Quiver Quantitative

Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - TMRC

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ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

The following sets forth certain risks and uncertainties that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and/or results of operations, and the trading price of our common stock which may decline and investors may lose all or part of their investment. These risk factors should be considered along with the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K because these factors could cause our actual results or financial condition to differ materially from those projected in forward-looking statements. Additional risks and uncertainties that we do not presently know or that we currently deem immaterial also may impair our business operations. We cannot assure you that we will successfully address these risks or that other unknown risks exist that may affect our business.

Risk Related to Our Business

We have a history of losses and will require additional financing to fund operations. Failure to obtain additional financing could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operation and could cast uncertainty on our ability to continue as a going concern in future periods.

During the fiscal year ended August 31, 2021, we had no revenues. For the fiscal year ended August 31, 2021, our net income was approximately $2,044,000 and our accumulated deficit at August 31, 2021 was approximately $36.9 million. For the fiscal year ended August 31, 2020, our net loss was approximately $1,141,000 and our accumulated deficit at August 31, 2020 was approximately $38.9 million. At August 31, 2021, our cash position was approximately $5,107,000 and our working capital surplus was approximately $4,978,000. Round Top has not commenced commercial production on any of our mineral properties. At August 31, 2020, our cash position was approximately $2,746,000 and our working capital surplus was approximately $1,836,000. We have not commenced commercial production on any of our mineral properties. We have no revenues from operations and anticipate we will have no operating revenues during the current fiscal year. We have no revenues from operations and anticipate we will have no operating revenues until we place one or more of our properties into production.

During the current fiscal year, Round Top is expected to fund the expenditure of approximately $20 million to optimize the leaching and developing of the CIX/CIC processing of the Round Top Project. Initial process design work will be carried out at USARE’s facility in Wheat Ridge, Colorado. Pending completion of the initial process development, this facility will either be relocated to or replicated at the Round Top Project where a pilot plant is expected to be established. Pending completion of the initial process development, this facility will either be relocated to or replicated at Round Top where a pilot plant will be established. This work will consist of mining and crushing approximately 40,000 tons of rhyolite and setting up and equipping a facility to conduct pilot plant scale heap leaching. It is estimated that the Round Top Project will require additional time and further expenditure to complete a bankable feasibility study. We plan to fund up to approximately $3.5 million of the expected expenditures by Round Top during our fiscal year ending August 31, 2022.

We have sufficient cash on hand to fund our portion of the Round Top Budget during our current fiscal year. Thereafter, we will need to raise additional funding to implement our business strategy and to continue to fund our portion of the Round Top Budget, the failure of which could cause us to curtail or cease our operations. The most likely source of future financing presently available to us is through the sale of our securities. Any sale of our shares of Common Stock will result in dilution of equity ownership to existing stockholders. This means that if we sell shares of Common Stock, more shares will be outstanding and each existing stockholder will own a smaller percentage of the shares then outstanding. Alternatively, we may rely on debt financing and assume debt obligations that require us to make substantial interest and capital payments. Also, we may issue or grant warrants or options in the future pursuant to which additional shares of Common Stock may be issued. Exercise of such warrants or options will result in dilution of equity ownership to our existing stockholders.

We have a limited operating history on which to base an evaluation of our business and properties.

Any investment in the Company should be considered a high-risk investment because investors will be placing funds at risk in an early stage, under-capitalized business with unforeseen costs, expenses, competition, a history of operating losses and other problems to which start-up ventures are often subject. Investors should not invest in the Company unless they can afford to lose their entire investment. Your investment must be considered in light of the risks, expenses, and difficulties encountered in establishing a new business in a highly competitive and mature industry. Our operating history has been restricted to the acquisition and sampling of the Round Top Project and this does not provide a meaningful basis for an evaluation of the Round Top Project. Our operating history has been restricted to the acquisition and sampling of our Round Top Project and this does not provide a meaningful basis for an evaluation of our Round Top Project. Other than through conventional and typical exploration methods and procedures, we have no additional way to evaluate the likelihood of whether the Round Top Project contains commercial quantities of mineral reserves or, if it does, that it will be operated successfully. We anticipate that we will continue to incur operating costs without realizing any revenues during the period when we are exploring our properties.

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The Round Top Project is in the exploration stage. There is no assurance that Round Top can establish the existence of any mineral reserve from the Round Top Project in commercially exploitable quantities. There is no assurance that we can establish the existence of any mineral reserve from the Round Top Project in commercially exploitable quantities. Until then, we cannot earn any revenues from the Round Top Project, and our business could fail. Until we can do so, we cannot earn any revenues from the Round Top Project, and our business could fail.

