Quiver Quantitative

Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - VTSI

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$VTSI Risk Factor changes from 00/03/23/20/2020 to 00/03/29/21/2021

Item 1A. Risk Factors, including “—Public health pandemics, epidemics or outbreaks, such as COVID-19, or coronavirus, could adversely impact our business.”) Competition and Competitive Landscape We compete against a number of established companies that provide similar products and services, some of which have financial, technical, marketing, sales, manufacturing, distribution and other resources significantly greater than ours. There are also companies whose products do not compete directly, but are sometimes closely related to the products we offer. Arotech, Inc., Cubic, Inc., Laser Shot, Inc., Meggitt Training Systems, and Ti Training Corp are our main competitors in some or all of our markets. We believe that our products and services are superior to those offered by our competitors based on our strength in developing higher quality software solutions, our patented accessories and our extensive library of virtual shooting scenario content that would require a substantial investment by a competitor to offer a comparable product. 5 Modern Round Co-Venture Agreement The Co-Venture Agreement with Modern Round grants TEC an exclusive non-transferrable license to use the Company’s technology and certain equipment solely for use at locations to operate the concept, as defined in the Co-Venture Agreement. 5 Modern Round Co-Venture Agreement with a Related Party The Co-Venture Agreement with Modern Round grants TEC an exclusive non-transferrable license to use the Company’s technology and certain equipment solely for use at locations to operate the concept, as defined in the Co-Venture Agreement. TEC agreed to pay the Company throughout the term of the Co-Venture Agreement, a royalty based on gross revenue, as defined and subject to certain minimum royalties commencing with the first twelve-month period subsequent to the respective milestone date of June 1, 2017. Throughout the duration of the Co-Venture Agreement, TEC will pay the Company a royalty based on gross revenue, as defined and subject to certain minimum royalties commencing with the first twelve-month period subsequent to the respective milestone date of June 1, 2017. Under the terms of the original agreement, if the total royalty payments for locations in the United States and Canada together do not total at least the minimum royalty amount specified in the agreement, TEC may pay to VirTra the difference between the amount of total royalty payments and the minimum specified in the agreement to maintain exclusivity. The Co-Venture Agreement also provided for (i) the grant of 1,365,789 membership units of Modern Round (“Units”) to the Company, (ii) a right to participate to the extent of five percent of any offering by Modern Round of its Units, and (iii) warrants to purchase 1,365,789 Units at a price of $0.25 per share. On December 31, 2015, Modern Round merged with a subsidiary of MREC pursuant to a Plan of Merger (the “Merger Agreement”) and each unit of Modern Round issued and outstanding as of the effective time of the merger automatically converted into the right to receive approximately 1.2277 shares of MREC common stock. As a result of the Merger Agreement, we held 1,676,748 shares of MREC, options to purchase 153,459 shares of MREC common stock at an exercise price of $0.41 per share, and conditional warrants to purchase 1,676,747 shares of MREC common stock at an exercise price of $0.20 per share. On October 25, 2016, we exercised the warrant and purchased 1,676,747 shares of MREC common stock for $335,349 resulting in our aggregate holdings of MREC increasing to 3,353,495. On August 16, 2017, the Company amended the Co-Venture Agreement to permit TEC to sublicense the VirTra Technology to third party operators of stand-alone location-based entertainment companies. On August 16, 2017, the Company entered into the first amendment to the Co-Venture Agreement to permit TEC to sublicense the VirTra Technology to third party operators of stand-alone location-based entertainment companies. TEC agreed to pay the Company royalties for any such sublicenses in an amount equal to 10% of the revenue paid to TEC in cases where TEC pays for the cost of the equipment for such location or 14% of the revenue paid to TEC in cases where it does not pay for the cost of the equipment. On July 23, 2018, the Company amended the Co-Venture Agreement to (i) confirm the minimum royalty deficiency benefit due for the royalty period ended May 31, 2018; (ii) establish payment terms for the minimum royalty deficiency benefit due, to include both cash and convertible promissory note payment; (iii) clarify the exclusivity provisions of the Agreement; and (iv) amend the minimum royalty calculations to only TEC branded facilities. On July 23, 2018, the Company entered into the second amendment to the Co-Venture Agreement to (i) confirm the minimum royalty deficiency benefit due for the royalty period ended May 31, 2018; (ii) establish payment terms for the minimum royalty deficiency benefit due, to include both cash and convertible promissory note payment; (iii) clarify the exclusivity provisions of the Agreement; and (iv) amend the minimum royalty calculations to only TEC branded facilities. On July 31, 2019, the Company executed the First Amendment to Convertible Promissory Note with TEC to extend the Convertible Note’s maturity date for one additional year to August 1, 2020 and TEC remitted a payment of 20% of its net proceeds from its recent public offering totaling $16,000. All other terms and conditions of the Convertible Note remained unchanged. For the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively, the Company recognized license fee income (royalties) from TEC of $45,247 and $130,625. As of December 31, 2019, the Company held 560,000 shares of TEC common stock, representing approximately 4. As a result, as of December 31, 2019, the Company holds 560,000 shares of TEC common stock, representing approximately 4. 8% of the issued and outstanding common shares of TEC. The Company determined a bona fide offer by TEC to sell investments for an amount less than the carrying amount of the Company’s investment occurred for the year ended December 31, 2019. The Company determined a bona fide offer by TEC to sell investments for an amount less than the carrying amount of the Company’s investment occurred for the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, as a result, an impairment loss of $280,000 and $254,933, respectively, was taken to write-down the TEC investment to the estimated fair value. As a result, an impairment loss of $280,000 was taken to write-down the TEC investment to the estimated fair value. During 2020, the Company determined the investment to be fully impaired and subsequently wrote down remaining $840,000. The impairment losses were recorded as an operating expense in 2020 and 2019. The Company recorded its investment at the estimated fair value as of December 31, 2020 and 2019 of $0 and $840,000, respectively. In addition, at December 31, 2020, the Company held a warrant to purchase 25,577 shares of TEC common stock at an exercise price of $2.4436 per share. This warrant became exercisable on April 14, 2016, the date of grant, and expires on the tenth anniversary of the date of grant, if not earlier pursuant to the terms of the option. Mitchell Saltz, who was a member of our Board of Directors until his passing in October 2020, was the former Chairman of the Board and majority stockholder of TEC. Accordingly, until October 2020, TEC was a related party. As of October 11, 2020, TEC is no longer considered a related party. Intellectual Property We own or have rights to trademarks or trade names that we use in connection with the operation of our business, including our corporate names, logos and website names. In addition, we own or have the rights to copyrights, trade secrets and other proprietary rights that protect the content of our products and the formulations for such products.

