technical issues, such as our employees, contractors or third parties with whom we do business or to whom we outsource business operations may attempt to circumvent our security measures in order to misappropriate such information, and may purposefully or inadvertently cause a breach involving such information.

The methods used by third parties to obtain unauthorized access change frequently and may not be anticipated or immediately detected. Thus, despite the security measures we may have in place, an actual or perceived information security breach, whether due to "cyber-attack," computer viruses or other malicious software code, or human error or malfeasance, could occur. Actual or anticipated attacks may cause us to incur significant costs to rectify the consequences of the security breach or cyber-attack, including costs to deploy additional personnel and protection technologies, repair damage to our systems, train employees and engage third-party experts and consultants. The collection, retention, transmission, and use of personal information is subject to contractual requirements and is highly regulated by a multitude of state, federal, and foreign laws. Privacy and information security laws are complex and constantly changing. Compliance with these laws and regulations may result in additional costs due to new systems and processes, and our non-compliance could lead to legal liability. Any compromise of our customer, employee or company data, failure to prevent or mitigate the loss of personal or business information, or delay in detecting or providing prompt notice of any such compromise could attract media attention, damage our customer or other business relationships and reputation, result in lost sales, fines, liability for stolen assets or information, costs of incentives we may be required to offer to our customers or business partners to retain their business, significant litigation or other costs and involve the loss of confidential company information, any or all of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

As previously disclosed in our 2019 unauthorized malware intrusions of our system may have exposed customer payment information as it was being entered to make a purchase at one of our consumer ecommerce websites. We removed the malware associated with the intrusions from our system and took actions to secure our website by working with recognized data security experts to conduct a thorough investigation of the incident and implement additional measures designed to build stronger protections against future incidents of this nature. This, or any compromise of security or cyber-attack, could deter consumers from entering into transactions that require them to provide confidential information to us in the future. In addition, if confidential customer information was misappropriated from our computer systems, we could be sued by those who assert that we did not take adequate precautions to safeguard our systems and confidential data belonging to our customers or business partners, which could subject us to liability and result in significant legal fees and expenses in defending these claims. While we do not currently believe that we experienced any material losses related to this incident, there can be no assurance that this or any other incident will not have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations.

Extreme weather conditions, natural disasters, and other catastrophic events, including those caused by climate change, could negatively impact our results of operations and financial condition. Extreme weather conditions in the areas in which our manufacturing facilities, retail stores, suppliers, customers, distribution centers, and offices are located could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition. Moreover, natural disasters such as earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, or wildfires, public health crises, such as pandemics and epidemics (including, for example, the COVID-19 pandemic), political crises, such as terrorist attacks, war and other political instability, or other catastrophic events, whether occurring in the United States or abroad, and their related consequences and effects, including energy shortages, could disrupt our operations, the operations of our suppliers or result in economic instability that could negatively impact customer spending, any or all of which would negatively impact our results of operations and financial condition. In addition, fire and other natural disasters such as hurricanes, earthquakes, or floods have occurred and can recur in the countries in which we operate. In addition, fire or natural disasters such as hurricanes, earthquakes, or floods have occurred and can recur in these countries. These types of events could impact our global supply chain, including the ability of suppliers to provide raw materials where and when needed, the ability of third parties to ship merchandise, and our ability to ship products from or to the impacted region(s).

In addition, climate change and the increased focus by governments, organizations, customers, and investors on sustainability issues, including those related to climate change and socially responsible activities, may adversely affect our reputation, business, and financial results. Investor advocacy groups, certain institutional investors, investment funds, other market participants, shareholders, and stakeholders have focused increasingly on the environmental, social, and governance, or ESG, and related sustainability practices of companies. These parties have placed increased importance on the implications of the social cost of their investments. If our ESG practices do not meet investor or other stakeholder expectations and standards (which are continually evolving and may emphasize different priorities than the ones we choose to focus on), then our brand, reputation, and potential employee retention may be negatively impacted. While we do not currently believe that we experienced any material losses related to this incident, there can be no assurance that this or any other incident will not have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations. We could also incur additional costs and require additional resources to monitor, report, and comply with various ESG practices and regulations. Also, our failure, or perceived failure, to manage reputational threats and meet expectations with respect to socially responsible activities and sustainability commitments could negatively impact our brand credibility, employee retention, and the willingness of our customers and suppliers to do business with us.

