Quiver Quantitative

Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - AIT

-New additions in green
-Changes in blue
-Hover to see similar sentence in last filing

$AIT Risk Factor changes from 00/08/17/21/2021 to 00/08/12/22/2022

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS.In addition to other information set forth in this report, you should carefully consider the following factors that could materially affect our business, financial condition, or results of operations. The risks described below are not the only risks facing the Company. Certain risks are identified below in Item 7 under the caption “Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” This information is incorporated here by reference. Additional risks not currently known to us, risks that could apply broadly to issuers, or risks that we currently deem immaterial, may also impact our business and operations. Risks can also change over time. Further, the disclosure of a risk should not be interpreted to imply that the risk has not already materialized. GENERAL ECONOMIC AND INDUSTRY RISKSOur business depends heavily on the operating levels of our customers and the factors that affect them, including general economic conditions. GENERAL ECONOMIC AND INDUSTRY RISKSOur business depends heavily on the operating levels of our customers and the factors that affect them, including general economic conditions. The markets for our products and services are subject to conditions or events that affect demand for goods and materials that our customers produce. Consequently, demand for our products and services has been and will continue to be influenced by most of the same factors that affect demand for and production of customers' goods and materials.When customers or prospective customers reduce production levels because of lower demand, increased supply, higher costs, supply chain or labor market disruptions, tight credit conditions, unfavorable currency exchange rates, adverse trade policies, foreign competition, other competitive disadvantage, offshoring of production, geopolitical instability, or other reasons, their need for our products and services diminishes.When customers or prospective customers reduce production levels because of lower demand, increased supply, higher costs, tight credit conditions, unfavorable currency exchange rates, adverse trade policies, foreign competition, other competitive disadvantage, offshoring of production, or other reasons, their need for our products and services diminishes. Selling prices and terms of sale come under pressure, adversely affecting the profitability and the durability of customer relationships, and credit losses may increase. Inventory management becomes more difficult in times of economic uncertainty. Volatile economic and credit conditions also make it more difficult for us, as well as our customers and suppliers, to forecast and plan future business activities.The extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic and measures taken in response thereto continue to impact our results of operations and financial condition will depend on future developments, which are uncertain and cannot be predicted.7Table of ContentsThe extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic and measures taken in response thereto continue to impact our results of operations and financial condition will depend on future developments, which are uncertain and cannot be predicted. The COVID-19 pandemic created significant volatility, uncertainty, and economic 7Table of Contentsdisruption. The COVID-19 pandemic created significant volatility, uncertainty, and economic disruption. The effects of the pandemic resulted in lost or delayed sales to us, and we experienced business disruptions as we modified our business practices (including travel, work locations, and cancellation of physical participation in meetings). While the pandemic’s impact on social and economic conditions in the U.S. has subsided, the extent to which it will continue to impact our results of operations and financial condition will depend on evolving factors that are uncertain and cannot be predicted, including the following: the duration, spread, and severity of the pandemic, particularly due to virus variants, in the countries in which we operate or otherwise in our supply chain; responsive measures taken by governmental authorities, businesses, and individuals; the effect on our customers and their demand for our products and services; the effect on our suppliers and disruptions to the global supply chain; disruptions to our ability to sell and provide our products and services and otherwise operate effectively, including as a result of travel restrictions and associates working from home; disruptions to our operations resulting from associate illness; restrictions or disruptions to, or reduced availability of, transportation; customers’ ability to pay for our services and products; closures of our facilities or those of our customers or suppliers; the impact of reduced customer demand on purchasing incentives we earn from suppliers; and how quickly and to what extent normal economic and operating conditions can resume. While the pandemic’s impact on social and economic conditions has subsided, the extent to which it will continue to impact our results of operations and financial condition will depend on evolving factors that are uncertain and cannot be predicted, including the following: the duration, spread, and severity of the pandemic, including due to virus variants, in the countries in which we operate; responsive measures taken by governmental authorities, businesses, and individuals; the effect on our customers and their demand for our products and services; the effect on our suppliers and disruptions to the global supply chain; our ability to sell and provide our products and services and otherwise operate effectively, including as a result of travel restrictions and associates working from home; disruptions to our operations resulting from associate illness; restrictions or disruptions to, or reduced availability of, transportation; customers’ ability to pay for our services and products; closures of our facilities or those of our customers or suppliers; the impact of reduced customer demand on purchasing incentives we earn from suppliers; and how quickly and to what extent normal economic and operating conditions can resume. In addition, the pandemic’s impact on the economy could affect the proper functioning of financial and capital markets, foreign currency exchange rates, product and energy costs, labor supply and costs, and interest rates.