This Annual Report on Form 10-K may also contain trademarks, service marks and trade names of other companies, which are the property of their respective owners.

Our use or display of third parties’ trademarks, service marks, trade names or products in this Annual Report on Form 10-K is not intended to, and should not be read to, imply a relationship with or endorsement or sponsorship of us.

Solely for convenience, some of the copyrights, trade names and trademarks referred to in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are listed without their ©, ® and ™ symbols, but we will assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our rights to our copyrights, trade names and trademarks. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. We rely on certain proprietary technology and seek to protect our interests through a combination of patents, trademarks, copyrights, know-how, trade secrets and security measures, including confidentiality agreements. Our policy generally is to secure protection for significant innovations to the fullest extent practicable. Further, we seek to expand and improve the technological base and individual features of our products through ongoing research and development programs. Our patent portfolio includes seven issued U. Our patent portfolio includes three issued U. S. patents, which expire between 2025 and 2037. In 2019, VirTra completed an Asset Purchase Agreement with Tiberius Technology, LLC, that included purchase of a patent and two patent pendings, all patent ownership was transferred effective March 13, 2019 and the two patent pendings were issued as patents. In 2019, VirTra completed an Asset Purchase Agreement with Tiberius Technology, LLC, that included purchase of certain patents, the patent ownership was transferred effective March 13, 2019. 6 We own the trademarks for “VirTra,” “VirTra Systems”, “Threat-Fire” and many other branding trademarks. These trademarks are registered in the United States. We consider the protection of our trademarks to be important to our business. We also have copyright protection for our intellectual property produced for use in our products. We rely on the laws of unfair competition and trade secrets to protect our proprietary rights. We attempt to protect our trade secrets and other proprietary information through confidentiality and non-disclosure agreements with customers, suppliers, employees and consultants, and through other security measures. However, we may be unable to detect the unauthorized use of or take appropriate steps to enforce, our intellectual property rights. Effective trade secret protection may not be available in every country in which we offer or intend to offer our products and services to the same extent as in the United States. Failure to adequately protect our intellectual property could harm or even destroy our brands and impair our ability to compete effectively. Further, enforcing our intellectual property rights could result in the expenditure of significant financial and managerial resources and may not prove successful. Although we intend to protect our rights vigorously, there can be no assurance that these measures will be successful. Research and Development During the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, our research and product development expenses were approximately $1,603,379 and $1,345,513, respectively. Sources and Availability of Raw Materials/Manufacturing and Assembly We obtain the key components of our products from a variety of sources that we purchase on a purchase order basis from local suppliers at market prices based on our production requirements. We believe alternative sources generally exist for the components used in our products. Our manufacturing, assembly, warehouse and shipping facilities are located in Tempe, Arizona. See “—Business – Property.” Employees As of December 31, 2020, we employed 92 full-time employees.” Employees As of December 31, 2019, we employed 88 full-time employees. We believe that we maintain a satisfactory working relationship with our employees and we do not currently have any labor disputes. Property We lease approximately 37,729 rentable square feet of office and warehouse space from an unaffiliated third party for our corporate office, manufacturing, assembly, warehouse and shipping facility located at 7970 South Kyrene Road, Tempe, Arizona 85284. In addition, we lease approximately 5,131 rentable square feet of office and industrial space within the same business complex as our main office from an unaffiliated third party for our machine shop at 7910 South Kyrene Road, Tempe, Arizona 85226. Both properties are under the same lease agreement which expires in April 2024. Operations Our operations are conducted from our principal executive office in Tempe, Arizona. We have no offices or employees internationally. However, our U.S.-based sales force works to secure contracts to supply our products in U.S. and foreign markets. As of December 31, 2020, we have performed sales contracts and warranty service obligations in the U.S. and 33 foreign countries. When our products are introduced into an international market, it is either pursuant to a contract directly with a customer located in the foreign country, or pursuant to a contract between our company and a U.S. government agency (such as the U.S. Department of State). In the latter instance, our customer is the relevant U.S. government agency. The government agency may then distribute our products to third parties within the particular country. 