Quiver Quantitative

Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - OTEX

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$OTEX Risk Factor changes from 00/08/05/21/2021 to 00/08/04/22/2022

Item 1A. Risk Factors The following important factors could cause our actual business and financial results to differ materially from our current expectations, estimates, forecasts and projections. Risk FactorsThe following important factors could cause our actual business and financial results to differ materially from our current expectations, estimates, forecasts and projections.

These forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K or made elsewhere by management from time to time are subject to important risks, uncertainties and assumptions which are difficult to predict. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only risks and uncertainties facing us. Additional risks not currently known to us or that we currently believe are immaterial may also impair our operating results, financial condition and liquidity. Our business is also subject to general risks and uncertainties that affect many other companies. The risks discussed below are not necessarily presented in order of importance or probability of occurrence. Risks Related to our Business and IndustryIf we do not continue to develop technologically advanced products that successfully integrate with the software products and enhancements used by our customers, future revenues and our operating results may be negatively affectedOur success depends upon our ability to design, develop, test, market, license, sell and support new software products and services and enhancements of current products and services on a timely basis in response to both competitive threats and marketplace demands.18 If we do not continue to develop technologically advanced products that successfully integrate with the software products and enhancements used by our customers, future revenues and our operating results may be negatively affectedOur success depends upon our ability to design, develop, test, market, license, sell and support new software products and services and enhancements of current products and services on a timely basis in response to both competitive threats and marketplace demands. The software industry is increasingly focused on cloud computing, mobility, social media and SaaS among other continually evolving shifts. In addition, our software products, services and enhancements must remain compatible with standard platforms and file formats. Often, we must integrate software licensed or acquired from third parties with our proprietary software to create new products or improve our existing products. If we are unable to achieve a successful integration with third party software, we may not be successful in developing and marketing our new software products, services and enhancements. If we are unable to successfully integrate third party software to develop new software products, services and enhancements to existing software products and services, or to complete the development of new software products and services which we license or acquire from third parties, our operating results will be materially adversely affected. In addition, if the integrated or new products or enhancements do not achieve acceptance by the marketplace, our operating results will be materially adversely affected. Moreover, if new industry standards emerge that we do not anticipate or adapt to, or, if alternatives to our services and solutions are developed by our competitors in times of rapid technological change, our software products and services could be rendered less competitive or obsolete, causing us to lose market share and, as a result, harm our business and operating results and our ability to compete in the marketplace.Product development is a long, expensive and uncertain process, and we may terminate one or more of our development programsWe may determine that certain software product candidates or programs do not have sufficient potential to warrant the continued allocation of resources. Accordingly, we may elect to terminate one or more of our programs for such product candidates. If we terminate a software product in development in which we have invested significant resources, our prospects may suffer, as we will have expended resources on a project that does not provide a return on our investment, and may have missed the opportunity to have allocated those resources to potentially more productive uses, which may negatively impact our business, operating results and financial condition.Our investment in our current research and development efforts may not provide a sufficient or timely returnThe development of Information Management software products is a costly, complex and time-consuming process, and the investment in Information Management software product development often involves a long wait until a return is achieved on such an investment. We are making, and will continue to make, significant investments in software research and development and related product and service opportunities. Investments in new technology and processes are inherently speculative. Commercial success depends on many factors, including the degree of innovation of the software products and services developed through our research and development efforts, sufficient support from our strategic partners and effective distribution and marketing. Accelerated software product introductions and short product life cycles require high levels of expenditures for research and development. These expenditures may adversely affect our operating results if they are not offset by corresponding revenue increases. We believe that we must continue to dedicate a significant amount of resources to our research and development efforts in order to maintain our competitive position. However, significant revenues from new software product and service investments may not be achieved for a number of years, if at all. Moreover, new software products and services may not be profitable, and even if they are profitable, operating margins for new software products and services may not be as high as the margins we have experienced for our current or historical software products and services.18If our software products and services do not gain market acceptance, our operating results may be negatively affectedWe intend to pursue our strategy of being a market leading consolidator for cloud-based Information Management solutions.If our software products and services do not gain market acceptance, our operating results may be negatively affectedWe intend to pursue our strategy of being a market leading consolidator for cloud-based Information Management solutions, and grow the capabilities of our Information Management software offerings through our proprietary research and the development of new software product and service offerings, as well as through acquisitions. We intend to grow the capabilities of our Information Management software offerings through our proprietary research and the development of new software product and service offerings, as well as through acquisitions. It is important to our success that we continue to enhance our software products and services in response to customer demand and to seek to set the standard for Information Management capabilities. The primary market for our software products and services is rapidly evolving, and the level of acceptance of products and services that have been released recently, or that are planned for future release to the marketplace, is not certain. If the markets for our software products and services fail to develop, develop more slowly than expected or become subject to increased competition, our business may suffer. As a result, we may be unable to: (i) successfully market our current products and services; (ii) develop new software products and services and enhancements to current software products and services; (iii) complete customer implementations on a timely basis; or (iv) complete software products and services currently under development. In addition, increased competition and our transition from perpetual license sales to subscription-based business model could put significant pricing pressures on our products, which could negatively impact our margins and profitability. If our software products and services are not accepted by our customers or by other businesses in the marketplace, our business, operating results and financial condition will be materially adversely affected. If our software products and services are not 19 accepted by our customers or by other businesses in the marketplace, our business, operating results and financial condition will be materially adversely affected. Failure to protect our intellectual property could harm our ability to compete effectivelyWe are highly dependent on our ability to protect our proprietary technology. We rely on a combination of copyright, patent, trademark and trade secret laws, as well as non-disclosure agreements and other contractual provisions, to establish and maintain our proprietary rights. We intend to protect our intellectual property rights vigorously; however, there can be no assurance that these measures will, in all cases, be successful, and these measures can be costly and/or subject us to counterclaims, including challenges to the validity and enforceability of our intellectual property rights. We intend to protect our intellectual property rights vigorously; however, there can be no assurance that these measures will, in all cases, be successful, and these measures can be costly and/or subject us to counterclaims. Enforcement of our intellectual property rights may be difficult, particularly in some countries outside of North America in which we seek to market our software products and services. While Canadian and U.S. copyright laws, international conventions and international treaties may provide meaningful protection against unauthorized duplication of software, the laws of some foreign jurisdictions may not protect proprietary rights to the same extent as the laws of Canada or the United States. The absence of internationally harmonized intellectual property laws makes it more difficult to ensure consistent protection of our proprietary rights. Software piracy has been, and is expected to be, a persistent problem for the software industry, and piracy of our software products represents a loss of revenue to us. Where applicable, certain of our license arrangements have required us to make a limited confidential disclosure of portions of the source code for our software products, or to place such source code into escrow for the protection of another party. Despite the precautions we have taken, unauthorized third parties, including our competitors, may be able to copy certain portions of our software products or reverse engineer or obtain and use information that we regard as proprietary. Our competitive position may be adversely affected by our possible inability to effectively protect our intellectual property. In addition, certain of our products contain open-source software. Licensees of open-source software may be required to make public certain source code, to license proprietary software for free or to permit others to create derivative works of proprietary software. Licensees of open source software may be required to make public certain source code, to license proprietary software for free or to permit others to create derivative works of our proprietary software. While we monitor and control the use of open source software in our products and in any third party software that is incorporated into our products, and try to ensure that no open source software is used in such a way that negatively affects our proprietary software, there can be no guarantee that such use does not occur inadvertently, which in turn, could harm our intellectual property position and have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. Further, any undetected errors or defects in open source software could prevent the deployment or impair the functionality of our software products, delay the introduction of new solutions, or render our software more vulnerable to breaches or security attacks.Other companies may claim that we infringe their intellectual property, which could materially increase costs and materially harm our ability to generate future revenues and profitsClaims of infringement (including misappropriation and/or other intellectual property violation) are common in the software industry and increasing as related legal protections, including copyrights and patents, are applied to software products. Although most of our technology is proprietary in nature, we do include certain third party and open-source software in our software products. In the case of third-party software, we believe this software is licensed from the entity holding the intellectual property rights. In the case of third party software, we believe this software is licensed from the entity holding the intellectual property rights. While we believe that we have secured proper licenses for all material third-party intellectual property that is integrated into our products in a manner that requires a license, third parties have and may continue to assert infringement claims against us in the future. While we believe that we have secured proper licenses for all material third-party intellectual property that is integrated into our products in a manner that requires a license, third parties have and may continue to assert infringement claims against us in the future, including the sometimes aggressive and opportunistic actions of non-practicing entities whose business model is to obtain patent-licensing revenues from operating companies such as us. In particular, our efforts to protect our intellectual property through patent litigation may result in counterclaims of patent infringement by counterparties in such suits. Any such assertion, regardless of merit, may result in litigation or require us to obtain a license for the intellectual property rights of third parties. Such licenses may not be available, or they may not be available on commercially reasonable terms. In addition, as we continue to develop software products and expand our portfolio using new technology and innovation, our exposure to threats of infringement may increase. Any infringement claims and related litigation could be time-consuming and disruptive to our ability to generate 19revenues or enter into new market opportunities and may result in significantly increased costs as a result of our defense against those claims or our attempt to license the intellectual property rights or rework our products to avoid infringement of third-party rights. Typically, our agreements with our partners and customers contain provisions that require us to indemnify them for damages sustained by them as a result of any infringement claims involving our products. Any of the foregoing infringement claims and related litigation could have a material adverse impact on our business and operating results as well as on our ability to generate future revenues and profits.Our software products and services may contain defects that could harm our reputation, be costly to correct, delay revenues and expose us to litigationOur software products and services are highly complex and sophisticated and, from time to time, may contain design defects, software errors, hardware failures or other computer system failures that are difficult to detect and correct. Errors, defects and/or other failures may be found in new software products or services or improvements