We have not established that the Round Top Project contains any commercial exploitable quantities of mineral reserve, nor can there be any assurance that we will be able to do so. The probability of the Round Top Project ever having a commercial exploitable mineral reserve that meets the requirements of the SEC may be remote. Even if we do eventually discover commercial exploitable quantities of mineral reserve on the Round Top Project, there can be no assurance that it can be developed into a producing mine and extract those minerals. Both mineral exploration and development involve a high degree of risk and few properties, which are explored, are ultimately developed into producing mines.

The commercial viability of an established mineral deposit will depend on a number of factors including, by way of example, the size, grade and other attributes of the mineral deposit, the proximity of the deposit to infrastructure such as a smelter, roads and a point for shipping, government regulation and market prices. Most of these factors will be beyond our control, and any of them could increase costs and make extraction of any identified mineral deposit unprofitable.

Even if commercial viability of a mineral deposit is established, it may take several years in the initial phases of drilling until production is possible, during which time the economic feasibility of production may change. Substantial expenditures are required to establish proven and probable reserves through drilling and bulk sampling, to determine the optimal metallurgical process to extract the metals from the ore and, in the case of new properties, to construct mining and processing facilities. Because of these uncertainties, no assurance can be given that our exploration programs will result in the establishment or expansion of a mineral deposit or reserves.

We have no history of producing metals from the Round Top Project.

We have no history of producing metals from the Round Top Project. The Round Top Project is an exploration stage property in the early stage of exploration and evaluation. Advancing properties from exploration into the development stage requires significant capital and time, and successful commercial production from the Round Top Project, if any, will be subject to completing feasibility studies, permitting and construction of the mine, processing plants, roads, and other related works and infrastructure. As a result, we are subject to all of the risks associated with developing and establishing new mining operations and business enterprises including:

completion of feasibility studies to verify reserves and commercial viability, including the ability to find sufficient REE reserves to support a commercial mining operation;

the timing and cost, which can be considerable, of further exploration, preparing feasibility studies, permitting and construction of infrastructure, mining and processing facilities;

the availability and costs of drill equipment, exploration personnel, skilled labor and mining and processing equipment, if required;

the availability and cost of appropriate smelting and/or refining arrangements, if required, and securing a commercially viable sales outlet for our products;

compliance with environmental and other governmental approval and permit requirements;

the availability of funds to finance exploration, development and construction activities, as warranted;

potential opposition from non-governmental organizations, environmental groups, local groups or local inhabitants which may delay or prevent development activities;

potential increases in exploration, construction and operating costs due to changes in the cost of fuel, power, materials and supplies; and

potential shortages of mineral processing, construction and other facilities related supplies.

The costs, timing and complexities of exploration, development and construction activities may be increased by the location of the Round Top Project (or other properties that may subsequently be acquired) and demand by other mineral exploration and mining companies. It is common in exploration programs to experience unexpected problems and delays during drill programs and, if warranted, development, construction and mine start-up activities. Accordingly, our activities may not result in profitable mining operations and we may not succeed in establishing mining operations or profitably producing metals at any of our properties.

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If we establish the existence of a mineral reserve in the Round Top Project in a commercially exploitable quantity, we will require additional capital in order to develop the property into a producing mine. If we cannot raise this additional capital, we will not be able to exploit the reserve, and our business could fail.

If we do discover mineral reserves in commercially exploitable quantities in the Round Top Project (or any of our properties that may subsequently be acquired), we will be required to expend substantial sums of money to establish the extent of the reserve, develop processes to extract it and develop extraction and processing facilities and infrastructure. We do not have adequate capital to develop necessary facilities and infrastructure and will need to raise additional funds. We do not have adequate capital to develop necessary facilities and infrastructure and will need to raise additional funds (the expected capital from USA Rare Earth will not address these needs). Although we may derive substantial benefits from the discovery of a major mineral deposit, there can be no assurance that such a deposit will be large enough to justify commercial operations, nor can there be any assurance that we will be able to raise the funds required for development on a timely basis. If we cannot raise the necessary capital or complete the necessary facilities and infrastructure, our business may fail and your investment in our Common Stock will be lost.

Our exploration activities may not be commercially successful.

Our long-term success depends on our ability to identify mineral deposits in the Round Top Project or other properties we may acquire, if any, that we can then develop into commercially viable mining operations. Our belief that the Round Top Project contains commercially exploitable minerals has been based solely on preliminary tests that we have conducted and data provided by third parties, including the data published in various third party reports. There can be no assurance that the tests and data upon which we have relied is correct or accurate. Moreover, mineral exploration is highly speculative in nature, involves many risks and is frequently non-productive. Unusual or unexpected geologic formations and the inability to obtain suitable or adequate machinery, equipment or labor are risks involved in the conduct of exploration programs. The success of mineral exploration and development is determined in part by the following factors:

the identification of potential mineralization based on analysis;

the availability of exploration permits;

the quality of our management and our geological and technical expertise; and

the capital available for exploration.