The pandemic’s effects may also amplify the other risks and uncertainties described in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and may continue to adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, and/or stock price. The pandemic’s effects may also amplify the other risks and uncertainties described in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and may continue to materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, and/or stock price. Supply chain disruptions could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition. Our supply chain could be disrupted by natural or human-induced events or conditions, such as power or telecommunications outage, security incident, terrorist attack, war, other geopolitical events, public health emergency, earthquake, extreme weather events, fire, flood, other natural disasters, transportation disruption, labor actions, raw materials shortages, financial problems or insolvency, trade regulations or actions, inadequate manufacturing capacity or utilization to meet demand, or other reasons beyond our control. For example, the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted certain suppliers’ operations and our ability to procure product to meet customer demand fully and timely, and may continue to do so in the future. When we can find acceptable alternate sources for certain products, they may cost more. Impairment of our ability to meet customer demand could result in lost sales, increased costs, reduced profitability, and damage to our reputation.Consolidation in our customers' and suppliers' industries could adversely affect our business and financial results. Consolidation continues among our product suppliers and customers. As customer industries consolidate or customers otherwise aggregate their purchasing power, a greater proportion of our sales could be derived from large volume contracts, which could adversely impact margins. Consolidation among customers can produce changes in their purchasing strategies, potentially shifting blocks of business among competing distributors and contributing to volatility in our sales and pressure on prices. Similarly, continued consolidation among suppliers could reduce our ability to negotiate favorable pricing and other commercial terms for our inventory purchases. There can be no assurance we will be able to take advantage of consolidation trends.An increase in competition could decrease sales or earnings. We operate in a highly competitive industry. The industry remains fragmented, but is consolidating. The industry remains fragmented, but is consolidating. Our principal competitors are specialist and general line distributors of bearings, power transmission products, fluid power components and systems, flow control solutions, automation technologies, industrial rubber products, linear motion components, tools, safety products, oilfield supplies, and other industrial and maintenance supplies. These competitors include local, regional, national, and multinational operations, and can include catalog and e-commerce companies. Competition is largely focused in the local service area and is generally based on product line breadth, product availability, service capabilities, and price. Existing competitors have, and future competitors may have, greater financial or other resources than we do, broader or more appealing product or service offerings, greater market presence, stronger relationships with key suppliers or customers, or better name recognition. If existing or future competitors seek to gain or to retain market share by aggressive pricing strategies or sales methods, business acquisition, or otherwise through competitive advantage, our sales and profitability could be adversely affected. If existing or future competitors seek to gain or to retain market share by aggressive pricing strategies and sales methods, or otherwise through competitive advantage, our sales and profitability could be adversely affected. Our success will also be affected by our ability to continue to provide competitive offerings as customer preferences or demands evolve, for example with respect to product and service types, brands, quality, or prices. Technological evolution or other factors can render product and service offerings obsolete, potentially impairing our competitive position and our inventory values.Our operations outside the United States increase our exposure to global economic and political conditions and currency exchange volatility. Foreign operations contributed 13% of our sales in 2022. This presence outside the U.S. increases risks associated with exposure to more volatile economic conditions, political instability, cultural and legal differences in conducting business (including corrupt practices), economic and trade policy actions, and currency exchange fluctuations.8Table of ContentsOur foreign operations' results are reported in the local currency and then translated into U.Our foreign operations' results are reported in the local currency and then translated into U. S. dollars at applicable exchange rates for inclusion in our consolidated financial statements. Fluctuations in currency exchange rates affect our operating results and financial position, as well as the comparability of results between financial periods.STRATEGIC AND OPERATIONAL RISKSOur business could be adversely affected if we do not successfully execute our strategies to grow sales and earnings. We have numerous strategies and initiatives to grow sales, leveraging the breadth of our product offering, supplier relationships, and value-added technical capabilities to differentiate us and improve our competitive position. We also continually seek to enhance gross margins, manage costs, and otherwise improve earnings. Many of our activities target improvements to the consistency of our operating