to existing products or services after delivery to our customers. If these defects, errors and/or other failures are discovered, we may not be able to successfully correct them in a timely manner. In addition, despite the extensive tests we conduct on all our software products or services, we may not be able to fully simulate the environment in which our products or services will operate and, as a result, we may be unable to adequately detect the design defects or software or hardware errors that may become apparent only after the products are installed in an end-user's network, and only after users have transitioned to our services. The occurrence of errors, defects and/or other failures in our software products or services could result in the delay or the denial of market acceptance of our products and alleviating such errors, defects and/or other failures may require us to make significant expenditure of our resources. Customers often use our services and solutions for critical business processes and, as a result, any defect or disruption in our solutions, any data breaches or misappropriation of proprietary information or any error in execution, including human error or intentional third-party activity such as denial of service attacks or hacking, may cause customers to reconsider renewing their contracts with us. The errors in or failure of our software products and services could also result in us losing customer transaction documents and other customer files, causing significant customer dissatisfaction and possibly giving rise to claims for monetary damages. The harm to our reputation resulting from product and service errors, defects and/or other failures may be material. Since we regularly provide a warranty with our software products, the financial impact of fulfilling warranty obligations may be significant in the future. Our agreements with our strategic partners and end-users typically contain provisions designed to limit our exposure to claims. These agreements regularly contain terms such as the exclusion of all implied warranties and the limitation of the availability of consequential or incidental damages. However, such provisions may not effectively protect us against claims and the attendant liabilities and costs associated with such claims. Any claims for actual or alleged losses to our customers’ businesses may require us to spend significant time and money in litigation or arbitration or to pay significant sums in settlements or damages. Defending a lawsuit, regardless of merit, can be costly and would divert management’s attention and resources. Although we maintain errors and omissions insurance coverage and comprehensive liability insurance coverage, such coverage may not be adequate to cover all such claims. Accordingly, any such claim could negatively affect our business, operating results or financial condition.Our software products rely on the stability of infrastructure software that, if not stable, could negatively impact the effectiveness of our products, resulting in harm to our reputation and businessOur development of Internet and intranet applications depends on the stability, functionality and scalability of the infrastructure software of the underlying intranet, such as the infrastructure software produced by Hewlett-Packard, Oracle, Microsoft and others. If weaknesses in such infrastructure software exist, we may not be able to correct or compensate for such weaknesses. If we are unable to address weaknesses resulting from problems in the infrastructure software such that our software products do not meet customer needs or expectations, our reputation, and consequently, our business, may be significantly harmed.Risks associated with the evolving use of the Internet, including changing standards, competition and regulation and associated compliance efforts, may adversely impact our businessThe use of the Internet as a vehicle for electronic data interchange (EDI) and related services currently raises numerous issues, including those relating to reliability, data security, data integrity and rapidly evolving standards.Risks associated with the evolving use of the Internet, including changing standards, competition, and regulation and associated compliance efforts, may adversely impact our businessThe use of the Internet as a vehicle for electronic data interchange (EDI) and related services currently raises numerous issues, including those relating to reliability, data security, data integrity and rapidly evolving standards. New competitors, including media, software vendors and telecommunications companies, offer products and services that utilize the Internet in competition with our products and services, which may be less expensive or process transactions and data faster and more efficiently. Internet-based commerce is subject to increasing regulation by Canadian, U.S. federal and state and foreign governments, including in the areas of data privacy and breaches and taxation. Laws and regulations relating to the solicitation, collection, processing or use of personal or consumer information could affect our customers’ ability to use and share data, potentially reducing demand for Internet-based solutions and restricting our ability to store, process, analyze and share data through the Internet. Although we believe that the Internet will continue to provide opportunities to expand the use of our products and services, we cannot guarantee that our efforts to capitalize on these opportunities will be successful or that 20increased usage of the Internet for business integration products and services, increased competition or heightened regulation will not adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.Business disruptions, including those arising from disasters or other catastrophic events, may adversely affect our operationsOur business and operations are highly automated, and a disruption or failure of our systems may delay our ability to complete sales and to provide services.Business disruptions, including those related to data security breaches, may adversely affect our operationsOur business and operations are highly automated, and a disruption or failure of our systems may delay our ability to complete sales and to provide services. Business disruptions can be caused by several factors, including climate change, natural disasters, terrorist attacks, power loss, telecommunications and system failures, computer viruses, physical attacks and cyber-attacks. Business disruptions can be caused by several factors, including natural disasters, terrorist attacks, power loss, telecommunications and system failures, computer viruses, physical attacks and cyber-attacks. A major disaster or other catastrophic event that results in the destruction or disruption of any of our critical business or information technology systems, including our cloud services, could severely affect our ability to conduct normal business operations. We operate data centers in various locations around the world and although we have redundancy capability built into our disaster recovery plan, we cannot ensure that our systems and data centers will remain fully operational during and immediately after a disaster or disruption. We also rely on third parties that provide critical services in our operations and despite our diligence around their disaster recovery processes, we cannot provide assurances as to whether these third-party service providers can maintain operations during a disaster or disruption. Furthermore, global climate change may aggravate natural disasters and increase severe weather events that affect our business operations, thereby compelling us to build additional resiliency in order to mitigate their impact. Furthermore, global climate change may aggravate natural disasters that affect our business operations, thereby compelling us to build additional resiliency in order to mitigate their impact. Any business disruption could negatively affect our business, operating results or financial condition.Unauthorized disclosures, cyber-attacks and breaches of data security may adversely affect our operationsMost of the jurisdictions in which we operate have laws and regulations relating to data privacy, security and protection of information.Unauthorized disclosures and breaches of data security may adversely affect our operationsMost of the jurisdictions in which we operate have laws and regulations relating to data privacy, security and protection of information. We have certain measures to protect our information systems against unauthorized access and disclosure of personal information and of our confidential information and confidential information belonging to our customers. We have policies and procedures in place dealing with data security and records retention. However, there is no assurance that the security measures we have put in place will be effective in every case. Breaches in security could result in a negative impact for us and for our customers, adversely affecting our and our customers' businesses, assets, revenues, brands and reputations and resulting in penalties, fines, litigation, regulatory proceedings, regulatory investigations, increase insurance premiums, remediation efforts, indemnification expenditures, lost revenues and/or other potential liabilities, in each case depending on the nature of the information disclosed. Security breaches could also affect our relations with our customers, damage our reputation and harm our ability to keep existing customers and to attract new customers. Some jurisdictions, including all U.S. states and the European Union (EU), have enacted laws requiring companies to notify individuals of data security breaches involving certain types of personal data, and in some cases our agreements with certain customers require us to notify them in the event of a data security incident. Such mandatory disclosures could lead to negative publicity and may cause our current and prospective customers to lose confidence in the effectiveness of our data security measures. These circumstances could also result in adverse impact on the market price of our Common Shares. These risks to our business may increase as we expand the number of web-based and cloud-based products and services we offer and as we increase the number of countries in which we operate.In particular, in connection with COVID-19, there has been a spike in cybers-attacks as shelter in place orders and work from home measures have led businesses to increase reliance on virtual environments and communications systems, which have been subjected to increasing third-party vulnerabilities and security risks.21 In particular, in connection with COVID-19, there has been a spike in cybersecurity attacks as shelter in place orders and work from home measures have led businesses to increase reliance on virtual environments and communications systems, which have been subjected to increasing third-party vulnerabilities and security risks. Malicious hackers may attempt to gain access to our network or data centers; steal proprietary information related to our business, products, employees and customers; or interrupt our systems and services or those of our customers or others. Although we monitor our networks and continue to enhance our security protections, hackers are increasingly more sophisticated and aggressive, and our efforts may be inadequate to prevent all incidents of data breach or theft. Furthermore, it is possible that the risk of cyber-attacks and other data security breaches or thefts to us or our customers may increase due to global geo-political uncertainty.In addition, if data security is compromised, this could materially and adversely affect our operating results given that we have customers that use our systems to store and exchange large volumes of proprietary and confidential information and the security and reliability of our services are of significant importance to these customers. We have experienced attempts by third parties to identify and exploit product and services vulnerabilities, penetrate or bypass our security measures and gain unauthorized access to our or our customers’ or service providers’ cloud offerings and other products and systems. We have experienced attempts by third parties to identify and exploit product and service vulnerabilities, penetrate or bypass our security measures, and gain unauthorized access to our or our customers' or service providers' cloud offerings and other products and systems. If our products or systems, or the products or systems of third-party service providers on whom we rely, are attacked or accessed by unauthorized parties, it could lead to major disruption or denial of service and access to or loss, modification or theft of our and our customers' data, which may require us to spend material resources on correcting the breach and indemnifying the relevant parties and/or on litigation, regulatory investigations, regulatory proceedings, increased insurance premiums, lost revenues, penalties, fines and/or other potential liabilities. Our efforts to protect against cyber-attacks and data breaches, including increased risks associated with work from home measures, may not be sufficient to prevent such incidents, which could have material adverse effects on our reputation, business, operating results and financial condition. Our efforts to protect against cyber-attacks and data breaches may not be sufficient to prevent such incidents, which could have material adverse effects on our reputation, business, operating results and financial condition. 