Risks Related to Legal and Regulatory Matters

Changes in U.S. or other tax laws or regulations may cause us to incur additional tax liability. We are subject to income tax in the United States and in certain foreign jurisdictions where we generate net operating profits. We generally benefit from a lower overall effective income tax rate due to the majority of our manufacturing operations being located in foreign tax-free jurisdictions or foreign jurisdictions with tax rates that are lower than those in the United States. Our U.S. legal entity contracts with our foreign subsidiaries to manufacture products on its behalf, with the intercompany prices paid for the manufacturing services and manufactured products based on an arms-length standard and supported by an economic study.

The December 22, 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the “New Tax Legislation”) significantly revised the U.S. corporate income tax code by, among other things, lowering federal corporate income tax rates, implementing a modified territorial tax system and imposing a repatriation tax ("transition tax") on deemed repatriated cumulative earnings of foreign subsidiaries. In addition, new taxes were imposed related to foreign income, including a tax on global intangible low-taxed income ("GILTI") as well as a limitation on the deduction for business interest expense ("Section 163(j)"). GILTI is the excess of the shareholder's net controlled foreign corporations (“CFCs”) net tested income over the deemed tangible income. The Section 163(j) limitation does not allow the amount of deductible interest to exceed the sum of the taxpayer's business interest income, of 30% of the taxpayer's adjusted taxable income. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (“CARES Act”), which was enacted on March 27, 2020, provided temporary changes to income and non-income-based tax laws, including some provisions which were previously enacted under the New Tax Legislation. The CARES Act revised the U.S. corporate income tax code on a temporary basis by, among other things, eliminating the 80% of taxable income limitation on net operating loss (“NOL”) carryforwards, allowing NOL carrybacks, and increasing the Section 163(j) interest limitation deduction from 30% to 50% of adjusted taxable income.

Our effective tax rate could be adversely affected by changes in the mix of earnings between the U.S. and tax-free or lower-tax foreign jurisdictions. We may be limited in our ability to deduct 50% of applicable foreign earnings under the GILTI income inclusion or to deduct U.S. interest expense based on the amount of U.S. taxable income earned in a particular fiscal year. In addition, the future impact of the CARES Act and New Tax Legislation may differ from historical amounts, possibly materially, due to, among other things, changes in interpretations and assumptions made regarding the CARES Act and New Tax Legislation, guidance that may be issued, and actions we may take as a result of the CARES Act and New Tax Legislation.

Further changes to U.S. tax laws impacting how U.S. multinational corporations are taxed on U.S. and foreign earnings, including any potential increase in U.S. corporate income tax rate, the doubling of the rate of tax on certain earnings of foreign subsidiaries, and a 15% minimum tax on worldwide book income, among other things, could have a material adverse effect on our tax expense and cash flow

We are subject to periodic litigation in both domestic and international jurisdictions that may adversely affect our financial position and results of operations. From time to time we may be involved in legal or regulatory actions regarding product liability, employment practices, intellectual property infringement, bankruptcies and other litigation or enforcement matters. Due to the inherent uncertainties of litigation in both domestic and foreign jurisdictions, we cannot accurately predict the ultimate outcome of any such proceedings. These proceedings could cause us to incur costs and may require us to devote resources to defend against these claims and could ultimately result in a loss or other remedies such as product recalls, which could adversely affect our financial position and results of operations. For a description of current material legal proceedings, see Part I, Item 3, Legal Proceedings.


Product liability issues could lead to recalls, claims and negative publicity, and adversely affect our results of operations. Our operations are subject to certain product liability risks common to most brands and manufacturers and our ability to maintain consumer confidence in the safety and quality of our products is vital to our success. We have implemented product safety and quality programs and standards that we follow and we expect our supplier partners to strictly adhere to applicable requirements and best practices. In addition to selling apparel and accessory products, we participate in a joint venture involving the sale of a branded alcoholic beverage, and we also license one of our brands for use in connection with restaurant, food and beverage services. Selling products intended for human consumption carries inherent risks and uncertainties. If we or our supplier or license partners fail to comply with applicable product safety and quality standards and our products or those otherwise associated with our brands are, or become, unsafe, non-compliant, contaminated or adulterated, we may be required to recall our products and encounter product liability claims and negative publicity. Any of these events could adversely affect our reputation, business or results of operations.