Substantial expenditures and time are required to establish existing proven and probable reserves through drilling and analysis, to develop metallurgical processes to extract metal, and to develop the mining and processing facilities and infrastructure at any site chosen for mining. Whether a mineral deposit will be commercially viable depends on a number of factors, which include, without limitation, the particular attributes of the deposit, such as size, grade and proximity to infrastructure; metal prices, which fluctuate widely; and government regulations, including, without limitation, regulations relating to prices, taxes, royalties, land tenure, land use, allowable production, importing and exporting of minerals and environmental protection. Any one or a combination of these factors may result in us not receiving an adequate return on our investment capital. The decision to abandon a project may have an adverse effect on the market value of our securities and our ability to raise future financing.

Increased costs could affect our financial condition.

We anticipate that costs at the Round Top Project as it is developed, if warranted, will frequently be subject to variation from one year to the next due to a number of factors, such as changing ore grade, metallurgy and revisions to mine plans, if any, in response to the physical shape and location of the ore body. In addition, costs are affected by the price of commodities such as fuel, rubber, and electricity. Such commodities are at times subject to volatile price movements, including increases that could make production at certain operations less profitable. A material increase in costs at any significant location could have a significant effect on the Round Top operations. A material increase in costs at any significant location could have a significant effect on our operations.

A shortage of equipment and supplies could adversely affect our ability to operate our business.

Round Top is and will be dependent on various supplies and equipment to carry out mining exploration and, if warranted, development operations. The shortage of such supplies, equipment and parts could have a material adverse effect on the ability to carry out Round Top’s operations and therefore limit or increase the cost of production. The shortage of such supplies, equipment and parts could have a material adverse effect on our ability to carry out our operations and therefore limit or increase the cost of production.

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Mining and mineral exploration is inherently dangerous and subject to conditions or events beyond our control, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and plans.

Mining and mineral exploration involves various types of risks and hazards, including:

environmental hazards;

power outages;

metallurgical and other processing problems;

unusual or unexpected geological formations;

personal injury, flooding, fire, explosions, cave-ins, landslides and rock-bursts;

inability to obtain suitable or adequate machinery, equipment, or labor;

metals losses;

fluctuations in exploration, development and production costs;

labor disputes;

unanticipated variations in grade;

mechanical equipment failure; and

periodic interruptions due to inclement or hazardous weather conditions.

These risks could result in damage to, or destruction of, the Round Top Project, production facilities or other properties, personal injury, environmental damage, delays in mining, increased production costs, monetary losses and possible legal liability. Round Top may not be able to obtain insurance to cover these risks at economically feasible premiums. We may not be able to obtain insurance to cover these risks at economically feasible premiums. Insurance against certain environmental risks, including potential liability for pollution or other hazards as a result of the disposal of waste products occurring from production, may be prohibitively expensive. Round Top may suffer a material adverse effect on its business if not covered by insurance policies.

The figures for our mineralization are estimates based on interpretation and assumptions and may yield less mineral production under actual conditions than is currently estimated.

Unless otherwise indicated, mineralization figures presented in this Annual Report and in our filings with securities regulatory authorities, press releases and other public statements that may be made from time to time are based upon estimates made by independent geologists and our internal geologists. When making determinations about whether to advance any of our projects to development, we must rely upon such estimated calculations as to the mineral reserves and grades of mineralization on our properties. Until ore is actually mined and processed, mineral reserves and grades of mineralization must be considered as estimates only.

Estimates can be imprecise and depend upon geological interpretation and statistical inferences drawn from drilling and sampling analysis, which may prove to be unreliable. We cannot assure you that:

these interpretations and inferences will be accurate;

mineralization estimates will be accurate; or

this mineralization can be mined or processed profitably.

Analytical uncertainties of resource estimates

All resource and grade estimates are based on state of the art analytical methods. However, any procedure for analyzing small amounts of metals in a chemically complex matrix may be subject to error and other uncertainties.

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The Round Top operations may contain significant uninsured risks which could negatively impact future profitability.

The exploration of the Round Top Project contains certain risks, including unexpected or unusual operating conditions including rock bursts, cave-ins, flooding, fire and earthquakes. It is not always possible to insure against these risks. Should events such as these arise, they could reduce or eliminate our investment in Round Top as well as result in increased costs and a decline in the value of our investment. Should events such as these arise, they could reduce or eliminate our assets and shareholder equity as well as result in increased costs and a decline in the value of our securities.

Mineral operations are subject to market forces outside of our control which could negatively impact us.

The marketability of minerals is affected by numerous factors beyond our control including market fluctuations, government regulations relating to prices, taxes, royalties, allowable production, imports, exports and supply and demand. One or more of these risk elements could have an impact on the costs of the Round Top operations and, if significant enough, could impact our investment. One or more of these risk elements could have an impact on the costs of our operations and if significant enough, reduce any profitability of our operations.