21Our success depends on our relationships with strategic partners, distributors and third-party service providers and any reduction in the sales efforts by distributors, cooperative efforts from our partners or service from third party providers could materially impact our revenuesWe rely on close cooperation with strategic partners for sales and software product development as well as for the optimization of opportunities that arise in our competitive environment.Our success depends on our relationships with strategic partners, distributors and third party service providers and any reduction in the sales efforts by distributors, cooperative efforts from our partners or service from third party providers could materially impact our revenuesWe rely on close cooperation with strategic partners for sales and software product development as well as for the optimization of opportunities that arise in our competitive environment. A portion of our license revenues is derived from the licensing of our software products through third parties. Also, a portion of our service revenues may be impacted by the level of service provided by third party service providers relating to Internet, telecommunications and power services. Our success will depend, in part, upon our ability to maintain access to and grow existing channels of distribution and to gain access to new channels if and when they develop. Our success will depend, in part, upon our ability to maintain access to existing channels of distribution and to gain access to new channels if and when they develop. We may not be able to retain a sufficient number of our existing distributors or develop a sufficient number of future distributors. Distributors may also give higher priority to the licensing or sale of software products and services other than ours (which could include competitors' products and services) or may not devote sufficient resources to marketing our software products and services. The performance of third party distributors and third party service providers is largely outside of our control, and we are unable to predict the extent to which these distributors and service providers will be successful in either marketing and licensing or selling our software products and services or providing adequate Internet, telecommunication and power services so that disruptions and outages are not experienced by our customers. A reduction in strategic partner cooperation or sales efforts, a decline in the number of distributors, a decision by our distributors to discontinue the licensing of our software products or a decline or disruption in third party services could cause users and the general public to perceive our software products and services as inferior and could materially reduce our revenues. In addition, our financial results could be materially adversely affected if the financial condition of our distributors or third-party service providers were to weaken. Some of our distributors and third-party service providers may have insufficient financial resources and may not be able to withstand changes in business conditions, including economic weakness, industry consolidation and market trends. Some 22 of our distributors and third party service providers may have insufficient financial resources and may not be able to withstand changes in business conditions, including economic weakness, industry consolidation and market trends. The loss of licenses to resell or use third-party software or the lack of support or enhancement of such software could adversely affect our businessWe currently depend upon a limited number of third-party software products.The loss of licenses to use third-party software or the lack of support or enhancement of such software could adversely affect our businessWe currently depend upon a limited number of third-party software products. If such software products were not available, we might experience delays or increased costs in the development of our own software products. For a limited number of our product modules, we rely on software products that we license from third parties, including software that is integrated with internally developed software and which is used in our products to perform key functions. These third-party software licenses may not continue to be available to us on commercially reasonable terms and the related software may not continue to be appropriately supported, maintained or enhanced by the licensors. The loss by us of the license to use, or the inability by licensors to support, maintain or enhance any such software, could result in increased costs, lost revenues or delays until equivalent software is internally developed or licensed from another third party and integrated with our software. Such increased costs, lost revenues or delays could adversely affect our business. For example, with the recent acquisition of Zix, we extended our partnership with Microsoft by becoming one of their nine authorized Cloud Solutions Providers in North America. If our key partners were to terminate our relationship, make an adverse change in their reseller program, change their product offerings or experience a major cyber-attack or similar event, it could reduce our revenues and adversely affect our business.Current and future competitors could have a significant impact on our ability to generate future revenues and profitsThe markets for our software products and services are intensely competitive and are subject to rapid technological change and other pressures created by changes in our industry. The convergence of many technologies has resulted in unforeseen competitors arising from companies that were traditionally not viewed as threats to our market position. We expect competition to increase and intensify in the future as the pace of technological change and adaptation quickens and as additional companies enter our markets, including those competitors who offer solutions similar to ours, but offer it through a different form of delivery. Numerous releases of competitive products have occurred in recent history and are expected to continue in the future. We may not be able to compete effectively with current competitors and potential entrants into our marketplace. We could lose market share if our current or prospective competitors: (i) develop technologies that are perceived to be substantially equivalent or superior to our technologies; (ii) introduce new competitive products or services; (iii) add new functionality to existing products and services; (iv) acquire competitive products and services; (v) reduce prices; or (vi) form strategic alliances or cooperative relationships with other companies. If other businesses were to engage in aggressive pricing policies with respect to competing products, or if the dynamics in our marketplace resulted in increasing bargaining power by the consumers of our software products and services, we would need to lower the prices we charge for the products and services we offer. This could result in lower revenues or reduced margins, either of which may materially adversely affect our business and operating results. Moreover, our competitors may affect our business by entering into exclusive arrangements with our existing or potential customers, distributors or third-party service providers. Additionally, if prospective consumers choose methods of Information Management delivery different from that which we offer, our business and operating results could also be materially adversely affected.22The length of our sales cycle can fluctuate significantly which could result in significant fluctuations in revenues being recognized from quarter to quarterThe decision by a customer to license our software products or purchase our services often involves a comprehensive implementation process across the customer's network or networks. As a result, the licensing and implementation of our software products and any related services may entail a significant commitment of resources by prospective customers, accompanied by the attendant risks and delays frequently associated with significant technology implementation projects. Given the significant investment and commitment of resources required by an organization to implement our software products, our sales cycle may be longer compared to other companies within our own industry, as well as companies in other industries. Also, because of changes in customer spending habits, it may be difficult for us to budget, forecast and allocate our resources properly. In weak economic environments, it is not uncommon to see reduced information technology spending. It may take several months, or even several quarters, for marketing opportunities to materialize. If a customer's decision to license our software or purchase our services is delayed or if the implementation of these software products takes longer than originally anticipated, the date on which we may recognize revenues from these licenses or sales would be delayed. Such delays and fluctuations could cause our revenues to be lower than expected in a particular period and we may not be able to adjust our costs quickly enough to offset such lower revenues, potentially negatively impacting our business, operating results and financial condition.Our existing customers might cancel contracts with us, fail to renew contracts on their renewal dates and/or fail to purchase additional services and products, and we may be unable to attract new customers, which could materially adversely affect our operating resultsWe depend on our installed customer base for a significant portion of our revenues.23 Our existing customers might cancel contracts with us, fail to renew contracts on their renewal dates and/or fail to purchase additional services and products, and we may be unable to attract new customers, which could materially adversely affect our operating resultsWe depend on our installed customer base for a significant portion of our revenues. We have significant contracts with our license customers for ongoing support and maintenance, as well as significant service contracts that provide recurring services revenues to us. In addition, our installed customer base has historically generated additional new license and services revenues for us. Service contracts are generally renewable at a customer’s option and/or subject to cancellation rights, and there are generally no mandatory payment obligations or obligations to license additional software or subscribe for additional services.If our customers cancel or fail to renew their service contracts or fail to purchase additional services or products, then our revenues could decrease, and our operating results could be materially adversely affected. Factors influencing such contract terminations and failure to purchase additional services or products could include changes in the financial circumstances of our customers, including as a result of any potential recession, dissatisfaction with our products or services, our retirement or lack of support for our legacy products and services, our customers selecting or building alternate technologies to replace our products or services, the cost of our products and services as compared to the cost of products and services offered by our competitors, acceptance of future price increases by us, including due to inflationary pressures, our ability to attract, hire and maintain qualified personnel to meet customer needs, consolidating activities in the market, changes in our customers’ business or in regulation impacting our customers’ business that may no longer necessitate the use of our products or services, general economic or market conditions, or other reasons. Factors influencing such contract terminations and failure to purchase additional services or products could include changes in the financial circumstances of our customers, dissatisfaction with our products or services, our retirement or lack of support for our legacy products and services, our customers selecting or building alternate technologies to replace our products or services, the cost of our products and services as compared to the cost of products and services offered by our competitors, our ability to attract, hire and maintain qualified personnel to meet customer needs, consolidating activities in the market, changes in our customers’ business or in regulation impacting our customers’ business that may no longer necessitate the use of our products or services, general economic or market conditions, or other reasons. Further, our customers could delay or terminate implementations or use of our services and products or be reluctant to migrate to new products. Such customers will not generate the revenues we may have expected within the anticipated timelines, or at all, and may be less likely to invest in additional services or products from us in the future. We may not be able to adjust our expense levels quickly enough to account for any such revenue losses.Consolidation in the industry, particularly by large, well-capitalized companies, could place pressure on our operating margins which could, in turn, have a material adverse effect on our businessAcquisitions by large, well-capitalized technology companies have changed the marketplace for our software products and services by replacing competitors that are comparable in size to our Company with companies that have more resources at their disposal to compete with us in the marketplace. In addition, other large corporations with considerable financial resources either have products and/or services that compete with our software products and services or have the ability to encroach on our competitive position within our marketplace. These companies have considerable financial resources, channel influence and broad geographic reach; thus, they can engage in competition with our software products and services on the basis of price, marketing, services or support. These companies have considerable financial resources, channel influence, and broad geographic reach; thus, they can engage in competition with our software products and services on the basis of price, marketing, services or support. They also have the ability to introduce items that compete with our maturing software products and services. The threat posed by larger competitors and their ability to use their better economies of scale to sell competing products and/or services at a lower cost may materially reduce the profit margins we earn on the software products and services we provide to the marketplace. Any material reduction in our profit margin may have a material adverse effect on the operations or finances of our business, which could hinder our ability to raise capital in the public markets at opportune times for strategic acquisitions or for general operational purposes, which may then, in turn, prevent effective strategic growth or improved economies of scale or put us at a disadvantage to our better capitalized competitors.23We may be unable to maintain or expand our base of SMB and consumer customers, which could adversely affect our anticipated future growth and operating resultsWith the acquisitions of Carbonite and Zix, we have expanded our presence in the SMB market as well as the consumer market.We may be unable to maintain or expand our base of SMB and consumer customers, which could adversely affect our anticipated future growth and operating resultsWith the acquisition of Carbonite, we have expanded our presence in the SMB market as well as the consumer market. Expanding in this market may require substantial resources and increased marketing efforts, different to what we are accustomed to historically. If we are unable to market and sell our solutions to the SMB market and consumers with competitive pricing and in a cost-effective manner, it may harm our ability to grow our revenues and adversely affect our results of operations. In addition, SMBs frequently have limited budgets and are more likely to be significantly affected by economic downturns than larger, more established companies. In 24 addition, SMBs frequently have limited budgets and are more likely to be significantly affected by economic downturns than larger, more established companies. As such, SMBs may choose to spend funds on items other than our solutions, particularly during difficult economic times, which may hurt our projected revenues, business financial condition and results of operations.Our sales to government clients expose us to business volatility and risks, including government budgeting cycles and appropriations, early termination, audits, investigations, sanctions and penaltiesWe derive revenues from contracts with U.S. and Canadian federal, state, provincial and local governments and other foreign governments and their respective agencies, which may terminate most of these contracts at any time, without cause. and Canadian federal, state, provincial and local governments, and other foreign governments and their respective agencies, which may terminate most of these contracts at any time, without cause. There is increased pressure on governments and their agencies, both domestically and internationally, to reduce spending. Further, our U.S. federal government contracts are subject to the approval of appropriations made by the U.S. Congress to fund the expenditures under these contracts. Similarly, our contracts with U.S. state and local governments, Canadian federal, provincial and local governments and other foreign governments and their agencies are generally subject to government funding authorizations. Additionally, government contracts are generally subject to audits and investigations that could result in various civil and criminal penalties and administrative sanctions, including termination