We rely on the strength of our trademarks and could incur significant costs to protect these trademarks and our other intellectual property. Our trademarks, including Salt Life®, Soffe®, Intensity Athletics®, Kudzu®, Pro Weight®, Magnum Weight®, and the Delta Design, among others, are important to our marketing efforts and have substantial value. We aggressively protect these trademarks and have incurred legal costs in the past to establish and protect these trademarks. We may in the future be required to expend significant additional resources to protect these trademarks and our other intellectual property. Intellectual property litigation may be costly and may divert management's attention from the operation of our business. Adverse determinations in any litigation may result in the loss of our proprietary rights, subject us to significant liabilities or require us to seek licenses from third parties, which may not be available on commercially reasonable terms, if at all. Any of these outcomes may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

Significant changes to international trade regulations could adversely affect our results of operations. The majority of our products are manufactured in Honduras, El Salvador and Mexico. We therefore benefit from current free trade agreements and other duty preference programs, including the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (“USMCA”), and the Central America Free Trade Agreement (“CAFTA”). Our claims for duty free or reduced duty treatment under CAFTA, USMCA and other available programs are largely conditioned on our ability to produce or obtain accurate records (some of which are provided to us by third parties) about production processes and sources of raw materials. Trade partnerships and treaties can be subjected to negotiations and modifications by domestic and foreign governments, which could result in new or increased tariffs on goods we import into the United States. Subsequent repeal or further modification of USMCA or CAFTA, further increases to tariffs on goods imported into the United States, or the inadequacy or unavailability of supporting records, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

In addition, our products are subject to foreign competition, which in the past has been faced with significant U.S. government import restrictions. The extent of import protection afforded to domestic apparel producers has been, and is likely to remain, subject to political considerations. The elimination of import protections for domestic apparel producers could significantly increase global competition, which could adversely affect our business and results of operations.

Our failure to comply with trade and other regulations could lead to investigations or actions by government regulators and negative publicity. The labeling, distribution, importation, marketing, and sale of our products are subject to extensive regulation by various federal agencies, including the Federal Trade Commission, Consumer Product Safety Commission and state attorneys' general in the United States. Any failure to comply with such regulations could cause us to become subject to investigation and enforcement actions resulting in significant penalties or claims or in our inability to conduct business, adversely affecting our results of operations.

Our international operations are also subject to compliance with the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (the “FCPA”) and other anti-bribery laws applicable to our operations. In many foreign countries, particularly in those with developing economies, it may be a local custom that businesses operating in such countries engage in business practices that are prohibited by the FCPA or other U.S. and foreign laws and regulations applicable to us. Although we have implemented procedures designed to ensure compliance with the FCPA and similar laws, some of our agents or other channel partners, as well as those companies to which we outsource certain of our business operations, could take actions in violation of our policies. Any such violation could have a material and adverse effect on our business.

Changes in domestic or foreign employment regulations or changes in our relationship with our employees could adversely affect our results of operations. As of October 2, 2021, we employed approximately 8,500 employees worldwide, with approximately 7,400 of these employees located in Honduras, El Salvador and Mexico. Changes in domestic and foreign laws and regulations governing our relationships with our employees, including wage and human resources laws and regulations, labor standards, overtime pay, unemployment tax rates, workers' compensation rates, payroll taxes, and the potential vaccine mandate would likely have a direct impact on our operating costs. Changes in domestic and foreign laws governing our relationships with our employees, including wage and human resources laws and regulations, labor standards, overtime pay, unemployment tax rates, workers' compensation rates and payroll taxes, would likely have a direct impact on our operating costs. Increases in wage rates in the countries in which we operate have occurred, and any further significant increases in wage rates in those countries could have a material adverse impact on our operating results. A total of approximately 2,900 employees at two of our facilities in San Pedro Sula, Honduras, are party to multi-year collective bargaining agreements. We have historically conducted our operations without significant labor disruptions and believe that our relations with our employees are generally good. However, a change in labor relations could adversely affect the productivity and ultimate cost of our manufacturing operations.

Our business is dependent on attracting and retaining a large number of quality associates with staffing needs especially high during the holiday season. Competition for personnel during this time of year is highly competitive, and there is no assurance we will be able to attract and retain a sufficient number of qualified personnel in future periods. Our ability to meet our labor needs is subject to many factors, such as prevailing wage rates, minimum wage legislation, unemployment levels, and actions by our competitors in compensation levels. In addition, changes in federal, state, or local laws and regulations relating to employee benefits, including, but not limited to, sick time, paid time off, leave of absence, wage-and-hour, overtime, and meal-and-break time could cause us to incur additional costs. Competitive and regulatory pressures have already significantly increased our labor costs and we may be unable to fully pass these costs to our customers through increased selling prices, which could deteriorate our profitability. Competitive and regulatory pressures have already significantly increased our labor costs and further changes that adversely impact our ability to attract and retain personnel could adversely affect our results of operations in the future. In addition further changes that hurt our ability to attract and retain personnel could adversely affect our results of operations in the future.