7 Regulatory Matters Our business is regulated in most of our markets. We deal with numerous U.S. government agencies and entities, including, but not limited to, branches of the U.S. military and the Department of Homeland Security. Similar government authorities exist in our international markets. We are also subject to export laws and regulations. These laws include, among others, the U.S. Export Administration Regulations, administered by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security, the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (the “ITAR”), administered by the U.S. Department of State, Directorate of Defense Trade Controls, and trade sanctions, regulations and embargoes administered by the U.S. Department of Treasury, Office of Foreign Assets Control. Among its many provisions, the ITAR requires a license application for the export of firearms and congressional approval for any application with a total value of $1 million or higher. Any failures to comply with these laws and regulations could result in civil or criminal penalties, fines, investigations, adverse publicity and restrictions on our ability to export our products and repeat failures could carry more significant penalties. Any changes in export regulations may further restrict the export of our products. The length of time required by the licensing processes can vary, potentially delaying the shipment of products and the recognition of the corresponding revenue. Any restrictions on the export of our products could have a material adverse effect on our competitive position, results of operations, cash flows, or financial condition. For additional information related to export regulations, see Item 1A, “Risk Factors – Risks Related to Our Business.” Government Contracts The U.S. government, and other governments, may terminate any of our government contracts at their convenience, as well as for default, based on our failure to meet specified performance requirements. If any of our U.S. government contracts were to be terminated for convenience, we generally would be entitled to receive payment for work completed and allowable termination or cancellation costs. If any of our government contracts were to be terminated for default, generally the U.S. government would pay only for the work that has been accepted and can require us to pay the difference between the original contract price and the cost to re-procure the contract items, net of the work accepted from the original contract. The U.S. government can also hold us liable for damages resulting from the default. For additional information related to government contracts, see Item 1A. “Risk Factors – Risks Related to Our Business.” Environmental We are subject to various federal, state, local and non-U.S. laws and regulations relating to environmental protection, including the discharge, treatment, storage, disposal and remediation of hazardous substances and wastes. We continually assess our compliance status and management of environmental matters to ensure our operations are in substantial compliance with all applicable environmental laws and regulations. Investigation, remediation, operation and maintenance costs associated with environmental compliance and management of sites are a normal, recurring part of our operations. These costs often are allowable costs under our contracts with the U.S. government. It is reasonably possible that continued environmental compliance could have a material impact on our results of operations, financial condition or cash flows if additional work requirements or more stringent clean-up standards are imposed by regulators, new areas of soil and groundwater contamination are discovered and/or expansions of work scope are prompted by the results of investigations. ITEM 1A.

RISK FACTORS In addition to the other information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, we have identified the following risks and uncertainties that may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. You should carefully consider the risks described below before making an investment decision. 8 Risks Related to Our Business We depend on government contracts for substantially all of our revenues and the loss of government contracts or a delay or decline in funding of existing or future government contracts could decrease our backlog or adversely affect our sales and cash flows and our ability to fund our growth. Our revenues from contracts, directly or indirectly, with foreign and U.S. state, regional and local governmental agencies represented substantially all of our total revenues in fiscal year 2020. Although these various government agencies are subject to common budgetary pressures and other factors, many of our various government customers exercise independent purchasing decisions. As a result of the concentration of business with governmental agencies, we are vulnerable to adverse changes in our revenues, income and cash flows if a significant number of our government contracts, subcontracts or prospects are delayed or canceled for budgetary or other reasons. The factors that could cause us to lose these contracts and could decrease our backlog or otherwise materially harm our business, prospects, financial condition or results of operations include: 9 Government spending priorities and terms may change in a manner adverse to our businesses. A significant percentage of our revenue comes from domestic and foreign police forces. If these government entities have to cut their budgets, it is possible that we will lose this source of revenue, which could materially adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition or results of operations. We are working at diversifying our business so that we are not as dependent, but there is no assurance that we will be successful at doing so. Public health pandemics, epidemics or outbreaks, such as COVID-19, or coronavirus, could adversely impact our business. In December 2019, a novel strain of coronavirus (COVID-19) emerged in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. While initially the outbreak was largely concentrated in China and caused significant disruptions to its economy, it has now spread to several other countries, including the United States, and infections have been reported globally. The spread of COVID-19 has affected segments of the global economy and may affect our operations, including the potential interruption of our supply chain. The spread of COVID-19, or another infectious disease, could also negatively affect the operations at our third-party manufacturers, which could result in delays or disruptions in the supply of our products. The spread of COVID-19, or another infectious disease, could also negatively affect the operations at our third-party manufacturers, which could result in delays or disruptions in the supply of our products. In addition, we may take temporary precautionary measures intended to help minimize the risk of the virus to our employees, including temporarily requiring all employees to work remotely, suspending all non-essential travel worldwide for our employees, and discouraging employee attendance at industry events and in-person work-related meetings, which could negatively affect our business. The extent to which the coronavirus impacts our operations will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with confidence, including the duration of the outbreak, new information which may emerge concerning the severity of the coronavirus, the actions to contain the coronavirus or treat its impact, and changes in government spending or priorities, among others. The extent to which the coronavirus impacts our operations will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with confidence, including the duration of the outbreak, new information which may emerge concerning the severity of the coronavirus, the actions to contain the coronavirus or treat its impact, and changes in