We may be adversely affected by fluctuations in demand for, and prices of, rare earth products.

We expect to derive revenues, if any, from the sale of rare earth and related minerals by Round Top. Changes in demand for, and the market price of, these minerals could significantly affect us. The value and price of our Common Stock and our financial results may be significantly adversely affected by declines in the prices of rare earth minerals and products. Rare earth minerals and product prices may fluctuate and are affected by numerous factors beyond our control such as interest rates, exchange rates, inflation or deflation, fluctuation in the relative value of the U.S. dollar against foreign currencies on the world market, global and regional supply and demand for rare earth minerals and products, and the political and economic conditions of countries that produce rare earth minerals and products.

A prolonged or significant economic contraction in the United States or worldwide could put further downward pressure on market prices of rare earth minerals and products. Protracted periods of low prices for rare earth minerals and products could significantly reduce revenues and the availability of required development funds in the future. This could cause substantial reductions to, or a suspension of, REO production operations, impair asset values and if reserves are established on our prospects, reduce our proven and probable rare earth ore reserves.

In contrast, extended periods of high commodity prices may create economic dislocations that may be destabilizing to rare earth minerals supply and demand and ultimately to the broader markets. Periods of high rare earth mineral market prices generally are beneficial to us. Periods of high rare earth mineral market prices generally are beneficial to our financial performance. However, strong rare earth mineral prices also create economic pressure to identify or create alternate technologies that ultimately could depress future long-term demand for rare earth minerals and products, and at the same time may incentivize development of otherwise marginal mining properties.

Permitting, licensing and approval processes are required for the operations at the Round Top Project and obtaining and maintaining required permits and licenses is subject to conditions which may be unable to be achieved.

Both mineral exploration and extraction at the Round Top Project requires permits from various federal, state, provincial and local governmental authorities and are governed by laws and regulations, including those with respect to prospecting, mine development, mineral production, transport, export, taxation, labor standards, occupational health, waste disposal, toxic substances, land use, environmental protection, mine safety and other matters. Permits known to be required are (i) an operating plan for the conduct of exploration and development approved by the GLO, (ii) an operating plan for production approved by the GLO, (iii) various reporting to and approval by the Texas Railroad Commission regarding drilling and plugging of drill holes, and (v) reporting to and compliance with regulations of the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality. If Round Top recovers uranium at the Round Top Project, it will be required to obtain a source material license from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. If we recover uranium at the Round Top Project, we will be required to obtain a source material license from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Round Top may also be subject to the reporting requirements and regulations of the Texas Department of Health. We may also be subject to the reporting requirements and regulations of the Texas Department of Health. Such licenses and permits are subject to changes in regulations and changes in various operating circumstances. Companies that engage in exploration activities often experience increased costs and delays in production and other schedules as a result of the need to comply with applicable laws, regulations and permits. Companies engaged in exploration activities often experience increased costs and delays in production and other schedules as a result of the need to comply with applicable laws, regulations and permits. Companies engaged in exploration activities often experience increased costs and delays in production and other schedules as a result of the need to comply with applicable laws, regulations and permits. Issuance of permits for the Round Top activities is subject to the discretion of government authorities, and Round Top may be unable to obtain or maintain such permits. Issuance of permits for our activities is subject to the discretion of government authorities, and we may be unable to obtain or maintain such permits. Permits required for future exploration or development may not be obtainable on reasonable terms or on a timely basis. There can be no assurance that Round Top will be able to obtain or maintain any of the permits required for the continued exploration or development of the Round Top Project (or any other of our mineral properties that we may subsequently acquire) or for the construction and operation of a mine on our properties that we may subsequently acquire at economically viable costs. There can be no assurance that we will be able to obtain or maintain any of the permits required for the continued exploration or development of the Round Top Project (or any other of our mineral properties that we may subsequently acquire) or for the construction and operation of a mine on our properties that we may subsequently acquire at economically viable costs. If Round Top or we cannot accomplish these objectives, our business could face difficulty and/or fail. If we cannot accomplish these objectives, our business could face difficulty and/or fail.

Round Top is subject to significant governmental regulations, which affect its operations and costs of conducting its business.

Round Top’s current and future operations are and will be governed by laws and regulations, including:

laws and regulations governing mineral concession acquisition, prospecting, development, mining and production;

laws and regulations related to exports, taxes and fees;

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labor standards and regulations related to occupational health and mine safety;

environmental standards and regulations related to waste disposal, toxic substances, land use and environmental protection; and

other matters.