The value of our brands, sales of our products and our licensing relationships could be impacted by negative publicity resulting from violations of manufacturing or employee safety standards or labor laws, or unethical business practices, by our suppliers and independent contractors. We are committed to ensuring that all of our manufacturing facilities comply with our strict internal code of conduct, applicable laws and regulations, and the codes and principles to which we subscribe. In addition, we require our suppliers and independent contractors to operate their businesses in compliance with the laws and regulations that apply to them. However, we do not control these suppliers and independent contractors. A violation of our policies, applicable manufacturing or employee safety standards and codes of conduct, labor laws or other laws or regulations by our suppliers or independent contractors could interrupt or otherwise disrupt our operations. Negative publicity regarding the production or operating methods of any of our suppliers or independent contractors or their failure to comply with our policies, applicable manufacturing or employee safety standards and codes of conduct, labor laws or other laws or regulations could adversely affect our reputation, brands, sales and licensing relationships, which could adversely affect our business and results of operations.

Risks Related to Financial Matters

We may be restricted in our ability to borrow under our revolving credit facility or service our indebtedness. Significant operating losses or significant uses of cash in our operations could cause us to default on our asset-based revolving credit facility. We rely on our credit facility, as well as on cash generated by our operations, to fund our working capital and capital expenditure needs, to make acquisitions, to fund repurchases under our share repurchase program and to pay dividends should we choose to do so in the future. Our working capital needs are generally greater in advance of the spring and summer selling seasons. Availability under our credit facility is primarily a function of the levels of our accounts receivable and inventory, as well as the uses of cash in our operations. A significant deterioration in our accounts receivable or inventory levels could restrict our ability to borrow additional funds or service our indebtedness. Cash on hand and availability under our U.S. revolving credit facility totaled $45.3 million at October 2, 2021, well above the minimum thresholds specified in our credit agreement. In addition, we were above the 1.1 to 1.0 FCCR for the preceding 12-month period. A significant deterioration in our business could cause our availability to fall below minimum thresholds, thereby requiring us to maintain the minimum FCCR specified in our credit agreement, which we may not be able to maintain. The covenants include, among other things, limitations on asset sales, consolidations, mergers, liens, indebtedness, loans, investments, guaranties, acquisitions, dividends, stock repurchases, and transactions with affiliates. If an event of default under our credit facility occurred or became imminent, we may request our credit agreement lenders to provide a waiver. If we were unsuccessful in that endeavor, we could explore alternative sources of capital, whether debt or equity, which would likely be more expensive than the costs we incur under our credit facility. If we were unable to cure an un-waived event of default under our credit facility, we would be unable to borrow additional amounts under the facility, we could be unable to make acquisitions as well as fund share repurchases and pay dividends, and our lenders thereunder could accelerate our obligations under the agreement and foreclose on our assets subject to the liens in their favor. This circumstance would have a material adverse effect on our financial position and results of operations.

Deterioration in the financial condition of our customers or suppliers and changes in the operations and strategies of our customers or suppliers could adversely affect our financial position and results of operations. We extend credit to our customers, generally without requiring collateral. The extension of credit involves considerable judgment and is based on an evaluation of each customer’s financial condition and payment history. We monitor credit risk exposure by periodically obtaining credit reports and updated financial statements on our customers. Deterioration in the economy, declines in consumer purchases of apparel, disruption in the apparel retail environment, or the inability of our customers to access liquidity could have an adverse effect on the financial condition of our customers. During the past several years, various retailers and other customers have experienced significant difficulties, including consolidations, restructurings, bankruptcies and liquidations as well as retail shutdowns as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The inability of retailers and other customers to overcome these difficulties may continue or even increase due to the current economic and retail market conditions. We maintain an allowance for doubtful accounts for potential credit losses based upon current conditions, historical trends, estimates and other available information, which involves judgments and uncertainties. During fiscal year 2020, we estimated and recorded additional reserves based on the heightened risks in the market as the U.S. and our customers continue to recover from the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. During fiscal year 2021, customers paid on the credit extended to them, and we ended fiscal year 2021 with days sales outstanding at 47.4 days, down from 51.2 days at September 2020 and 47.5 days at September 2019. As such, we reversed the additional credit risk reserves recorded during fiscal year 2020, but maintain our normal allowance for doubtful accounts for potential credit losses. Although our historical allowances have been materially accurate, if market conditions change, additional reserves may be required. The inability to collect on sales to significant customers or a group of customers could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. Significant changes in the financial condition of any of our suppliers or other parties with which we do business could result in disruption to our business and have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, significant changes in the retail, merchandising and/or operational strategies employed by our customers may result in decreased sales of our products to such customers and could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. Likewise, significant changes in the operations of any of our suppliers or other parties with which we do business could result in disruption to our business and have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Our variable rate debt subjects us to interest rate risk that could cause our debt service obligations to increase significantly. The debt we incur under our asset-based revolving credit facility is at variable rates of interest, which exposes us to interest rate risk. If interest rates increase, our obligations on this variable rate indebtedness would increase even though the amount borrowed remained the same, and there would be a corresponding decrease in our net income and cash flows, including cash available for servicing our debt. In addition, certain of the variable rate indebtedness extended to us uses the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) as a benchmark for establishing the interest rate. While we believe we will continue to use LIBOR through fiscal 2022 and into fiscal 2023, recent regulatory reform efforts may cause LIBOR to cease to exist, new methods of calculating LIBOR to be established, or the use of an alternative reference rate(s). These consequences are not entirely predictable and could have an adverse impact on our financing costs, returns on investments, valuation of derivative contracts and our financial results.