government spending or priorities, among others. In particular, the continued spread of the coronavirus globally could adversely impact our operations, including among others, our manufacturing and supply chain, sales and marketing and could have an adverse impact on our business and our financial results. The COVID-19 outbreak is a widespread health crisis that could adversely affect the economies and financial markets of many countries, resulting in an economic downturn that could affect demand for our products and likely impact our operating results. Intense competition could negatively impact our sales and operating results. Intense competition could negatively impact our sales and operating results. Our products are sold in highly competitive markets with limited barriers to entry. We compete against a number of established companies that provide similar products and services, some of which have financial, technical, marketing, sales, manufacturing, distribution and other resources significantly greater than ours. There are also companies whose products do not compete directly, but are sometimes closely related to the products we offer. Arotech, Inc., Cubic Inc., Laser Shot, Inc., Meggitt Training Systems, and Ti Training Corp. are our main competitors in some or all of our markets. We believe that our products and services are superior to those offered by our competitors based on our strength in developing higher quality software solutions, our patented accessories and our extensive library of training scenario content that would require a substantial investment of money and time by a competitor to offer a comparable product. The introduction by competitors of lower-priced or more innovative products could, however, result in a significant decline in our revenues and have a material adverse effect on our operating results, financial position and cash flows. If we are unable to anticipate customer preferences or to effectively identify, market and sell future products, our future revenues and operating results could be adversely affected. Our future success depends on our ability to effectively identify, market and sell new products that respond to new and evolving customer preferences. Accordingly, our revenues and operating results may be adversely affected if we are unable to identify or acquire rights to new products that satisfy customer preferences. In addition, any new products that we market may not generate sufficient revenues to recoup their identification, development, acquisition, marketing, selling and other costs. Decline in state and local government spending would likely negatively affect our product revenues and earnings. Success of each of the products we plan to sell depends substantially on the amount of funds budgeted by state and local government agencies that make up our current and potential customers. Global credit and financial markets have experienced extreme disruptions in the recent past, including severely diminished liquidity and credit availability, declines in consumer confidence, declines in economic growth, increases in unemployment rates and uncertainty about economic stability. There can be no assurance that similar disruptions will not occur in the future. Deterioration in general economic conditions may result in lower tax revenues that could lead to reductions in government spending, especially spending for discretionary simulation training products such as ours. Poor economic conditions could in turn lead to substantial decreases in our net sales or have a material adverse effect on our operating results, financial position and cash flows. We may not be able to receive or retain the necessary licenses or authorizations required for us to export or re-export our products, technical data or services, or to transfer technology from foreign sources and to work collaboratively with them. Denials of such licenses and authorizations could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. U.S. regulations concerning export controls require us to screen potential customers, destinations, and technology to ensure that sensitive equipment, technology and services are not exported in violation of U.S. policy or diverted to improper uses or users. In order for us to export certain products, technical data or services, we are required to obtain licenses from the U.S. government, often on a transaction-by-transaction basis. These licenses are generally required for the export of the military versions of our products and technical data and for defense services. We cannot be sure of our ability to obtain the U.S. government licenses or other approvals required to export our products, technical data and services for sales to foreign governments, foreign commercial customers or foreign destinations. 10 In addition, in order for us to obtain certain technical know-how from foreign vendors and to collaborate on improvements on such technology with foreign vendors, we may need to obtain U.S. government approval for such collaboration through manufacturing license or technical assistance agreements approved by U.S. government export control agencies. The U.S. government has the right, without notice, to revoke or suspend export licenses and authorizations for reasons of foreign policy, issues over which we have no control. Failure to receive required licenses or authorizations would hinder our ability to export our products, data and services and to use some advanced technology from foreign sources. This could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. Our failure to comply with export control rules could have a material adverse effect on our business. Our failure to comply with the export control rules described above could expose us to significant criminal or civil enforcement action by the U.S. government, and a conviction could result in denial of export privileges, as well as contractual suspension or debarment under U.S. government contracts, either of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. Failure to comply with the United States Foreign Corrupt Practices Act could subject us to penalties and other adverse consequences. We are subject to the United States Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which generally prohibits United States companies from engaging in bribery or other prohibited payments to foreign officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. Corruption, extortion, bribery, pay-offs, theft and other fraudulent practices occur from time-to-time in the foreign countries where we sell our products and services. We can make no assurance, however, that our employees or other agents will not engage in such conduct for which we might be held responsible. If our employees or other agents are found to have engaged in such practices, we could suffer severe penalties and other consequences that may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. We may face competition from providers of comparable products. Increased competition in those product categories could negatively affect our future revenues and operating results. Since we will not be the only seller and since we have a limited number of patents, the introduction of comparable products