practices across our hundreds of locations. If we do not implement these initiatives effectively, or if for other reasons they are unsuccessful, our business could be adversely affected.Loss of key supplier authorizations, lack of product availability, or changes in distribution programs could adversely affect our sales and earnings. Our business depends on maintaining an immediately available supply of various products to meet customer demand. Many of our relationships with key product suppliers are longstanding, but are terminable by either party. The loss of key supplier authorizations, or a substantial decrease in the availability of their products (including due to supply chain disruptions, as noted above), could put us at a competitive disadvantage and have a material adverse effect on our business. The loss of key supplier authorizations, or a substantial decrease in the availability of their products, could put us at a competitive disadvantage and have a material adverse effect on our business. In addition, as a distributor, we face the risk of key product suppliers changing their relationships with distributors generally, or us in particular, in a manner that adversely impacts us.In addition, as a distributor, we face the risk of key product suppliers changing their relationships with distributors generally, or us in particular, in a manner that adversely impacts us. For example, key suppliers could change the following: the prices we must pay for their products relative to other distributors or relative to competing brands; the geographic or product line breadth of distributor authorizations; the number of distributor authorizations; supplier purchasing incentive or other support programs; product purchase or stocking expectations; or the extent to which the suppliers seek to serve end users directly. For example, key suppliers could change the following: the prices we must pay for their products relative to other distributors or relative to competing brands; the geographic or product line breadth of distributor authorizations; supplier purchasing incentive or other support programs; product purchase or stocking expectations; or the extent to which the suppliers seek to serve end users directly. The purchasing incentives we earn from product suppliers can be impacted if we reduce our purchases in response to declining customer demand. Certain product suppliers have historically offered to their distributors, including us, incentives for purchasing their products. In addition to market, customer account-specific, or transaction-specific incentives, certain suppliers pay incentives to the distributor for attaining specific purchase volumes during a program period. In addition to market or customer account-specific incentives, certain suppliers pay incentives to the distributor for attaining specific purchase volumes during a program period. In some cases, to earn incentives, we must achieve year-over-year growth in purchases with the supplier. When demand for our products declines, we may be less inclined to add inventory to take advantage of certain incentive programs, thereby potentially adversely impacting our profitability.Volatility in product, energy, labor, and other costs can affect our profitability.Volatility in product, energy, and other costs can affect our profitability. Product manufacturers may adjust the prices of products we distribute for many reasons, including changes in their costs for raw materials, components, energy, labor, and tariffs and taxes on imports. In addition, a portion of our own distribution costs is composed of fuel for our sales and delivery vehicles, freight, and utility expenses for our facilities. Labor costs are our largest expense. Our ability to pass along increases in our costs in a timely manner to our customers depends on execution, market conditions, and contractual limitations. Our ability to pass along increases in our product and distribution costs in a timely manner to our customers depends on execution, market conditions, and contractual limitations. Failing to pass along price increases timely in an inflationary environment, such as the current economic climate, or not maintaining sales volume while increasing prices, could significantly reduce our profitability. Failing to pass along price increases timely in an inflationary environment, or not maintaining sales volume while increasing prices, could significantly reduce our profitability. While increases in the cost of products, labor, or energy could be damaging to us, decreases in those costs, particularly if severe, could also adversely impact us by creating deflation in selling prices, which could cause our gross profit margin to deteriorate.While increases in the cost of products or energy could be damaging to us, decreases in those costs, particularly if severe, could also adversely impact us by creating deflation in selling prices, which could cause our gross profit margin to deteriorate. Changes in energy or raw materials costs can also adversely affect customers; for example, declines in oil, gas, and coal prices may negatively impact customers operating in those industries and, consequently, our sales to those customers.Changes in customer or product mix and downward pressure on sales prices could cause our gross profit percentage to fluctuate or decline. Because we serve thousands of customers in many end markets, and offer millions of products, with varying profitability levels, changes in our customer or product mix could cause our gross profit percentage to fluctuate or decline. Downward pressure on sales prices could also cause our gross profit percentage to fluctuate or decline. We can experience downward pressure on sales prices as a result of deflation, pressure from customers to reduce costs, or increased competition.Our ability to transact business is