We may need to raise additional capital to grow our business. The rate of our growth, especially through acquisitions, depends, in part, on the availability of debt and equity capital. We may not be able to raise capital on terms acceptable to us or at all. If new sources of financing are required, but are insufficient or unavailable, we may be required to modify our growth and operating plans based on available funding, which could adversely affect our ability to grow the business.

We may be subject to the impairment of acquired intangible assets. When we acquire a business, a portion of the purchase price of the acquisition may be allocated to goodwill and other identifiable intangible assets. The amount of the purchase price that is allocated to goodwill is determined by the excess of the purchase price over the net identifiable assets acquired. At September 2021 and 2020, our goodwill and other intangible assets were approximately $64.2 million and $57.8 million, respectively. At October 3, 2020, and September 28, 2019, our goodwill and other intangible assets were approximately $57.8 million and $59.5 million, respectively. We conduct an annual review, and more frequent reviews if events or circumstances dictate, to determine whether goodwill is impaired. We also determine whether impairment indicators are present related to our identifiable intangible assets. If we determine that goodwill or intangible assets are impaired, we would be required to write down the value of these assets. We complete our annual impairment test of goodwill on the first day of our third fiscal quarter. For fiscal year 2021, we concluded based on the valuation estimates that there was no indication of impairment on the goodwill recorded on our financial statements. We also concluded that there are no additional indicators of impairment related to our intangible assets. There can, however, be no assurance that we will not be required to take an impairment charge in the future, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

We are subject to foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations. We manufacture the majority of our products outside of the United States, exposing us to currency exchange rate fluctuations. In addition, movements in foreign exchange rates can affect transaction costs because we source products from various countries. We may seek to mitigate our exposure to currency exchange rate fluctuations but our efforts may not be successful. Accordingly, changes in the relative strength of the United States dollar against other currencies could adversely affect our business.

The market price of our shares is affected by the illiquidity of our shares, which could lead to our shares trading at prices that are significantly lower than expected. Various investment banking firms have informed us that public companies with relatively small market capitalizations have difficulty generating institutional interest, research coverage or trading volume. This illiquidity can translate into price discounts as compared to industry peers or to the shares’ inherent value. We believe that the market perceives us to have a relatively small market capitalization. This has led and could continue to lead to our shares trading at prices that are significantly lower than our estimate of their inherent value.

As of November 17, 2021, we had 6,974,660 shares of common stock outstanding. We believe that approximately 36% of our stock is beneficially owned by entities and individuals who each own more than 5% of the outstanding shares of our common stock. Institutional investors that beneficially own more than 5% of the outstanding shares own approximately 24% of the outstanding shares of our common stock. Sales of substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market by any of these large holders could adversely affect the market price of our common stock, especially in light of the limited trading volumes. Sales of substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market by any of these large holders could adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

The market price of our shares may be highly volatile, and the stock market in general can be highly volatile. Fluctuations in our stock price may be influenced by, among other things, general economic and market conditions, conditions or trends in our industry, changes in the market valuations of other apparel companies, announcements by us or our competitors of significant acquisitions, strategic partnerships or other strategic initiatives, and trading volumes. Many of these factors are beyond our control, but may cause the market price of our common stock to decline, regardless of our operating performance.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comment

None.

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