designed to compete with our products may increase in the future. With so much focus on homeland security and terrorism, it is possible that more companies will enter our business and sell new and/or innovative training tools. One area of particular concern is new virtual reality (VR) hardware and software. If other companies are able to create new training tools that are more realistic or effective, we may not be able to compete effectively. Introduction by competitors of comparable products, a maturing product lifecycle or other factors could result in a decline in our revenues derived from these products. A significant decline in our sales of these products, without offsetting sales gains, would have a material adverse effect on our operating results, financial position and cash flows. We operate in a highly competitive market and the size and resources of some of our competitors may allow them to compete more effectively than we can, resulting in a loss of our market share and a decrease in our revenues and gross profit. The markets for law enforcement, military, educational and commercial simulation training are highly competitive and include many new competitors as well as increased competition from established companies expanding their production and marketing of performance products. Despite owning patents, trademarks and copyrights, our current and future competitors could manufacture and sell products with performance characteristics and functionality similar to the products we sell and that we plan to sell. Some of our competitors are large companies with strong worldwide brand recognition, such as Cubic and Meggitt that have significantly greater financial, distribution, marketing and other resources than we do. Some of our competitors have significant competitive advantages, including longer operating histories, larger sales forces, bigger advertising budgets, better brand recognition, greater economies of scale and long-term relationships with key military customers that are potentially highly valuable because of the significant volume that our competitors sell to them. As a result, these competitors may be better equipped than we are to influence customer preferences or otherwise increase their market share by: ● quickly adapting to changes in customer requirements; 11 Disruptions could negatively impact revenue and results of operation. Our ability to manufacture and/or sell our products may be impaired by damage or disruption to our manufacturing, warehousing or distribution capabilities, or to the capabilities of our suppliers, contract manufacturers, logistics service providers or independent distributors. This damage or disruption could result from execution issues, as well as factors that are hard to predict or are beyond our control, such as product or raw material scarcity, adverse weather conditions, natural disasters, fire, terrorism, pandemics, strikes, cybersecurity breaches, government shutdowns, disruptions in logistics, supplier capacity constraints or other events. Failure to take adequate steps to mitigate the likelihood or potential impact of such events, or to effectively manage such events if they occur, may adversely affect our business or financial results, particularly in circumstances when a product is sourced from a single supplier or location. Disputes with significant suppliers, contract manufacturers, logistics service providers or independent distributors, including disputes regarding pricing or performance, may also adversely affect our ability to manufacture and/or sell our products, as well as our business or financial results. We are actively monitoring the recent coronavirus outbreak and its potential impact on our supply chain and operations. Although our products are manufactured in North America and we source the significant majority of our ingredients and raw materials from North America, due to current and potential future port closures and other restrictions resulting from the outbreak, global supply may become constrained, which may cause the price of certain ingredients and raw materials used in our products to increase and/or we may experience disruptions to our operations. While we do not expect that the virus will have a material adverse effect on our business or financial results at this time, we are unable to accurately predict the impact that the coronavirus will have due to various uncertainties, including the ultimate geographic spread of the virus, the severity of the disease, the duration of the outbreak, and actions that may be taken by governmental authorities. Some of the components of our products pose potential safety risks which could create potential liability exposure for us. Some of the components of our products contain elements that may pose potential safety risks. In addition to these risks, there can be no assurance that accidents in the facilities that use our products will not occur. Any accident, whether occasioned by the use of all or any part of our products or technology or by our customers’ operations, could adversely affect commercial acceptance of our products and could result in claims for damages resulting from injuries or death. Any of these occurrences would materially adversely affect our operations and financial condition. In the event that our products fail to perform as specified, users of these products may assert claims for substantial amounts. These claims could have a materially adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. There is no assurance that the amount of the general product liability insurance that we maintain will be sufficient to cover potential claims or that the present amount of insurance can be maintained at the present level of cost, or at all. Assertions by third parties of infringement or other violation by us of their intellectual property rights could result in significant costs and substantially harm our business and operating results. Companies engaged in the sales of products are frequently subject to litigation based on allegations of infringement, misappropriation or other violations of intellectual property rights. Some companies, including some of our competitors, own large numbers of patents, copyrights, trademarks and trade secrets, which they may use to assert claims against us. Third parties may in the future assert that we have infringed, misappropriated or otherwise violated their intellectual property rights. Existing laws and regulations are evolving and subject to different interpretations, and various federal and state legislative or regulatory bodies may expand current or enact new laws or regulations. We cannot guarantee you that we are not infringing or violating any third-party intellectual property rights. We cannot predict whether assertions of third-party intellectual property rights or any infringement or misappropriation claims arising from such assertions will substantially harm our business and operating results. If we are forced to defend against any infringement or misappropriation claims, we may be required to expend significant time and financial resources on the defense of such claims, even if without merit, settled out of court, or determined in our favor. Furthermore, an