of contracts, refund of a portion of fees received, forfeiture of profits, suspension of payments, fines and suspensions or debarment from future government business.Geopolitical instability, political unrest, war and other global conflicts, including the Russia-Ukraine conflict, has affected and may continue to affect our businessGeopolitical instability, political unrest, war and other global conflicts may result in adverse effects on macroeconomic conditions, including volatility in financial markets, adverse changes in trade policies, inflation, higher interest rates, direct and indirect supply chain disruptions, increased cybersecurity threats and fluctuations in foreign currency. These events may also impact our decision or limit our ability to conduct business in certain areas or with certain entities. For example, in response to the Russia-Ukraine conflict, we have ceased all direct business in Russia and Belarus and with known Russian-owned companies. Sanctions and export controls have also been imposed by the United States, Canada and other countries in connection with Russia's military actions in Ukraine, including restrictions on selling or exporting goods, services or technology to certain regions, and travel bans and asset freezes impacting political, military, business and financial organizations and individuals in or connected with Russia. To support certain of our cloud customers headquartered in the United States or allied countries that rely on our network to manage their global business (including their business in Russia), we have allowed nonetheless these customers to continue to use our services to the extent that it can be done in strict compliance with all applicable sanctions and export controls.The risks discussed above would be increased to the extent that we engage in acquisitions that involve the incurrence of material additional debt, or the acquisition of businesses with material debt, and such incurrences or acquisitions could potentially negatively impact the ratings or outlook of the rating agencies on our outstanding debt securities and the market price of our common shares. However, as the situation develops and the regulatory environment continues to evolve, we may adjust our business practices as required by applicable rules and regulations. Our compliance with sanctions and export controls could impact the fulfillment of certain contracts with customers and partners doing business in these affected areas and future revenue streams from impacted parties and certain countries. While we do not expect our decision to cease all direct business in Russia and Belarus and with known Russian-owned companies to have a material adverse effect on our overall business, results of operations or financial condition, it is not possible to predict the broader consequences of this conflict or other conflicts, which could include sanctions, embargoes, regional instability, changes to regional trade ecosystems, geopolitical shifts and adverse effects on the global economy, on our business and operations as well as those of our customers, partners and third party service providers.The COVID-19 pandemic has and may continue to further negatively affect our business, operations and financial performanceIn March 2020, COVID-19 was characterized as a pandemic by the World Health Organization. Since December 2019, COVID-19 has spread globally, with a high concentration of cases in certain regions in which we sell our products and services and conduct our business operations, including the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia.The spread of COVID-19 and resulting tight government controls and travel bans implemented around the world, such as declarations of states of emergency, business closures, manufacturing restrictions and a prolonged period of travel, commercial and/or other similar restrictions and limitations, have caused disruption to global supply chains and economic activity. The spread of COVID-19 has had and is continuing to have an adverse impact on the global economy, the severity and duration of which is difficult to predict and has adversely affected and may continue to further adversely affect our financial performance, 24as well as our ability to successfully execute our business strategies and initiatives, including by negatively impacting the demand for our products and services, restricting our sales operations and marketing efforts, disrupting the supply chain of hardware needed to operate our SaaS offerings or run our business and disrupting our ability to conduct product development and other important business activities. The spread of COVID-19 has had and is continuing to have an adverse impact on the global economy, the severity and duration of which is difficult to predict, and has adversely affected and may continue to further adversely affect our financial performance, as well as our ability to successfully execute our business strategies and initiatives, including by negatively impacting the demand for our products and services, restricting our sales operations and marketing efforts, disrupting the supply chain of hardware needed to operate our SaaS offerings or run our business and disrupting our ability to conduct product development and other important business activities. While the restrictions and limitations noted above have and may continue to be relaxed or rolled back if COVID-19 abates and vaccination rates increase, COVID-19 cases (including the emergence and spread of more transmissible variants) continue to surge in certain parts of the world, including the U. While the restrictions and limitations noted above have and may continue to be relaxed or rolled back if COVID-19 abates and vaccination rates increase, they may be reinstated as the pandemic continues to evolve, including as a result of the impact of variants, and in response to actual or potential resurgences. S., and such restrictions and limitations may be reinstated as the pandemic continues to evolve, including as a result of the impact of variants, and in response to actual or potential resurgences. The scope and timing of any such reinstatement are difficult to predict and may materially affect our operations in the future. We are continuing to focus on the safety and protection of our employees and our customers by conducting business with modifications to employee travel, employee work locations and virtualization or cancellation of certain sales and marketing events, among other modifications. We are continuing to focus on the safety and protection of our workforce and our customers by conducting business with substantial modifications to employee travel, employee work locations and virtualization or cancellation of all sales and marketing events, which we expect to continue throughout calendar year 2021, among other modifications. To mitigate anticipated negative financial and operational impacts of COVID-19, we made a strategic decision to move towards a significant work from home model and we implemented certain restructuring activities to streamline our operations and significantly reduce our real estate footprint around the world. To mitigate anticipated negative financial and operational impacts of COVID-19, we implemented certain cost cutting measures, some of which have been restored, and approved our COVID-19 restructuring plan which includes a move towards a significant work from home model. In addition, as many local governments and officials have started lifting pandemic restrictions in accordance with the guidance of public health experts, in July 2022 we implemented a Flex-Office program in which a majority of our employees work a portion of their time in the office and a portion remotely. The transition to a flexible workforce may subject us to further operational challenges and risks, which may adversely affect our business, operations or financial performance. For more information regarding the impact of the Flex-Office program, see “We have implemented a Flex-Office program, which will subject us to certain operational challenges and risks.”We will continue to actively monitor the situation and may take further actions that alter our business operations as may be required by governments, or that we determine are in the best interest of our employees, customers, partners, suppliers and shareholders. The extent of the adverse impact of the pandemic on the global economy and markets will depend, in part, on the length and severity of the measures taken to limit the spread of the virus, including the distribution and effectiveness of vaccines and treatments, and, in part, on the size, effectiveness and duration of the compensating measures taken by governments and monetary authorities. To the extent the COVID-19 pandemic continues to adversely affect the global economy, and/or adversely affects our business, operations or financial performance, it may also have the effect of increasing the likelihood and/or magnitude of other risks described herein, including those risks related to market, credit, geopolitical and business operations and cybersecurity, or risks described in our other filings with the SEC and the applicable Canadian securities regulatory authorities. In addition, the COVID-19 pandemic may also affect our business, operations or financial performance in a manner that is not presently known to us. We are closely monitoring the potential adverse effects and impact on our operations, businesses and financial performance, including liquidity and capital usage, though the extent of the impact is difficult to fully predict at this time due to the rapid and continuing evolution of this uncertain situation.The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic continues to create significant uncertainty in the global economy and for our business, operations and financial performanceThe COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted health and economic conditions throughout the United States and globally.17 The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic continues to create significant uncertainty in the global economy and for our business, operations and financial performanceThe COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted health and economic conditions throughout the United States and globally. The global spread of COVID-19 has been, and continues to be, complex and rapidly evolving, with governments, public institutions and other organizations imposing or recommending, and businesses and individuals implementing, restrictions on various activities or other actions to combat its spread, such as travel restrictions and bans, social distancing, quarantine or shelter-in-place directives, limitations on the size of gatherings and closures of non-essential businesses. These restrictions have disrupted and may continue to disrupt economic activity, resulting in reduced commercial and consumer confidence and spending, increased unemployment, closure or restricted operating conditions for businesses, inflation, volatility in the global economy, instability in the credit and financial markets, labour shortages, regulatory recommendations to provide relief for impacted consumers and disruption in supply chains.The extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic impacts our business, operations and financial performance is highly uncertain and will depend on numerous evolving factors that we may not be able to accurately predict or assess, including, but not limited to, the severity, extent and duration of the pandemic or any resurgences in the future, any economic recession, the distribution and effectiveness of vaccines and treatments, and the continued governmental, business and individual actions taken in response to the pandemic.The extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic impacts our business, operations, and financial performance is highly uncertain and will depend on numerous evolving factors that we may not be able to accurately predict or assess, including, but not limited to, the severity, extent and duration of the pandemic or any resurgences in the future, including any economic recession resulting from the pandemic, the distribution and effectiveness of vaccines and treatments, and the continued governmental, business and individual actions taken in response to the pandemic. Impacts related to the COVID-19 pandemic are expected to continue to pose risks to our business for the foreseeable future, may heighten many of the risks and uncertainties identified herein, and could have a material adverse impact on our business, operations or financial performance in a manner that is difficult to predict.25The restructuring of our operations, including steps taken to mitigate the anticipated negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, may be ineffective and may adversely affect our business and our finances, and we may incur additional restructuring charges in connection with such actions We often undertake initiatives to restructure or streamline our operations, particularly during the period post-acquisition, as well as in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and as part of our return to office planning.The restructuring of our operations, including steps taken to mitigate the anticipated negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, may be ineffective and may adversely affect our business or our finances, and we may incur restructuring charges in connection with such actionsWe often undertake initiatives to restructure or streamline our operations, particularly during the period post-acquisition, and most recently in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. We may incur costs associated with implementing a restructuring initiative beyond the amount contemplated when we first developed the initiative, and these increased costs may be substantial. Additionally, such costs would adversely impact our results of operations for the periods in which those adjustments are made. We will continue to evaluate our operations and may propose future restructuring actions as a result of changes in the marketplace, including the exit from less profitable operations, the decision to terminate products or services that are not valued by our customers or adjusting our workforce. We will continue to evaluate our operations, and may propose future restructuring actions as a result of changes in the marketplace, including the exit from less profitable operations or the decision to terminate products or services that are not valued by our customers. Any failure to successfully execute these initiatives on a timely basis may have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition.In particular, in order to mitigate anticipated negative financial and operational impacts of COVID-19, we implemented certain cost cutting measures. This included our COVID-19 Restructuring Plan, which involved a move towards a significant work from home model and a reduction in our real estate footprint around the world. This includes our COVID-19 Restructuring Plan, which involves a move towards a significant work from home model and a reduction in our real estate footprint around the world. Further, as part of our return to office planning, during the third quarter of Fiscal 2022, we made a strategic decision to implement restructuring activities to streamline our operations and further reduce our real estate footprint around the world (Fiscal 2022 Restructuring Plan). Such steps to reduce costs, and further changes we may make in the future, may negatively impact our business, operations and financial performance in a manner that is difficult to predict.