Companies engaged in exploration activities often experience increased costs and delays in production and other schedules as a result of the need to comply with applicable laws, regulations and permits. Failure to comply with applicable laws, regulations and permits may result in enforcement actions, including the forfeiture of claims, orders issued by regulatory or judicial authorities requiring operations to cease or be curtailed, and may include corrective measures requiring capital expenditures, installation of additional equipment or costly remedial actions. Round Top may be required to compensate those suffering loss or damage by reason of its mineral exploration activities and may have civil or criminal fines or penalties imposed for violations of such laws, regulations and permits. We may be required to compensate those suffering loss or damage by reason of our mineral exploration activities and may have civil or criminal fines or penalties imposed for violations of such laws, regulations and permits.

Existing and possible future laws, regulations and permits governing operations and activities of exploration companies, or more stringent implementation, could have a material adverse impact on Round Top’s business and cause increases in capital expenditures or require abandonment or delays in exploration.

Regulations and pending legislation governing issues involving climate change could result in increased operating costs, which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

A number of governments or governmental bodies have introduced or are contemplating regulatory changes in response to various climate change interest groups and the potential impact of climate change. Legislation and increased regulation regarding climate change could impose significant costs on Round Top, our venture partners and our suppliers, including costs related to increased energy requirements, capital equipment, environmental monitoring and reporting and other costs to comply with such regulations. Legislation and increased regulation regarding climate change could impose significant costs on us, our venture partners and our suppliers, including costs related to increased energy requirements, capital equipment, environmental monitoring and reporting and other costs to comply with such regulations. Any adopted future climate change regulations could also negatively impact the ability to compete with companies situated in areas not subject to such limitations. Given the emotion, political significance and uncertainty around the impact of climate change and how it should be dealt with, we cannot predict how legislation and regulation will affect our financial condition, operating performance and ability to compete. Furthermore, even without such regulation, increased awareness and any adverse publicity in the global marketplace about potential impacts on climate change by us or other companies in our industry could harm our reputation. The potential physical impacts of climate change on our operations are highly uncertain, and would be particular to the geographic circumstances in areas in which we operate. These may include changes in rainfall and storm patterns and intensities, water shortages, changing sea levels and changing temperatures. These impacts may adversely impact the cost, production and financial performance of our operations.

Round Top’s exploration and development activities are subject to environmental risks, which could expose Round Top to significant liability and delay, suspension or termination of our operations.

The exploration, possible future development and production phases of the Round Top business will be subject to federal, state and local environmental regulation. These regulations mandate, among other things, the maintenance of air and water quality standards and land reclamation. They also set out limitations on the generation, transportation, storage and disposal of solid and hazardous waste. Environmental legislation is evolving in a manner which will require stricter standards and enforcement, increased fines and penalties for non-compliance, more stringent environmental assessments, and a heightened degree of responsibility for companies and their officers, directors and employees. Future changes in environmental regulations, if any, may adversely affect our operations. If Round Top fails to comply with any of the applicable environmental laws, regulations or permit requirements, it could face regulatory or judicial sanctions. If we fail to comply with any of the applicable environmental laws, regulations or permit requirements, we could face regulatory or judicial sanctions. Penalties imposed by either the courts or administrative bodies could delay or stop operations or require a considerable capital expenditure. Penalties imposed by either the courts or administrative bodies could delay or stop our operations or require a considerable capital expenditure. Although Round Top intends to comply with all environmental laws and permitting obligations in conducting its business, there is a possibility that those opposed to exploration and mining will attempt to interfere with its operations, whether by legal process, regulatory process or otherwise. Although we intend to comply with all environmental laws and permitting obligations in conducting our business, there is a possibility that those opposed to exploration and mining will attempt to interfere with our operations, whether by legal process, regulatory process or otherwise.

Environmental hazards unknown to Round Top, which have been caused by previous or existing owners or operators of the properties, may exist on the properties comprising the Round Top Project. It is possible that these properties could be located on or near the site of a Federal Superfund cleanup project; as such, it is possible that environmental cleanup or other environmental restoration procedures could remain to be completed or mandated by law, causing unpredictable and unexpected liabilities to arise.

The Comprehensive Environmental, Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (“CERCLA”), and comparable state statutes, impose strict, joint and several liability on current and former owners and operators of sites and on persons who disposed of or arranged for the disposal of hazardous substances found at such sites. It is not uncommon for the government to file claims requiring cleanup actions, demands for reimbursement for government-incurred cleanup costs, or natural resource damages, or for neighboring landowners and other third parties to file claims for personal injury and property damage allegedly caused by hazardous substances released into the environment. The Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (“RCRA”), and comparable state statutes, govern the disposal of solid waste and hazardous waste and authorize the imposition of substantial fines and penalties for noncompliance, as well as requirements for corrective actions. CERCLA, RCRA and comparable state statutes can impose liability for clean-up of sites and disposal of substances found on exploration, mining and processing sites long after activities on such sites have been completed.