adverse outcome of a dispute may require us to: pay damages, potentially including treble damages and attorneys’ fees, if we are found to have willfully infringed a party’s intellectual property; cease making, licensing or using products or services that are alleged to infringe or misappropriate the intellectual property of others; expend additional development resources to redesign our products; enter into potentially unfavorable royalty or license agreements in order to obtain the right to use necessary technologies or materials; or to indemnify our partners and other third parties. Royalty or licensing agreements, if required or desirable, may be unavailable on terms acceptable to us, or at all, and may require significant royalty payments and other expenditures. In addition, we do not carry broadly applicable patent liability insurance and any lawsuits regarding patent rights, regardless of their success, could be expensive to resolve and would divert the time and attention of our management and technical personnel. Our business is dependent on proprietary rights that may be difficult to protect and could affect our ability to compete effectively. Our ability to compete effectively will depend on our ability to maintain the proprietary nature of our technology and content through a combination of patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret protection, non-disclosure agreements and licensing arrangements. 12 Litigation, or participation in administrative proceedings, may be necessary to protect our proprietary rights. This type of litigation can be costly and time consuming and could divert company resources and management attention to defend our rights, and this could harm us even if we were to be successful in the litigation and there is no guarantee we would be successful in such litigation. In the absence of patent protection, and despite our reliance upon our proprietary confidential information, our competitors may be able to use innovations similar to those used by us to design and manufacture products directly competitive with our products. In addition, no assurance can be given that others will not obtain patents that we will need to license or design around. To the extent any of our products are covered by third-party patents, we could need to acquire a license under such patents to develop and market our products. Despite our efforts to safeguard and maintain our proprietary rights, we may not be successful in doing so. In addition, competition is intense, and there can be no assurance that our competitors will not independently develop or patent technologies that are substantially equivalent or superior to our technology. In the event of patent litigation, we cannot assure you that a court would determine that we were the first creator of inventions covered by our issued patents or pending patent applications or that we were the first to file patent applications for those inventions. If existing or future third-party patents containing broad claims were upheld by the courts or if we were found to infringe third-party patents, we may not be able to obtain the required licenses from the holders of such patents on acceptable terms, if at all. Failure to obtain these licenses could cause delays in the introduction of our products or necessitate costly attempts to design around such patents, or could foreclose the development, manufacture or sale of our products. We could also incur substantial costs in defending ourselves in patent infringement suits brought by others and in prosecuting patent infringement suits against infringers. We also rely on trade secrets and proprietary know-how that we seek to protect, in part, through non-disclosure and confidentiality agreements with our customers, employees, consultants, and entities with which we maintain strategic relationships. We cannot assure you that these agreements will not be breached, that we would have adequate remedies for any breach or that our trade secrets will not otherwise become known or be independently developed by competitors. We depend on our executive officers, the loss of whom could materially harm our business. We rely upon the accumulated knowledge, skills and experience of our executive officers and significant employees. Our Chief Executive Officer, President and Chairman of the Board, Robert Ferris, built our business from inception and, along with other members of the management team, are responsible for many of the products and clients that we have today. If they were to leave us or become incapacitated, we might suffer in our planning and execution of business strategy and operations, impacting our financial results. We also do not maintain any key man life insurance policies for any of our employees. If we are unable to implement and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in the future, investors may lose confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports and the market price of our Common Stock may decline. As a public company, we are required to maintain internal control over financial reporting and to report any material weaknesses in such internal control. Further, we are required to report any changes in internal controls on a quarterly basis. In addition, we are required to furnish a report by management on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”). We will design, implement, and test the internal controls over financial reporting required to comply with these obligations. If we identify material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, if we are unable to comply with the requirements of Section 404 in a timely manner or assert that our internal control over financial reporting is ineffective, investors may lose confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports and the market price of the Common Stock could be negatively affected. We also could become subject to investigations by the stock exchange on which the securities are listed, the SEC, or other regulatory authorities, which could require additional financial and management resources. 13 As an “emerging growth company” under the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the “JOBS Act”), we are permitted to rely on exemptions from certain disclosure requirements. We qualify as an “emerging growth company” under the JOBS Act. As a result, we are permitted to, and intend to, rely on exemptions from certain disclosure requirements. For so long as we are an emerging growth company, we will not be required to: In addition, Section 102 of the JOBS Act also provides that an emerging growth company can take advantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act for complying with new or revised accounting standards. We have elected to take advantage of the benefits of this extended transition period. Our financial statements may therefore not be comparable to those of companies that comply with such new or revised accounting standards. We will remain an “emerging growth company” for up to five years, or until the earliest of (i) the last day of the first fiscal year in which our total annual gross revenues exceed $1 billion, (ii) the date that we become a “large accelerated filer” as defined in