For more information on our COVID-19 Restructuring Plan and our Fiscal 2022 Restructuring Plan, see Note 18 “Special Charges (Recoveries)” to our Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.We have implemented a Flex-Office program, which will subject us to certain operational challenges and risksIn response to the COVID-19 pandemic, our employees shifted from in-person to remote work. As many local governments and officials have started lifting pandemic restrictions in accordance with the guidance of public health experts, in July 2022 we implemented a Flex-Office program in which a majority of our employees work a portion of their time in the office and a portion remotely. As a result, we expect to continue to be subject to the challenges and risks of having a remote work environment, as well as new operational challenges and risks from having a flexible workforce. For example, employing a remote work environment could affect employee productivity, including due to a lower level of employee oversight, distractions caused by the pandemic and its impact on daily life, health conditions or illnesses, disruptions due to caregiving or childcare obligations or slower or unreliable Internet access.For example, employing a remote work environment could affect employee productivity, including due to a lower level of employee oversight, distractions caused by the pandemic and its impact on daily life, health conditions or illnesses, disruptions due to caregiving or childcare obligations or slower or unreliable Internet access. OpenText systems, client, vendor and/or borrower data may be subject to additional risks presented by increased cyber-attacks and phishing activities targeting employees, vendors, third party service providers and counterparties in transactions, the possibility of attacks on OpenText systems or systems of employees working remotely as well as by decreased physical supervision. OpenText systems, client, vendor and/or borrower data may be subject to additional risks presented by increased phishing activities targeting employees, vendors, third party service providers and counterparties in transactions, the possibility of attacks on OpenText systems or systems of employees working remotely as well as by decreased physical supervision. In addition, we may rely, in part, on third-party service providers to assist us in managing monitoring and otherwise carrying out aspects of our business and operations, and COVID-19 may affect their ability to devote sufficient time and resources to perform work for the Company. Such events may result in a period of business disruption or reduced operations, which could materially affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. While our controls prior to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic were not specifically designed to operate in a home environment, we believe that established internal controls over financial reporting continue to address all identified risk areas. While our pre-existing controls were not specifically designed to operate in our current work from home environment, we believe that established internal controls over financial reporting continue to address all identified risk areas. The transition to a flexible workforce may also subject us to other operational challenges and risks. For example, our shift to a Flex-Office program may adversely affect our ability to recruit and retain personnel who prefer a fully remote or fully in-person work environment. Operating our business with both remote and in-person workers, or workers who work on flexible schedules, could have a negative impact on our corporate culture, decrease the ability of our employees to collaborate and communicate effectively, decrease innovation and productivity, or negatively affect employee morale. In addition, we have incurred costs related to our return to office planning and the transition to a flexible workforce, including due to reducing our real estate footprint around the world. If we are unable to effectively transition to a flexible workforce, including due to potential future surges of COVID-19 causing reinstatements of governmental restrictions and/or other similar limitations, manage the cybersecurity and other risks of remote work, and maintain our corporate culture and employee morale, our financial condition and operating results may be adversely impacted.For more information regarding the impact of COVID-19 on our cybersecurity, see “Business disruptions, including those arising from disasters or other catastrophic events, may adversely affect our operations.For more information regarding the impact of COVID-19 on our cybersecurity, see "Business disruptions, including those related to data security breaches, may adversely affect our operations. ”26We must continue to manage our internal resources during periods of company growth, or our operating results could be adversely affectedThe Information Management market in which we compete continues to evolve at a rapid pace. However, there is significant uncertainty on growth from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, we have grown significantly through acquisitions in the past and expect to continue to review acquisition opportunities as a means of increasing the size and scope of our business. Our growth, coupled with the rapid evolution of our markets, has placed, and will continue to place, significant strains on our administrative and operational resources and increased demands on our internal systems, procedures and controls. Our administrative infrastructure, systems, procedures and controls may not adequately support our operations. In addition, our management may not be able to achieve the rapid, effective execution of the product and business initiatives necessary to successfully implement our operational and competitive strategy. If we are unable to manage growth effectively, our operating results will likely suffer, which may, in turn, adversely affect our business.If we lose the services of our executive officers or other key employees or if we are not able to attract or retain top employees, our business could be significantly harmedOur performance is substantially dependent on the performance of our executive officers and key employees and there is a risk that we could lose their services, including due to the illness of executive officers and key employees from COVID-19. We do not maintain “key person” life insurance policies on any of our employees. Our success is also highly dependent on our continuing ability to identify, hire, train, retain and motivate highly qualified management, technical, sales and marketing personnel. In particular, the recruitment and retention of top research developers and experienced salespeople, particularly those with specialized knowledge, remains critical to our success, including providing consistent and uninterrupted service to our customers. Competition for such people is intense, substantial and continuous, and we may not be able to attract, integrate or retain highly qualified technical, sales or managerial personnel in the future. In our effort to attract and retain critical personnel, and in responding to inflationary wage pressure, we may experience increased compensation costs that are not offset by either improved productivity or higher prices for our software products or services. In our effort to attract and retain critical personnel, we may experience increased compensation costs that are not offset by either improved productivity or higher prices for our software products or services. In addition, the loss of the services of any of our executive officers or other key employees could significantly harm our business, operating results and financial condition.Our compensation structure may hinder our efforts to attract and retain vital employeesA portion of our total compensation program for our executive officers and key personnel includes the award of options to buy our Common Shares. If the market price of our Common Shares performs poorly, such performance may adversely affect our ability to retain or attract critical personnel. In addition, any changes made to our stock option policies, or to any other of our compensation practices, which are made necessary by governmental regulations or competitive pressures, could adversely affect our ability to retain and motivate existing personnel and recruit new personnel. For example, any limit to total compensation that may be prescribed by the government or applicable regulatory authorities or any significant increases in personal income tax levels levied in countries where we have a significant operational presence may hurt our ability to attract or retain our executive officers or other employees whose efforts are vital to our success.

Additionally, payments under our long-term incentive plans (the details of which are described in Item 11 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K) are dependent to a significant extent upon the future performance of our Company both in absolute terms and in comparison to similarly situated companies. Any failure to achieve the targets set under our long-term incentive plan could significantly reduce or eliminate payments made under this plan, which may, in turn, materially and adversely affect our ability to retain the key personnel paid under this plan.Increased attention from shareholders, customers and other key relationships regarding our ESG practices could impact our business activities, financial performance and reputationShareholders, customers and other key relationships are placing a greater emphasis on ESG factors when evaluating companies for business and investment opportunities. We actively manage a broad range of ESG matters and annually publish a Corporate Citizenship Report regarding our policies and practices on a variety of ESG matters, including our: governance framework; community involvement; ED&I initiatives; employee health and safety; targets regarding greenhouse gas emissions, waste diversion and energy consumption; and practices relating to data privacy and information security. Our approach to and disclosure of ESG matters may result in increased attention from our shareholders, customers, employees, partners and suppliers, and such key relationships may not be satisfied with our approach to ESG as compared to their expectations and standards, which continue to evolve. Additionally, third-party organizations evaluate our approach to ESG, and an unfavorable rating from such organizations could lead to negative investor sentiment and reduced demand for our securities. See “Changes in the market price of our Common Shares and credit ratings of our outstanding debt securities could lead to losses for shareholders and debt holders.” The Company has disclosed the OpenText Zero-In Initiative, where we have committed to: (1) science-based GHG emissions target of 50% reduction by 2030, and net zero GHG emissions by 2040; (2) zero waste from operations by 2030; and 27(3) by 2030, a majority ethnically diverse staff, with 50/50 representation in key roles and 40% women in leadership positions at all management levels. Achieving our targets and ongoing compliance with evolving laws and regulatory requirements may cause us to reconfigure facilities and operations or adjust our existing processes. This could result in significant unexpected expenses, changes in our relationships with certain strategic partners, distributors and third-party service providers, loss of revenue and business disruption. We may not meet our goals which would have adverse effects on our reputation, business, operating results and financial condition. An adverse outcome of these ongoing audits could have a material adverse effect on our financial position and results of operations. Further, we may incur additional costs and require additional resources to be able to collect reliable emissions and waste data (in part, due to unavailable third-party data or inconsistent industry standards on the measurement of certain data), measure our performance against our targets and adjust our disclosure in line with market expectations. We may also incur additional compliance costs under evolving ESG-related regulations across the world, including in the EU, the U.S. and Canada. If we fail to meet our ESG targets or other ESG criteria set by third parties on a timely basis, or at all, or fail to respond to any perceived ESG concerns, our business activities, financial performance and reputation may be adversely affected. Risks Related to AcquisitionsAcquisitions, investments, joint ventures and other business initiatives may negatively affect our operating resultsThe growth of our Company through the successful acquisition and integration of complementary businesses is a critical component of our corporate strategy.Risks Related to AcquisitionsAcquisitions, investments, joint ventures and other business initiatives may negatively affect our operating resultsThe growth of our Company through the