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The Clean Air Act, as amended, restricts the emission of air pollutants from many sources, including mining and processing activities. Our mining operations may produce air emissions, including fugitive dust and other air pollutants from stationary equipment, storage facilities and the use of mobile sources such as trucks and heavy construction equipment, which are subject to review, monitoring and/or control requirements under the Clean Air Act and state air quality laws. New facilities may be required to obtain permits before work can begin, and existing facilities may be required to incur capital costs in order to remain in compliance. In addition, permitting rules may impose limitations on our production levels or result in additional capital expenditures in order to comply with the rules.

The National Environmental Policy Act (“NEPA”) requires federal agencies to integrate environmental considerations into their decision-making processes by evaluating the environmental impacts of their proposed actions, including issuance of permits to mining facilities, and assessing alternatives to those actions. If a proposed action could significantly affect the environment, the agency must prepare a detailed statement known as an Environmental Impact Statement (“EIS”). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”), other federal agencies, and any interested third parties will review and comment on the scoping of the EIS and the adequacy of and findings set forth in the draft and final EIS. This process can cause delays in issuance of required permits or result in changes to a project to mitigate its potential environmental impacts, which can in turn impact the economic feasibility of a proposed project.

The Clean Water Act (“CWA”), and comparable state statutes, imposes restrictions and controls on the discharge of pollutants into waters of the United States. The discharge of pollutants into regulated waters is prohibited, except in accordance with the terms of a permit issued by the EPA or an analogous state agency. The CWA regulates storm water mining facilities and requires a storm water discharge permit for certain activities. Such a permit requires the regulated facility to monitor and sample storm water run-off from its operations. The CWA and regulations implemented thereunder also prohibit discharges of dredged and fill material in wetlands and other waters of the United States unless authorized by an appropriately issued permit. The CWA and comparable state statutes provide for civil, criminal and administrative penalties for unauthorized discharges of pollutants and impose liability on parties responsible for those discharges for the costs of cleaning up any environmental damage caused by the release and for natural resource damages resulting from the release.

The Safe Drinking Water Act (“SDWA”) and the Underground Injection Control (“UIC”) program promulgated thereunder, regulate the drilling and operation of subsurface injection wells. EPA directly administers the UIC program in some states and in others the responsibility for the program has been delegated to the state. The program requires that a permit be obtained before drilling a disposal or injection well. Violation of these regulations and/or contamination of groundwater by mining related activities may result in fines, penalties, and remediation costs, among other sanctions and liabilities under the SWDA and state laws. In addition, third party claims may be filed by landowners and other parties claiming damages for alternative water supplies, property damages, and bodily injury.

We could be subject to environmental lawsuits.

Neighboring landowners and other third parties could file claims based on environmental statutes and common law for personal injury and property damage allegedly caused by the release of hazardous substances or other waste material into the environment on or around the Round Top Project. There can be no assurance that our defense of such claims will be successful. A successful claim against us could have an adverse effect on our business prospects, financial condition and results of operation.

Land reclamation requirements for the Round Top Project may be burdensome and expensive.

Although variability exists by location and the governing authority, land reclamation requirements are generally imposed on mineral exploration companies (as well as companies with mining operations) in order to minimize long term effects of land disturbance.

Reclamation may include requirements to:

control dispersion of potentially deleterious effluents;

treat ground and surface water to drinking water standards; and

reasonably re-establish pre-disturbance land forms and vegetation.

In order to carry out reclamation obligations imposed on Round Top in connection with potential development activities, Round Top must allocate financial resources that might otherwise be spent on further exploration and development programs. Round Top plans to set up a provision for our reclamation obligations on its properties, as appropriate, but this provision may not be adequate. We plan to set up a provision for our reclamation obligations on our properties, as appropriate, but this provision may not be adequate. If Round Top is required to carry out unanticipated reclamation work, its financial position could be adversely affected. If we are required to carry out unanticipated reclamation work, our financial position could be adversely affected. In accordance with GLO lease/prospecting permits, all the areas impacted by the surface operations shall be reclaimed upon completion of the activity, including (a) removal of all trash, debris, plastic and contaminated soil by off-site disposal, and (b) upon completion of surface grading, the soil surface shall be left in a roughened condition to negate wind and enhance water infiltration. In accordance with our GLO lease/prospecting permits, all the areas impacted by the surface operations shall be reclaimed upon completion of the activity, including : (a) removal of all trash, debris, plastic and contaminated soil by off-site disposal; and (b) upon completion of surface grading, the soil surface shall be left in a roughened condition to negate wind and enhance water infiltration.

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Mining presents potential health risks; payment of any liabilities that arise from these health risks may adversely impact Round Top.