Rule 12b-2 under the Exchange Act, which would occur if the market value of our ordinary shares that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the last business day of our most recently completed second fiscal quarter or (iii) the date on which we have issued more than $1 billion in non-convertible debt during the preceding three year period. Until such time, however, we cannot predict if investors will find our Common Stock less attractive because we may rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our Common Stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our Common Stock and the price of our securities may be more volatile. As an emerging growth company, our auditor is not required to attest to the effectiveness of our internal controls. Our independent registered public accounting firm is not required to attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting while we are an emerging growth company or a smaller reporting company as defined under rules promulgated by the SEC. This means that the effectiveness of our financial reporting may differ from our peer companies in that they may be required to obtain independent registered public accounting firm attestations as to the effectiveness of their internal controls over financial reporting and we are not. While our management is required to attest to internal control over financial reporting and we will be required to detail changes to our internal controls on a quarterly basis, we cannot provide assurance that the independent registered public accounting firm’s review process in assessing the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting, if obtained, would not find one or more material weaknesses or significant deficiencies. Further, once we cease to be an emerging growth company and no longer qualify as a smaller reporting company, we will be subject to independent registered public accounting firm attestation regarding the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting. Even if management finds such controls to be effective, our independent registered public accounting firm may decline to attest to the effectiveness of such internal controls and issue a qualified report. 14 We do incur significant increased costs as a result of operating as a public company, and our management is required to devote substantial time to new compliance initiatives. As a public company with an obligation to file reports with the SEC under the Exchange Act, we do incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses that we would not incur as a private company. In addition, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act imposes various requirements on public companies including requiring establishment and maintenance of effective disclosure and financial controls. Our management and other personnel devote a substantial amount of time to these compliance initiatives. Moreover, these rules and regulations have increased and could continue to increase our legal and financial compliance costs and could make some activities more time-consuming and costly. For example, we expect that these rules and regulations may make it more difficult and more expensive for us to obtain directors’ and officers’ liability insurance, which could make it more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified members of our Board of Directors. We cannot predict or estimate the amount of additional costs we will incur to meet our additional disclosure obligations under the Exchange Act or the timing of such costs. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires, among other things, that we maintain effective internal control over financial reporting and disclosure controls and procedures. In particular, we must perform system and process evaluation and testing of our internal control over financial reporting to allow management to report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, as required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.

In addition, we are required to have our independent registered public accounting firm attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting the later of (i) our second annual report on Form 10-K, or (ii) the first annual report on Form 10-K following the date on which we are no longer an emerging growth company and no longer qualify as a smaller reporting company. In addition, we are required to have our independent registered public accounting firm attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting the later of, our second annual report on Form 10-K or, the first annual report on Form 10-K following the date on which we are no longer an emerging growth company and no longer qualify as a smaller reporting company. Our compliance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act could require that we incur substantial accounting expense and expend significant management efforts including the potential of hiring additional accounting and financial staff with appropriate public company experience and technical accounting knowledge. If we are not able to comply with the requirements of Section 404 in a timely manner, or if we or our independent registered public accounting firm identify deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting that are deemed to be material weaknesses, the market price of our stock could decline and we could be subject to sanctions or investigations by the SEC or other regulatory authorities, which would require additional financial and management resources. Our ability to successfully implement our business plan and comply with Section 404 requires us to be able to prepare timely and accurate financial statements. We expect that we will need to continue to improve existing, and implement new operational and financial systems, procedures and controls to manage our business effectively. Any delay in the implementation of, or disruption in the transition to, new or enhanced systems, procedures or controls, may cause our operations to suffer and we may be unable to conclude that our internal control over financial reporting is effective and to obtain an unqualified report on internal controls from our auditors as required under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. This, in turn, could have an adverse impact on trading prices for our Common Stock, and could adversely affect our ability to access the capital markets. Risks Relating to Our Stock NASDAQ may delist our Common Stock from trading on its exchange, which could limit stockholders’ ability to trade our Common Stock. Our Common Stock is listed for trading on NASDAQ requires us to meet certain financial, public float, bid price and liquidity standards on an ongoing basis in order to continue the listing of our Common Stock. If we fail to meet these continued listing requirements, our Common Stock may be subject to delisting. If our Common Stock is delisted and we are not able to list our Common Stock on another national securities exchange, we expect our securities would be quoted on an over-the-counter market. If this were to occur, our stockholders could face significant material adverse consequences, including limited availability of market quotations for our Common Stock and reduced liquidity for the trading of our securities. In addition, we could experience a decreased ability to issue additional securities and obtain additional financing in the future. 