successful acquisition and integration of complementary businesses is a critical component of our corporate strategy. As a result of the continually evolving marketplace in which we operate, we regularly evaluate acquisition opportunities and at any time may be in various stages of discussions with respect to such opportunities. We plan to continue to pursue acquisitions that complement our existing business, represent a strong strategic fit and are consistent with our overall growth strategy and disciplined financial management. We may also target future acquisitions to expand or add functionality and capabilities to our existing portfolio of solutions, as well as to add new solutions to our portfolio. We may also consider, from time to time, opportunities to engage in joint ventures or other business collaborations with third parties to address particular market segments. These activities create risks such as: (i) the need to integrate and manage the businesses and products acquired with our own business and products; (ii) additional demands on our resources, systems, procedures and controls; (iii) disruption of our ongoing business; and (iv) diversion of management's attention from other business concerns. These activities create risks such as: (i) the need to integrate and 25 manage the businesses and products acquired with our own business and products; (ii) additional demands on our resources, systems, procedures and controls; (iii) disruption of our ongoing business; and (iv) diversion of management's attention from other business concerns. Moreover, these transactions could involve: (i) substantial investment of funds or financings by issuance of debt or equity or equity-related securities; (ii) substantial investment with respect to technology transfers and operational integration; and (iii) the acquisition or disposition of product lines or businesses. Also, such activities could result in charges and expenses and have the potential to either dilute the interests of existing shareholders or result in the issuance or assumption of debt, which could have a negative impact on the credit ratings of our outstanding debt securities or the market price of our Common Shares. Such acquisitions, investments, joint ventures or other business collaborations may involve significant commitments of financial and other resources of our Company. Any such activity may not be successful in generating revenues, income or other returns to us, and the resources committed to such activities will not be available to us for other purposes. In addition, while we conduct due diligence prior to consummating an acquisition, joint venture or business collaboration, such diligence may not identify all material issues associated with such activities. We may also experience unanticipated difficulties identifying suitable or attractive acquisition candidates that are available for purchase at reasonable prices. We may also experience unanticipated difficulties identifying suitable new acquisition candidates that are available for purchase at reasonable prices. Even if we are able to identify such candidates, we may be unable to consummate an acquisition on suitable terms or in the face of competition from other bidders. Even if we are able to identify such candidates, we may be unable to consummate an acquisition on suitable terms. Moreover, if we are unable to access capital markets on acceptable terms or at all, we may not be able to consummate acquisitions, or may have to do so on the basis of a less than optimal capital structure. Our inability: (i) to take advantage of growth opportunities for our business or for our products and services, or (ii) to address risks associated with acquisitions or investments in businesses, may negatively affect our operating results and financial condition. Additionally, any impairment of goodwill or other intangible assets acquired in an acquisition or in an investment, or charges associated with any acquisition or investment activity, may materially adversely impact our results of operations and financial condition which, in turn, may have a material adverse effect on the market price of our Common Shares or credit ratings of our outstanding debt securities.We may be unable to successfully integrate acquired businesses or do so within the intended timeframes, which could have an adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and business prospectsOur ability to realize the anticipated benefits of acquired businesses will depend, in part, on our ability to successfully and efficiently integrate acquired businesses and operations with our own. The integration of acquired businesses with our existing business will be complex, costly and time-consuming, and may result in additional demands on our resources, systems, procedures and controls, disruption of our ongoing business and diversion of management’s attention from other business concerns. Although we cannot be certain of the degree and scope of operational and integration problems that may arise, the difficulties and risks associated with the integration of acquired businesses may include, among others:•the increased scope and complexity of our operations;28•coordinating geographically separate organizations, operations, relationships and facilities;•integrating (i) personnel with diverse business backgrounds, corporate cultures and management philosophies, and (ii) the standards, policies and compensation structures, as well as the complex systems, technology, networks and other assets, of the businesses;•preserving important strategic and customer relationships;•retention of key employees;•the possibility that we may have failed to discover obligations of acquired businesses or risks associated with those businesses during our due diligence investigations as part of the acquisition, which we, as a successor owner, may be responsible for or subject to; and•provisions in contracts with third parties that may limit flexibility to take certain actions.As a result of these difficulties and risks, we may not accomplish the integration of acquired businesses smoothly, successfully or within our budgetary expectations and anticipated timetables, which may result in a failure to realize some or all of the anticipated benefits of our acquisitions.Loss of key personnel could impair the integration of acquired businesses, lead to loss of customers and a decline in revenues, or otherwise could have an adverse effect on our operationsOur success as a combined business with any prior or future acquired businesses will depend, in part, upon our ability to retain key employees, especially during the integration phase of the businesses. It is possible that the integration process could result in current and prospective employees of ours and the acquired business to experience uncertainty about their future roles with us, which could have an adverse effect on our ability to retain or recruit key managers and other employees. If, despite our retention and recruiting efforts, key employees depart, the loss of their services and their experience and knowledge regarding our business or an acquired business could have an adverse effect on our future operating results and the successful ongoing operation of our businesses.We may fail to realize all of the anticipated benefits of any acquisitions, including our acquisition of Zix, or those benefits may take longer to realize than expectedWe may be required to devote significant management attention and resources to integrating the business practices and operations of our acquisitions, including the acquisition of Zix. As we integrate our acquisitions, we may experience disruptions to our business and, if implemented ineffectively, it could restrict the realization of the full expected benefits. The failure to meet the challenges involved in the integration process and to realize the anticipated benefits of any acquisition could cause an interruption of, or loss of momentum in, our operations and could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. We expect competition to increase and intensify in the future as the pace of technological change and adaptation quickens and as additional companies enter our markets, including those competitors who offer solutions similar to ours, but offer it through a different form of delivery. Furthermore, as we integrate our acquisitions, including Zix, it may result in material unanticipated problems, expenses, charges, liabilities, competitive responses, loss of customers and other business relationships, and diversion of management’s attention. Additional integration challenges may include:•Difficulties in achieving anticipated cost savings, synergies, business opportunities and growth prospects from the acquisition;•Difficulties in the integration of operations and systems, including pricing and marketing strategies; and•Difficulties in conforming standards, controls, procedures and accounting and other policies, business cultures and compensation structures.Many of these factors will be outside of our control and any one of them could result in increased costs, including restructuring charges, decreases in the amount of expected revenues and diversion of management’s time and energy, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.Businesses we acquire may have disclosure controls and procedures and internal controls over financial reporting, cybersecurity and compliance with data privacy laws that are weaker than or otherwise not in conformity with oursWe have a history of acquiring complementary businesses of varying size and organizational complexity and we may continue to engage in such acquisitions. Upon consummating an acquisition, we seek to implement our disclosure controls and procedures, our internal controls over financial reporting as well as procedures relating to cybersecurity and compliance with data privacy laws and regulations at the acquired company as promptly as possible. Depending upon the nature and scale of the business acquired, the implementation of our disclosure controls and procedures as well as the implementation of our internal controls over financial reporting at an acquired company may be a lengthy process and may divert our attention from other 29business operations. Our integration efforts may periodically expose deficiencies in the disclosure controls and procedures and internal controls over financial reporting as well as procedures relating to cybersecurity and compliance with data privacy laws and regulations of an acquired company that were not identified in our due diligence undertaken prior to consummating the acquisition; contractual protections intended to protect against any such deficiencies may not fully eliminate all related risks. If such deficiencies exist, we may not be in a position to comply with our periodic reporting requirements and, as a result, our business and financial condition may be materially harmed.

Refer to Item 9A “Controls and Procedures”, included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, for details on our internal controls over financial reporting for recent acquisitions.Risks Related to Laws and Regulatory ComplianceOur provision for income taxes and effective income tax rate may vary significantly and may adversely affect our results of operations and cash resourcesSignificant judgment is required in determining our provision for income taxes. Various internal and external factors may have favorable or unfavorable effects on our future provision for income taxes, income taxes receivable and our effective income tax rate. These factors include, but are not limited to, changes in tax laws, regulations and/or rates, results of audits by tax authorities, changing interpretations of existing tax laws or regulations, changes in estimates of prior years' items, the impact of transactions we complete, future levels of research and development spending, changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets and liabilities, transfer pricing adjustments, changes in the overall mix of income among the different jurisdictions in which we operate and changes in overall levels of income before taxes. Furthermore, new accounting pronouncements or new interpretations of existing accounting pronouncements, and/or any internal restructuring initiatives we may implement from time to time to streamline our operations, can have a material impact on our effective income tax rate.Tax examinations are often complex as tax authorities may disagree with the treatment of items reported by us and our transfer pricing methodology based upon our limited risk distributor model, the result of which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. Although we believe our estimates are reasonable, the ultimate outcome with respect to the taxes we owe may differ from the amounts recorded in our financial statements, and this difference may materially affect our financial position and financial results in the period or periods for which such determination is made.