Complying with health and safety standards will require additional expenditure on testing and the installation of safety equipment. Moreover, inhalation of certain minerals can result in specific potential health risks. Symptoms of these associated diseases may take years to manifest. Symptoms of these diseases may take years to manifest. Failure to comply with health and safety standards could result in statutory penalties and civil liability. Round Top does not currently maintain any insurance coverage against these health risks. We do not currently maintain any insurance coverage against these health risks. The payment of any liabilities that arise from any such occurrences could have a material, adverse impact on Round Top. The payment of any liabilities that arise from any such occurrences would have a material, adverse impact on our Company.

There may be challenges to the title of the Round Top Project or any other mineral properties that we may acquire.

We expect that any additional properties to be acquired by Round Top or by us will be by unpatented claims or by lease from those owning the property. The lease of the Round Top Project property was issued by the State of Texas. The lease of our Round Top property was issued by the State of Texas. The validity of title to many types of natural resource property depends upon numerous circumstances and factual matters (many of which are not discoverable of record or by other readily available means) and is subject to many uncertainties of existing law and its application. We cannot assure you that the validity of Round Top’s titles to its properties or our title to properties we may purchase in the future will be upheld or that third parties will not otherwise invalidate those rights. We cannot assure you that the validity of our titles to our properties will be upheld or that third parties will not otherwise invalidate those rights. In the event the validity of Round Top’s or our titles with respect to any future properties are not upheld, such an event would have a material adverse effect on Round Top and us.

Increased competition could adversely affect our ability to attract necessary capital funding or acquire suitable producing properties or prospects for mineral exploration in the future.

The mining industry is intensely competitive. Significant competition exists for the acquisition of properties producing or capable of producing, REE or other metals. We may be at a competitive disadvantage in acquiring additional mining properties because we must compete with other individuals and companies, many of which have greater financial resources, operational experience and technical capabilities than us. We may also encounter increasing competition from other mining companies in our efforts to hire experienced mining professionals. Competition for exploration resources at all levels is currently very intense, particularly affecting the availability of manpower, drill rigs, mining equipment and production equipment. Increased competition could adversely affect our ability to attract necessary capital funding or acquire suitable producing properties or prospects for mineral exploration in the future.

We compete with larger, better capitalized competitors in the mining industry.

The mining industry is competitive in all of its phases, including financing, technical resources, personnel and property acquisition. We will require significant capital, technical resources, personnel and operational experience to effectively compete in the mining industry. Because of the high costs associated with exploration, the expertise required to analyze a project’s potential and the capital required to develop a mine, larger companies with significant resources may have a competitive advantage over us. We face strong competition from other mining companies, some with greater financial resources, operational experience and technical capabilities than us. As a result of this competition, we may be unable to maintain or acquire financing, personnel, technical resources or attractive mining properties on terms we consider acceptable or at all.

Current economic conditions and capital markets are subject to fluctuations which could adversely affect our ability to access the capital markets, and thus adversely affect our business and liquidity.

The current economic conditions are in a state of flux that could have a negative impact on our ability to access the capital markets, and thus have a negative impact on our business and liquidity. Our ability to access the capital markets has been and continues to be severely restricted at a time when we need to access such markets, which could have a negative impact on our business plans. Even if we are able to raise capital, it may not be at a price or on terms that are favorable to us. We cannot predict the occurrence of future financial disruptions or how long the current market conditions may continue.

Our resources may not be sufficient to manage our expected growth; failure to properly manage our potential growth would be detrimental to our business.

We may fail to adequately manage our anticipated future growth. Any growth in our operations will place a significant strain on our administrative, financial and operational resources, and increase demands on our management and on our operational and administrative systems, controls and other resources. We cannot assure you that our existing personnel, systems, procedures or controls will be adequate to support our operations in the future or that we will be able to successfully implement appropriate measures consistent with our growth strategy. As part of this growth, we may have to implement new operational and financial systems, procedures and controls to expand, train and manage our employee base, and maintain close coordination among our staff. We cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so, or that if we are able to do so, we will be able to effectively integrate them into our existing staff and systems.

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If we are unable to manage growth effectively, our business, operating results and financial condition could be materially adversely affected. As with all expanding businesses, the potential exists that growth will occur rapidly. If we are unable to effectively manage this growth, our business and operating results could suffer. Anticipated growth in future operations may place a significant strain on management systems and resources. In addition, the integration of new personnel will continue to result in some disruption to ongoing operations. The ability to effectively manage growth in a rapidly evolving market requires effective planning and management processes. We will need to continue to improve operational, financial and managerial controls, reporting systems and procedures, and will need to continue to expand, train and manage our work force.

We may experience difficulty attracting and retaining qualified management to meet the needs of our anticipated growth, and the failure to manage our growth effectively could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

Competition for additional qualified management is intense, and we may be unable to attract and retain additional key personnel, or to attract and retain personnel on terms acceptable to us. Management personnel are currently limited and they may be unable to manage our expansion successfully and the failure to do so could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. We have not entered into non-competition agreements. As our business is substantially dependent upon the directors, executive officers and consultants, the lack of non-competition agreements poses a significant risk to us in the event such persons were to resign or be terminated from such positions. Under such circumstances, such persons may provide confidential information and key contacts to our competitors and we may have difficulties in preventing the disclosure of such information. Such disclosure would have a material adverse effect on our business and operations.