15 Our Common Stock price is likely to be highly volatile because of several factors, including a limited public float. The market price of our Common Stock has been volatile in the past and the market price of our Common Stock could be volatile in the future. You may not be able to resell shares of our Common Stock following periods of volatility because of the market’s adverse reaction to volatility. Other factors that could cause such volatility may include, among other things: Any of these factors could have a significant and adverse impact on the market price of our Common Stock. In addition, the stock market in general has at times experienced extreme volatility and rapid decline that has often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of particular companies. These broad market fluctuations may adversely affect the trading price of our Common Stock, regardless of our actual operating performance. Because our officers and Board of Directors will make all management decisions, you should only invest in our securities if you are comfortable entrusting our directors to make all decisions. Our Board of Directors will have the sole right to make all decisions with respect to our management. Investors will not have an opportunity to evaluate the specific projects that will be financed with future operating income. You should not purchase our securities unless you are willing to entrust all aspects of our management to our officers and directors. We may need to raise additional capital. If we are unable to raise necessary additional capital, our business may fail or our operating results and our stock price may be materially adversely affected. As an emerging growth company, we may need to secure adequate funding for opportunities we may encounter. Such opportunities may include acquiring complementary businesses, securing new marketing and sales opportunities, giving bonuses to employees to reward them for past service and incentivize them for future successes. Selling additional stock, either privately or publicly, would dilute the equity interests of our stockholders. If we borrow more money, we will have to pay interest and may also have to agree to restrictions that limit our operating flexibility. If we are unable to obtain adequate financing, if needed, we may have to curtail our operations and our business could fail. 16 Our issuance of additional Common Stock in exchange for services or to repay debt would dilute your proportionate ownership and voting rights and could have a negative impact on the market price of our Common Stock. We may generally issue shares of Common Stock and Common Stock issuable upon exercise of stock options and warrants to pay for debt or services, without further approval by our stockholders based upon such factors as our Board of Directors may deem relevant at that time. It is possible that we will issue additional shares of Common Stock under circumstances we may deem appropriate at the time. Shares eligible for future sale may adversely affect the market. From time to time, certain of our stockholders may be eligible to sell all or some of their shares of Common Stock by means of ordinary brokerage transactions in the open market pursuant to Rule 144 promulgated under the Securities Act, subject to certain limitations. In general, pursuant to Rule 144, non-affiliate stockholders may sell freely after six months, subject only to the current public information requirement. Affiliates may sell after six months, subject to the Rule 144 volume, manner of sale (for equity securities), current public information, and notice requirements. Of the approximately 7,775,030 shares of our Common Stock outstanding as of March 23, 2021, 7,500 shares are restricted subject to Rule 144 with the remaining shares tradable without restriction. Of the approximately 7,745,030 shares of our Common Stock outstanding as of March 23, 2020, 7,500 shares are restricted subject to Rule 144 with the remaining shares tradable without restriction. Given the limited trading of our Common Stock, resale of even a small number of shares of our Common Stock pursuant to Rule 144 or an effective registration statement may adversely affect the market price of our Common Stock. Our equity incentive plan allows us to issue stock options and award shares of our Common Stock. We may in the future create additional equity incentive plans, which may at that time require us to file a registration statement under the Securities Act to cover the issuance of shares upon the exercise or vesting of awards granted or otherwise purchased under those plans. As a result, any shares issued or granted under the plans may be freely tradable in the public market. If equity securities are issued under the plans, if implemented, and it is perceived that they will be sold in the public market, then the price of our Common Stock could decline substantially. No holders of any shares of our Common Stock have rights to require us to file registration statements for the public resale of such shares. Provisions of our Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws may delay or prevent a takeover which may not be in the best interests of our stockholders. Provisions of our Articles of Incorporation and our Bylaws may be deemed to have anti-takeover effects, which include when and by whom special meetings of our stockholders may be called, and may delay, defer or prevent a takeover attempt. In addition, certain provisions of the Nevada Revised Statutes also may be deemed to have certain anti-takeover effects which include that control of shares acquired in excess of certain specified thresholds will not possess any voting rights unless these voting rights are approved by a majority of a corporation’s disinterested stockholders. Further, our Articles of Incorporation authorize the issuance of up to 2,500,000 shares of preferred stock with such rights and preferences as may be determined from time to time by our Board of Directors in their sole discretion. Our Board of Directors may, without stockholder approval, issue additional series of preferred stock with dividends, liquidation, conversion, voting or other rights that could adversely affect the voting power or other rights of the holders of our Common Stock. We have never paid dividends on our Common Stock and have no plans to do so in the future. Holders of shares of our Common Stock are entitled to receive such dividends as may be declared by our Board of Directors. To date, we have paid no cash dividends on our shares of Common Stock and we do not expect to pay cash dividends on our Common Stock in the foreseeable future. We intend to retain future earnings, if any, to provide funds for operations of our business. Therefore, any return investors in our Common Stock may have will be in the form of appreciation, if any, in the market value of their shares of Common Stock. ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS Not applicable. 17 .
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