For more information on tax audits to which we are subject, see Note 14 “Guarantees and Contingencies” and Note 15 “Income Taxes” to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.For more information on tax audits to which we are subject, see notes 14 "Guarantees and Contingencies" and 15 "Income Taxes" to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. As part of the ongoing audit of our Canadian tax returns by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), we have received notices of, and are appealing, reassessments for Fiscal 2012, Fiscal 2013, Fiscal 2014, Fiscal 2015 and Fiscal 2016, and the CRA is auditing Fiscal 2017.As part of the ongoing audit of our Canadian tax returns by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), we have received notices of reassessment for Fiscal 2012, Fiscal 2013, Fiscal 2014, Fiscal 2015 and Fiscal 2016 and the CRA is currently auditing Fiscal 2017. An adverse outcome of these ongoing audits could have a material adverse effect on our financial position and results of operationsAs part of its ongoing audit of our Canadian tax returns, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has disputed our transfer pricing methodology used for certain intercompany transactions with our international subsidiaries and has issued notices of reassessment for Fiscal 2012, Fiscal 2013, Fiscal 2014, Fiscal 2015 and Fiscal 2016. Assuming the utilization of available tax attributes (further described below), we estimate our potential aggregate liability, as of June 30, 2022, in connection with the CRA's reassessments for Fiscal 2012, Fiscal 2013, Fiscal 2014, Fiscal 2015 and Fiscal 2016, to be limited to penalties, interest and provincial taxes that may be due of approximately $75 million. As of June 30, 2022, we have provisionally paid approximately $34 million in order to fully preserve our rights to object to the CRA's audit positions, being the minimum payment required under Canadian legislation while the matter is in dispute. This amount is recorded within “Long-term income taxes recoverable” on the Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2022. This amount is recorded within “Long-term income taxes recoverable” on our Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2021. The notices of reassessment for Fiscal 2012, Fiscal 2013, Fiscal 2014, Fiscal 2015 and Fiscal 2016 would, as drafted, increase our taxable income by approximately $90 million to $100 million for each of those years, as well as impose a 10% penalty on the proposed adjustment to income. Audits by the CRA of our tax returns for fiscal years prior to Fiscal 2012 have been completed with no reassessment of our income tax liability.We strongly disagree with the CRA's positions and believe the reassessments of Fiscal 2012, Fiscal 2013, Fiscal 2014, Fiscal 2015 and Fiscal 2016 (including any penalties) are without merit, and we are continuing to contest these reassessments.We strongly disagree with the CRA’s positions and believe the reassessments of Fiscal 2012, Fiscal 2013, Fiscal 2014, Fiscal 2015 and Fiscal 2016 (including any penalties) are without merit. On June 30, 2022, we filed a notice of appeal with the Tax Court of Canada seeking to reverse all such reassessments (including any penalties) in full.Even if we are unsuccessful in challenging the CRA's reassessments to increase our taxable income for Fiscal 2012, Fiscal 2013, Fiscal 2014, Fiscal 2015 and Fiscal 2016, we have elective deductions available for those years (including carry-backs from later years) that would offset such increased amounts so that no additional cash tax would be payable, exclusive of any assessed penalties and interest, as described above.The CRA has also audited Fiscal 2017 on a basis that we strongly disagree with and are contesting. The focus of the CRA audit has been the valuation of certain intellectual property and goodwill when one of our subsidiaries continued into Canada 30from Luxembourg in July 2016. In accordance with applicable rules, these assets were recognized for tax purposes at fair market value as of that time, which value was supported by an expert valuation prepared by an independent leading accounting and advisory firm. In conjunction with the Fiscal 2017 audit, the CRA issued a proposal letter dated April 7, 2021 (Proposal Letter) indicating to us that it proposes to reassess our Fiscal 2017 tax year to reduce the depreciable basis of these assets. In conjunction with the Fiscal 2017 audit, the CRA issued a proposal letter dated April 7, 2021 (Proposal Letter) indicating to us that it proposes to reduce the depreciable basis of these assets. We have made extensive submissions in support of our position. CRA’s position for Fiscal 2017 relies in significant part on the application of its positions regarding our transfer pricing methodology that are the basis for its reassessment of our fiscal years 2012 to 2016 described above, and that we believe are without merit. CRA’s currently-proposed position for Fiscal 2017 relies in significant part on the application of its positions regarding our transfer pricing methodology that are the basis for its reassessment of our fiscal years 2012 to 2016 described above, and that we believe are without merit. Other aspects of CRA’s position for Fiscal 2017 conflict with the expert valuation prepared by the independent leading accounting and advisory firm that was used to support our original filing position. Other aspects of CRA’s currently-proposed position for Fiscal 2017 conflict with the expert valuation prepared by the independent leading accounting and advisory firm that was used to support our original filing position. On January 27, 2022, the CRA issued a notice of reassessment in respect of Fiscal 2017 on the basis of its position set forth in the Proposal Letter. On April 19, 2022, we filed our notice of objection regarding the reassessment in respect of Fiscal 2017. If we are ultimately unsuccessful in defending our position, the estimated impact of the proposed adjustment could result in us recording an income tax expense, with no immediate cash payment, to reduce the stated value of our deferred tax assets of up to approximately $470 million. Any such income tax expense could also have a corresponding cash tax impact that would primarily occur over a period of several future years based upon annual income realization in Canada. We strongly disagree with the CRA’s position for Fiscal 2017 and intend to vigorously defend our original filing position, We are not required to provisionally pay any cash amounts to the CRA as a result of the reassessment in respect of Fiscal 2017 due to the utilization of available tax attributes; however, to the extent the CRA reassesses subsequent fiscal years on a similar basis, we expect to make certain minimum payments required under Canadian legislation, which may need to be provisionally made starting in Fiscal 2024 while the matter is in dispute. We will continue to vigorously contest the adjustments to our taxable income and any penalty and interest assessments, as well as any reduction to the basis of our depreciable property.We will continue to vigorously contest the proposed adjustments to our taxable income and any penalty and interest assessments, as well as any proposed reduction to the basis of our depreciable property. We are confident that our original tax filing positions were appropriate.

Accordingly, as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, we have not recorded any accruals in respect of these reassessments or proposed reassessment in our Consolidated Financial Statements. The CRA is currently in preliminary stages of auditing Fiscal 2018 and Fiscal 2019.

For further details on these and other tax audits to which we are subject, see Note 14 “Guarantees and Contingencies” and Note 15 “Income Taxes” to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.For further details on these and other tax audits to which we are subject, see notes 14 “Guarantees and Contingencies” and 15 “Income Taxes” to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Risks associated with data privacy issues, including evolving laws and regulations and associated compliance efforts, may adversely impact our businessOur business depends on the processing of personal data, including data transfer between our affiliated entities, to and from our business partners and customers, and with third-party service providers. The laws and regulations relating to personal data are constantly evolving, as federal, state and foreign governments continue to adopt new measures addressing data privacy and processing (including collection, storage, transfer, disposal and use) of personal data. The laws and regulations relating to personal data constantly evolve, as federal, state and foreign governments continue to adopt new measures addressing data privacy and processing (including collection, storage, transfer, disposal and use) of personal data. Moreover, the interpretation and application of many existing or recently enacted privacy and data protection laws and regulations in the EU, United Kingdom, the U.S. and elsewhere are uncertain and fluid, and it is possible that such laws and regulations may be interpreted or applied in a manner that is inconsistent with our existing data management practices or the features of our products and services. Any such new laws or regulations, any changes to existing laws and regulations and any such interpretation or application may affect demand for our products and services, impact our ability to effectively transfer data across borders in support of our business operations or increase the cost of providing our products and services. Additionally, any actual or perceived breach of such laws or regulations may subject us to claims and may lead to administrative, civil or criminal liability, as well as reputational harm to our Company and our employees. We could also be required to fundamentally change our business activities and practices, or modify our products and services, which could have an adverse effect on our business.In the U.S., various laws and regulations apply to the collection, processing, transfer, disposal, unauthorized disclosure and security of personal data. For example, data protection laws passed by all states within the U.S. require notification to users when there is a security breach for personal data. Additionally, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and many state attorneys general are interpreting federal and state consumer protection laws as imposing standards for the online collection, use, transfer and security of data. The U.S. Congress and state legislatures, along with federal regulatory authorities, have recently increased their attention to matters concerning personal data, and this has and may continue to result in new legislation which could increase the cost of compliance. Congress and state legislatures, along with federal regulatory authorities, have recently increased their attention to matters concerning personal data, and this may result in new legislation which could increase the cost of compliance. For example, the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA) came into effect on January 1, 2020. The CCPA requires companies that process information of California residents to make new disclosures to consumers about their data collection, use and sharing practices, allows consumers to access and request deletion of their data and opt out of certain data sharing with third parties and provides a new private right of action for data breaches. The CCPA requires companies that process information of California residents to make new disclosures to consumers about their 28 data collection, use and sharing practices, allows consumers to access and request deletion of their data and opt out of certain data sharing with third parties and provides a new private right of action for data breaches. Violations of the CCPA are enforced by the California Attorney General with sizeable civil penalties, particularly for violations that impact large numbers of consumers. Further, in November 2020, California voters passed the California Privacy Rights and Enforcement Act of 2020 (CPRA), which significantly modifies the CCPA with additional data privacy compliance requirements, expands consumers' rights with respect to certain sensitive personal information and establishes a regulatory agency dedicated to enforcing the requirements of the CCPA and CPRA. It remains unclear how various provisions of the 31CCPA and CPRA will be interpreted and enforced when CPRA comes into effect in most material respects on January 1, 2023. It remains unclear how various provisions of the CCPA and CPRA will be interpreted and enforced. Virginia, Colorado, Utah and Connecticut have similarly passed broad laws relating to privacy, data protection and information security, further complicating our privacy compliance obligations through the introduction of increasingly disparate requirements across the various U.S. jurisdictions in which we operate. In addition to government regulation, privacy advocacy and industry groups may propose new and different self-regulatory standards that either legally or contractually apply to us or our clients.Some of our operations are subject to the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (the EU GDPR), which took effect from May 25, 2018, the General Data Protection Regulation as it forms part of retained EU law in the United Kingdom by virtue of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 and as amended by the Data Protection, Privacy and Electronic Communications (Amendments etc) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019 (SI 2019/419) (the UK GDPR, and together with the EU GDPR, the GDPR), and the UK Data Protection Act 2018. The GDPR imposes a number of obligations for subject companies, and we will need to continue dedicating financial resources and management time to GDPR compliance. The GDPR introduces a number of new obligations for subject companies and we will need to continue dedicating financial resources and management time to GDPR compliance. The GDPR enhances the obligations placed on companies that control or process personal data including, for example, expanded disclosures about how personal data is to be used, mechanisms for obtaining consent from data subjects, controls for data subjects with respect to their personal data (including