Our operations are dependent upon key personnel, the loss of which would be detrimental to our business.

The nature of our business, including our ability to continue our exploration and development activities, depends, in large part, on the efforts of key personnel such as Daniel Gorski, our Chief Executive Officer. The loss of Mr. Gorski could have a material adverse effect on our business. We do not maintain “key man” life insurance policies on any of our officers or employees.

Risks Associated with our investment in Round Top

We have relied on an exclusion from the definition of “investment company” in order to avoid being subject to the Investment Company Act of 1940, or the 1940 Act. To the extent the nature of our business changes in the future, we may become subject to the requirements of the 1940 Act, which would limit our business operations and require us to spend significant resources in order to comply with such Act.

The 1940 Act defines an “investment company,” among other things, as an issuer that is engaged in the business of investing, reinvesting, owning, holding or trading in securities and owns investment securities having a value exceeding 40 percent of the issuer’s unconsolidated assets, excluding cash items and securities issued by the federal government. However, the 1940 Act excludes from this definition any person substantially all of whose business consists of owning or holding oil, gas or other mineral royalties or leases or fractional interests therein, or certificates of interest or participation relating to such mineral royalties or leases. We believe that we satisfy this mineral company exception to the definition of “investment company.” If our reliance on the mineral company exclusion from the definition of investment company is misplaced, we may have been in violation of the 1940 Act, the consequences of which can be significant. For example, investment companies that fail to register under the 1940 Act are prohibited from conducting business in interstate commerce, which includes selling securities or entering into other contracts in interstate commerce.

If in the future the nature of our business changes such that the mineral company exception to the threshold definition of investment company is not available to us, we will be required to register as an investment company with the SEC. The ramifications of becoming an investment company, both in terms of the restrictions it would have on our Company and the cost of compliance, would be significant. For example, in addition to expenses related to initially registering as an investment company, the 1940 Act also imposes various restrictions with regard to our ability to enter into affiliated transactions, the diversification of our assets and our ability to borrow money. If we became subject to the 1940 Act at some point in the future, our ability to continue pursuing our business plan would be severely limited as it would be significantly more difficult for us to raise additional capital in a manner that would comply with the requirements of the 1940 Act. To the extent we are unable to raise additional capital, we may be forced to discontinue our operations or sell or otherwise dispose of our mineral assets.

Failure to fund cash calls.

USARE, as manager, will issue monthly cash calls pursuant to adopted Budgets. Both parties, as members, will have 10 days after receipt of such a billing to meet the cash call. Failure to meet a cash call results in dilution; provided that successive failures in the same budgetary period can result in accelerated dilution or a default loan at a default interest rate. If we become a Delinquent Member and fail to contribute all or any portion of any additional capital contribution that we are required to contribute, then USARE may elect to contribute the Default Amount to Round Top, or not to contribute the Default Amount to Round Top and, in both cases, our membership interest will be recalculated. If the default by us is the second or any subsequent default during the period of any adopted Budget, USARE may elect to contribute the Default Amount to Round Top on behalf of us and to reduce our ownership interest by an amount (expressed as a percentage) equal to: (i) 150%; multiplied by the Default Amount; divided by (ii) the aggregate contributed capital of all members (determined after taking into account the contribution of the Default Amount on behalf of us). The interest of USARE will be increased by the reduction in the interest of us. Accordingly, in the event that the Company is unable to fund monthly cash calls pursuant to the adopted Budget, the Company’s percentage membership interest will be diluted. In accordance with the current Budget, the Company believes it has sufficient capital to fund its cash calls during the current fiscal year. Thereafter, at some point in the future, the Company will be required to raise additional capital to fund its cash call obligation or risk being diluted.

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Involuntary resignation as a result of dilution.

If the Company’s ownership interest is reduced through dilution to less than 5%, we will be deemed to have resigned from Round Top and will relinquish our ownership interest to Round Top, in exchange for the right to receive 5% of net proceeds, if any, from the sale of products by Round Top.

Certain matters that require unanimous management committee approval will not be applicable if the Company’s membership interest falls below 15% in Round Top.

Meetings will be held every three months unless otherwise agreed. For matters before the management committee that require a vote, voting is by simple majority except for certain “major decisions” that require a unanimous vote. So long as the Company maintains a 15% or greater ownership interest, the nine decisions identified in the bullet points below require unanimous approval. If the Company’s ownership interest falls below 15%, the number of unanimous decisions is reduced to five (being the first five bullet points below). If the Company is acquired by a REE mining company or sells its ownership int