highly reliant on information systems. A disruption or security breach could materially affect our business, financial condition, or results of operation. We depend on information systems to, among other things, process customer orders, manage inventory and accounts receivable collections, purchase products, manage accounts payable processes, ship products to customers on a timely basis, maintain cost-effective operations, provide superior service to customers, conduct business communications, and compile financial 9Table of Contentsresults. A serious, prolonged disruption of our information systems, due to man-made or natural causes, including power or telecommunications outage, or breach in security, could materially impair fundamental business processes and increase expenses, decrease sales, or otherwise reduce earnings.Because of our reliance on information systems, we are vulnerable to the growing threat of damage or intrusion from computer viruses or other cyber-attacks, including ransomware and business e-mail compromise, on our systems. Despite precautions taken to prevent or mitigate the risks of such incidents, breaches of our systems could not only cause business disruption, but could also result in the theft of funds, the theft, loss, or disclosure of proprietary or confidential information, or the breach of customer, supplier, or employee information. Despite precautions taken to prevent or mitigate the risks of such incidents, breaches of our systems could not only cause business disruption, but could also result in the theft of funds, the theft, loss, or disclosure of 9Table of Contentsproprietary or confidential information, or the breach of customer, supplier, or employee information. A security incident involving our systems, or even an inadvertent failure to comply with data privacy and security laws and regulations, could negatively impact our sales, damage our reputation, and cause us to incur unanticipated legal liability, remediation costs, and other losses and expenses.Acquisitions are a key component of our anticipated growth. We may not be able to identify or to complete future acquisitions, to integrate them effectively into our operations, or to realize their anticipated benefits. Many industries we serve are mature. As a result, acquisitions of businesses have been important to our growth. While we wish to continue to acquire businesses, we may not be able to identify and to negotiate suitable acquisitions, to obtain financing for them on satisfactory terms, or otherwise to complete acquisitions. In addition, existing and future competitors, and private equity firms, increasingly compete with us for acquisitions, which can increase prices and reduce the number of suitable opportunities; the acquisitions they make can also adversely impact our market position.We seek acquisition opportunities that complement and expand our operations. However, substantial costs, delays, or other difficulties related to integrating acquisitions could adversely affect our business or financial results. For example, we could face significant challenges in consolidating functions, integrating information systems, personnel, and operations, and implementing procedures and controls in a timely and efficient manner.Further, even if we successfully integrate the acquisitions with our operations, we may not be able to realize cost savings, sales, profit levels, or other benefits that we anticipate from these acquisitions, either as to amount or in the time frame we expect. Our ability to realize anticipated benefits may be affected by a number of factors, including the following: our ability to achieve planned operating results, to reduce duplicative expenses and inventory effectively, and to consolidate facilities; economic and market factors; the incurrence of significant integration costs or charges in order to achieve those benefits; our ability to retain key product supplier authorizations, customer relationships, and employees; our ability to address competitive, distribution, and regulatory challenges arising from entering into new markets (geographic, product, service, end-industry, or otherwise), especially those in which we may have limited or no direct experience; and exposure to unknown or contingent liabilities of the acquired company. In addition, acquisitions could place significant demand on administrative, operational, and financial resources.An interruption of operations at our headquarters or distribution centers, or in our means of transporting product, could adversely impact our business. Our business depends on maintaining operating activity at our headquarters and distribution centers, and being able to receive and deliver product in a timely manner. A serious, prolonged interruption due to power or telecommunications outage, security incident, terrorist attack, war, public health emergency, earthquake, extreme weather events, other natural disasters, fire, flood, transportation disruption, or other interruption could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial results. A serious, prolonged interruption due to power or telecommunications outage, security incident, terrorist attack, public health emergency, earthquake, extreme weather events, other natural disasters, fire, flood, transportation disruption, or other interruption could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial results. FINANCIAL AND REPORTING RISKSOur indebtedness entails debt service commitments that could adversely affect our ability to fulfill our obligations and could limit or reduce our flexibility. As of June 30, 2022, we had total debt obligations outstanding of $689.5 million.4 million. Our ability to service our debt and fund our other liquidity needs will depend on our ability to generate cash in the future. Our debt commitments may (i) require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flows from operations to the payment of debt service, reducing the availability of our cash flow to fund planned capital expenditures, pay dividends, repurchase our shares, complete other acquisitions or strategic initiatives, and other general corporate purposes; (ii) limit our ability to obtain additional financing in the future (either at all or on satisfactory terms) to enable us to react to changes in our business or execute our growth strategies; and (iii) place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to businesses in our industry that have lower levels of indebtedness. Additionally, any failure to comply with covenants in the instruments governing our debt could result in an event of default. Any of the foregoing events or circumstances relating to our indebtedness may adversely affect our business, financial position, or results of operations and may cause our stock price to decline.Although the credit market turmoil of a decade ago did not have a significant adverse impact on our liquidity or borrowing costs, the availability of funds tightened and credit spreads on corporate debt increased. If credit market 10Table of Contentsvolatility were to return, obtaining additional or replacement financing could be more difficult and the cost of issuing new debt or replacing a credit facility could be higher than under our current facilities. If credit market volatility were to return, obtaining additional or replacement financing could be more difficult and the cost of issuing new debt or replacing a credit facility could be higher than under our current facilities. Tight credit conditions could limit our ability to finance acquisitions on terms acceptable to us.For more information regarding borrowing and interest rates, see the following sections below: “Liquidity and Capital Resources” in Item 7 under the caption “Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations;” Item 7A under the caption “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk;” and notes 6 and 7 to the consolidated financial statements, included below in Item 8 under the caption “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.For more information regarding borrowing and interest rates, see the following sections below: “Liquidity and Capital Resources” in Item 7 under the caption “Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations;” Item 7A under the caption “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk;” 10Table of Contentsand notes 6 and 7 to the consolidated financial statements, included below in Item 8 under the caption “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data. ” That information is incorporated here by reference.Our ability to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting may be insufficient to allow us to accurately report our financial results or prevent fraud, and this could cause our financial statements to become materially misleading and adversely affect the trading price of our common stock. We require effective internal control over financial reporting in order to provide reasonable assurance with respect to our financial reports and to effectively prevent fraud. Internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements because of its inherent limitations, including the possibility of human error, the circumvention or overriding of controls, or fraud. Therefore, even effective internal controls can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements. If we cannot provide reasonable assurance with respect to our financial statements and effectively prevent fraud, our financial statements could be materially misstated, which could adversely affect the trading price of our common stock.If we are not able to maintain the adequacy of our internal control over financial reporting, including any failure to implement required new or improved controls, or if we experience difficulties in their implementation, our business, financial condition and operating results could be harmed. Any material weakness could affect investor confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial statements. As a result, our ability to obtain any additional financing, or additional financing on favorable terms, could be materially and adversely affected. This, in turn, could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and the market value of our stock and require us to incur additional costs to improve our internal control systems and procedures. In addition, perceptions of the Company among customers, suppliers, lenders, investors, securities analysts, and others could also be adversely affected.Goodwill, long-lived, and other intangible assets recorded as a result of our acquisitions could become impaired. We review goodwill, long-lived assets, including property, plant and equipment and identifiable amortizing intangible assets, for impairment whenever changes in circumstances or events may indicate that the carrying amounts are not recoverable. Factors which may cause an impairment of long-lived assets include significant changes in the manner of use of these assets, negative industry or market trends, significant underperformance relative to historical or projected future operating results, or a likely sale or disposal of the asset before the end of its estimated useful life. In 2021, we recorded a $49.5 million non-cash charge for the impairment of certain intangible, lease, and fixed assets.As of June 30, 2022, we had remaining $563.2 million of goodwill and $250.1 million of goodwill and $279. 