by enabling them to exercise rights to erasure and data portability), limitations on retention of personal data and mandatory data breach notifications. The GDPR enhances the obligations placed on companies that control or process personal data including, for example, expanded disclosures about how personal data is to be used, new mechanisms for obtaining consent from data subjects, new controls for data subjects with respect to their personal data (including by enabling them to exercise rights to erasure and data portability), limitations on retention of personal data and mandatory data breach notifications. Additionally, the GDPR places companies under obligations relating to data transfers and the security of the personal data they process. Additionally, the GDPR places companies under new obligations relating to data transfers and the security of the personal data they process. The GDPR provides that supervisory authorities in the EU and the United Kingdom may impose administrative fines for certain infringements of the GDPR of up to EUR 20,000,000 under the EU GDPR (or GBP 17,500,000 under the UK GDPR), or 4% of an undertaking’s total, worldwide, annual turnover of the preceding financial year, whichever is higher. The GDPR provides that supervisory authorities in the European Union may impose administrative fines for certain infringements of the GDPR of up to EUR 20,000,000, or 4% of an undertaking’s total, worldwide, annual turnover of the preceding financial year, whichever is higher. Individuals who have suffered damage as a result of a subject company’s non-compliance with the GDPR also have the right to seek compensation from such company. Given the breadth of the GDPR, compliance with its requirements is likely to continue to require significant expenditure of resources on an ongoing basis, and there can be no assurance that the measures we have taken for the purposes of compliance will be successful in preventing violation of the GDPR. Given the potential fines, liabilities and damage to our reputation in the event of an actual or perceived violation of the GDPR, such a violation may have a material adverse effect on our business and operations. In addition, the GDPR restricts transfers of personal data outside of the European Economical Area (EEA) and the United Kingdom to third countries deemed to lack adequate privacy protections unless an appropriate safeguard is implemented. In light of the July 2020 decision of the Court of Justice of the European Union in Data Protection Commissioner vs Facebook Ireland Limited and Maximillian Schrems (C-311/118) (Schrems II) invalidating the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield Framework, there is potential uncertainty with respect to the legality of certain transfers of personal data from the European Economic Area (EEA) and the United Kingdom to so-called “third countries” outside the EEA, including the U.S. and Canada. In addition to the increased legal risk in the event of any such transfers, additional costs might also need to be incurred in order to implement necessary safeguards to comply with GDPR. While the Court of Justice of the European Union upheld the adequacy of the old standard contractual clauses (SCCs), a standard form of contract approved by the European Commission as an adequate personal data transfer mechanism, it made clear that reliance on them alone may not necessarily be sufficient in all circumstances. In June 2021, the European Commission issued new SCCs that must be used for relevant new data transfers, and existing SCCs must be migrated to the new SCCs by December 27, 2022. At the same time, the United Kingdom’s Information Commissioner’s Office released two new agreements governing international data transfers out of the United Kingdom that can be used from March 21, 2022: the International Data Transfer Agreement (IDTA) and the Data Transfer Addendum (Addendum). All existing contracts and any new contracts signed before September 21, 2022 can continue to use the old SCCs until March 21, 2024, after which the old SCCs must be replaced by either the IDTA or the Addendum in conjunction with the new SCCs. All contracts signed after September 21, 2022 must use either the IDTA or the Addendum in conjunction with the new SCCs. Additionally, on March 25, 2022, the U.S. and European Commission announced that they had agreed in principle to a new “Trans-Atlantic Data Privacy Framework” to enable trans-Atlantic data flows and address the concerns raised in the Schrems II decision.Outside of the U.S., the EU and the United Kingdom, many jurisdictions have adopted or are adopting new data privacy laws that may impose further onerous compliance requirements, such as data localization, which prohibits companies from storing and/or processing outside the jurisdiction data relating to resident individuals. and the European Union, many jurisdictions have adopted or are adopting new data privacy laws that may impose further onerous compliance requirements, such as data localization, which prohibits companies from storing and/or processing outside the jurisdiction data relating to resident individuals. The proliferation of such laws within the jurisdictions in which we operate may result in conflicting and contradictory requirements, particularly in relation to evolving technologies such as cloud computing. Any failure to successfully navigate the changing regulatory landscape could result in legal liability or impairment to our reputation in the marketplace, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.Privacy-related claims or lawsuits initiated by governmental bodies, customers or other third parties, whether meritorious or not, could be time consuming, result in costly regulatory proceedings, litigation, penalties, fines, or other potential liabilities, or require us to change our business practices, sometimes in expensive ways. Unfavorable publicity regarding our privacy practices could damage our reputation, harm our ability to keep existing customers or attract new customers or otherwise adversely affect our business, assets, revenue and brands.32Certain of our products may be perceived as, or determined by the courts to be, a violation of privacy rights and related laws. Any such perception or determination could adversely affect our revenues and results of operationsBecause of the nature of certain of our products, including those relating to digital investigations, potential customers and purchasers of our products or the general public may perceive that the use of these products results in violations of individual privacy rights. In addition, certain courts or regulatory authorities could determine that the use of our software solutions or other products is a violation of privacy laws, particularly in jurisdictions outside of the United States. Any such determination or perception by potential customers and purchasers, the general public, government entities or the judicial system could harm our reputation and adversely affect our revenues and results of operations.Risks Related to our Financial ConditionWe may not generate sufficient cash flow to satisfy our unfunded pension obligationsThrough our acquisitions, we have assumed certain unfunded pension plan liabilities.29 Risks Related to our Financial ConditionWe may not generate sufficient cash flow to satisfy our unfunded pension obligationsThrough our acquisitions, we have assumed certain unfunded pension plan liabilities. We will be required to use the operating cash flow that we generate in the future to meet these obligations. As a result, our future net pension liability and cost may be materially affected by the discount rate used to measure these pension obligations and by the longevity and actuarial profile of the relevant workforce. A change in the discount rate may result in a significant increase or decrease in the valuation of these pension obligations, and these changes may affect the net periodic pension cost in the year the change is made and in subsequent years. We cannot assure that we will generate sufficient cash flow to satisfy these obligations. Any inability to satisfy these pension obligations may have a material adverse effect on the operational and financial health of our business.

For more information on our pension obligations, see Note 12 “Pension Plans and Other Post Retirement Benefits” to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.For more information on our pension obligations, see note 12 "Pension Plans and Other Post Retirement Benefits" to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates could materially affect our financial resultsOur Consolidated Financial Statements are presented in U.S. dollars. In general, the functional currency of our subsidiaries is the local currency. For each subsidiary, assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are translated into U.S dollars at the exchange rates in effect at the balance sheet dates and revenues and expenses are translated at the average exchange rates prevailing during the month of the transaction. Therefore, increases or decreases in the value of the U.S. dollar against other major currencies affect our net operating revenues, operating income and the value of balance sheet items denominated in foreign currencies. In addition, unexpected and dramatic devaluations of currencies in developing, as well as developed, markets could negatively affect our revenues from, and the value of the assets located in, those markets.Transactional foreign currency gains (losses) are included in the Consolidated Statements of Income under the line item “Other income (expense) net.Transactional foreign currency gains (losses) included in the Consolidated Statements of Income under the line item “Other income (expense) net” for Fiscal 2021, Fiscal 2020 and Fiscal 2019 were ($1. ” See Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data. While we use derivative financial instruments to attempt to reduce our net exposure to currency exchange rate fluctuations, fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates, particularly the strengthening of the U.S. dollar against major currencies or the currencies of large developing countries, could materially affect our financial results. These risks and their potential impacts may be exacerbated by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the Russia-Ukraine conflict and any policy changes, including those resulting from trade and tariff disputes. These risks and their potential impacts may be exacerbated by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, Brexit, as defined below, and any policy changes, including those resulting from trade and tariff disputes. See “The COVID-19 pandemic has and may continue to further negatively affect our business, operations and financial performance” and “Geopolitical instability, political unrest, war and other global conflicts, including the Russia-Ukraine conflict, has affected and may continue to affect our business.”Our indebtedness could limit our operations and opportunitiesOur debt service obligations could have an adverse effect on our earnings and cash flows for as long as the indebtedness is outstanding, which could reduce the availability of our cash flow to fund working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions and other general corporate purposes.As of June 30, 2022, our credit facilities consisted of a $1.0 billion term loan facility (Term Loan B) and a $750 million committed revolving credit facility (the Revolver). Borrowings under Term Loan B and the Revolver, if any, are or will be secured by a first charge over substantially all of our assets, which security interests may limit our financial flexibility. Borrowings under Term Loan B and the Revolver, if any, are or will be secured by a first charge over substantially all of our assets. Repayments made under Term Loan B are equal to 0.25% of the original principal amount in equal quarterly installments for the life of Term Loan B, with the remainder due at maturity. As of June 30, 2022, we had no outstanding balance under the Revolver. The terms of Term Loan B and the Revolver include customary restrictive covenants that impose operating and financial restrictions on us, including restrictions on our ability to take actions that could be in our best interests. These restrictive covenants include certain limitations on our ability to make investments, loans and acquisitions, incur additional debt, incur liens and encumbrances, consolidate, amalgamate or merge with any other person, dispose of assets, make certain restricted payments, including a limit on dividends on equity securities or payments to redeem, repurchase or retire equity securities or other indebtedness, engage in transactions with affiliates, materially alter the business we conduct, and enter into 33certain restrictive agreements. Term Loan B and the Revolver includes a financial covenant relating to a maximum consolidated net leverage ratio, which could restrict our operations, particularly our ability to respond to changes in our business or to take specified actions. Our failure to comply with any of the covenants that are included in Term Loan B and the Revolver could result in a default under the terms thereof, which could permit the lenders thereunder to declare all or part of any outstanding borrowings to be immediately due and payable.As of June 30, 2022, we also have $900 million in aggregate principal amount of 3.875% Senior Notes due 2028 (Senior Notes 2028), $850 million in aggregate principal amount of 3.875% Senior Notes due 2028 (Senior Notes 2028) and $900 million in aggregate principal amount of 4. 875% Senior Notes due 2029 (Senior Notes 2029), $900 million in aggregate principal amount of 4.875% Senior Notes due 2028 (Senior Notes 2028) and $900 million in aggregate principal amount of 4. 125% Senior Notes due 2030 (Senior Notes 2030) and $650 million in aggregate principal amount of our 4.875% Senior Notes due 2028 (Senior Notes 2028) and $900 million in aggregate principal amount of 4. 125% senior unsecured notes due 2031 (Senior Notes 2031 and, together with the Senior Notes 2028, Senior Notes 2029 and Senior Notes 2030, the Senior Notes) outstanding, respectively issued in private placements to qualified institutional buyers pursuant to Rule 144A under the Securities Act and to certain persons in offshore transactions pursuant to Regulation S under the Securities Act.