6 million of other intangible assets, net. We assess all existing goodwill at least annually for impairment on a reporting unit basis. The techniques used in our qualitative assessment and goodwill impairment tests incorporate a number of estimates and assumptions that are subject to change. Although we believe these estimates and assumptions are reasonable and reflect market conditions forecasted at the assessment date, any changes to these assumptions and estimates due to market conditions or otherwise may lead to an outcome where impairment charges would be required in future periods.We may be adversely affected by changes to interest rates on our borrowings.We may be adversely affected by changes in LIBOR reporting practices or the method by which LIBOR is determined. The U.K. Financial Conduct Authority, which regulates the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”), announced in 2017 that it will no longer persuade or require banks to submit rates for LIBOR after 2021. Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), which regulates LIBOR, announced in 2017 that it will no longer persuade or require banks to submit rates for LIBOR after 2021. At the end of 2021, the ICE Benchmark Administration, the administrator for LIBOR, ceased publishing one-week and two-month U.S. dollar LIBOR and will cease publishing all remaining U.S. dollar LIBOR tenors after June 30, 2023. Any of our LIBOR-based borrowings that extend beyond June 30, 2023 will need to be converted to a replacement rate prior to that date. Possible replacement rates include the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (SOFR). Uncertainty as to the nature of such phase out and selection of an alternative reference rate, together with disruption in the financial markets, could increase the cost of our indebtedness that is currently tied to LIBOR. GENERAL RISK FACTORSOur business depends on our ability to attract, develop, motivate, and retain qualified employees.GENERAL RISK FACTORSOur business depends on our ability to attract, develop, motivate, and retain qualified employees. Our success depends on hiring, developing, motivating, and retaining key employees, including executive, managerial, sales, professional, and other personnel. We may have difficulty identifying and hiring qualified personnel. In addition, we may have difficulty retaining such personnel once hired, and key people may leave and compete against 11Table of Contentsus. With respect to sales and customer service positions in particular, we greatly benefit from having employees who are familiar with the products and services we sell, and their applications, as well as with our customer and supplier relationships. The loss of key employees or our failure to attract and retain other qualified workers could disrupt or adversely affect our business. In addition, our operating results could be adversely affected by increased competition for employees, shortages of qualified workers, higher employee turnover (including through retirement as the workforce ages), or increased employee compensation or benefit costs.We are subject to legal, regulatory, and litigation risks, which may have a material adverse effect on our business. We are subject to a wide array of laws and regulations. We are subject to a wide array of laws and regulations. Changes in the legal and regulatory environment in which we operate, including with respect to taxes, international trade, employment laws, and data privacy, could adversely and materially affect the Company. In addition, from time to time, we are involved in lawsuits or other legal proceedings that arise from our business. These may, for example, relate to product liability claims, commercial disputes, personal injuries, or employment-related matters. In addition, we could face claims or additional costs arising from our compliance with regulatory requirements, including those relating to the following: our status as a public company; our government contracts; tax compliance; our engagement in international trade; and our collection, storage, or transmission of personal data. We maintain insurance policies that provide limited coverage for some, but not all, of the potential risks and liabilities associated with our business. The policies are subject to limits, deductibles, and exclusions that result in our retention of a level of risk on a self-insured basis. The defense and ultimate outcome of lawsuits or other legal proceedings or inquiries may result in higher operating expenses, the inability to participate in existing or future government contacts, or other adverse consequences, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations.12Table of ContentsITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.Not applicable..
Recently Filed
Click on a ticker to see risk factors
Ticker * File Date
GBRG 1 day, 4 hours ago
LGYV 1 day, 7 hours ago
ARRT 1 day, 8 hours ago
FGPR 1 day, 12 hours ago
UEC 2 days, 3 hours ago
CMTL 2 days, 4 hours ago
NXMH 2 days, 5 hours ago
PAXH 2 days, 5 hours ago
WNFT 2 days, 7 hours ago
WUYI 2 days, 15 hours ago
BNET 4 days, 6 hours ago
CBRL 4 days, 6 hours ago
NTWK 4 days, 6 hours ago
KTRA 4 days, 13 hours ago
NEOV 4 days, 13 hours ago
WINR 5 days, 2 hours ago
HFBL 5 days, 4 hours ago
GWRE 5 days, 4 hours ago
BDRY 5 days, 4 hours ago
WBQNL 1 week, 1 day ago
RSSS 1 week, 1 day ago
PBFS 1 week, 1 day ago
HITC 1 week, 1 day ago
GAXY 1 week, 1 day ago
INM 1 week, 1 day ago
DCI 1 week, 1 day ago
MJHI 1 week, 1 day ago
TRT 1 week, 1 day ago
RAVE 1 week, 1 day ago
SFIX 1 week, 3 days ago
NTNX 1 week, 3 days ago
NAII 1 week, 3 days ago
PLUR 1 week, 3 days ago
BIGN 1 week, 3 days ago
OFED 1 week, 4 days ago
NHMD 1 week, 4 days ago
AOSL 1 week, 4 days ago
AMTY 1 week, 5 days ago
SVMB 1 week, 5 days ago
BWAQ 2 weeks, 1 day ago
FLWS 2 weeks, 1 day ago
PVNC 2 weeks, 1 day ago
LPTH 2 weeks, 2 days ago
RZLT 2 weeks, 2 days ago
ZS 2 weeks, 2 days ago
BOWL 2 weeks, 2 days ago
CBKM 2 weeks, 2 days ago
WRPT 2 weeks, 2 days ago
ASTC 2 weeks, 2 days ago
IROQ 2 weeks, 2 days ago

OTHER DATASETS

House Trading

Dashboard

Corporate Flights

Dashboard

App Ratings

Dashboard