Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - VSAT

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ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

You should consider each of the following factors as well as the other information in this Annual Report in evaluating our business and prospects. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones we face. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently consider immaterial may also impair our business operations. If any of the following risks actually occur, our business and financial results could be harmed. In that case, the trading price of our common stock could decline. You should also refer to the other information set forth in this Annual Report, including our financial statements and the related notes.

Risks Related to Our Satellites and Business

Our Operating Results Are Difficult to Predict

Our operating results have varied significantly from quarter to quarter in the past and may continue to do so in the future. Factors that cause our quarter-to-quarter operating results to be unpredictable include the status of satellite-related activities (including the construction, launch and bringing into service of satellites and the associated levels of investment); impact of any construction or launch delays, operational or launch failures, satellite anomalies or deployment issues or other disruptions to our satellites; timing, quantity and mix of products and services sold; unpredictability or length of procurement processes; timing of customer payments; cost overruns (due to inflation or otherwise); impact of one-time charges; and other factors described under the heading “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations — Factors and Trends Affecting our Results of Operations” in Part II, Item 7 of this report. Factors that cause our quarter-to-quarter operating results to be unpredictable include the status of satellite-related activities (including the construction, launch and bringing into service of satellites and the associated levels of investment); impact of any construction or launch delays, operational or launch failures or other disruptions to our satellites; timing, quantity and mix of products and services sold; unpredictability or length of procurement processes; timing of customer payments; cost overruns (due to inflation or otherwise); impact of one-time charges; and other factors described under the heading “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations – Factors and Trends Affecting our Results of Operations” in Part II, Item 7 of this report. Any of the foregoing factors, or any other factors discussed elsewhere herein, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations that could adversely affect our stock price.

Satellite Failures or Degradations in Satellite Performance Could Affect Our Business, Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Satellites utilize highly complex technology, operate in the harsh environment of space and are subject to significant operational risks while in orbit. These risks include malfunctions (commonly referred to as anomalies), such as malfunctions in the deployment of subsystems and/or components, interference from electrostatic storms, and collisions with meteoroids, decommissioned spacecraft or other space debris. Anomalies can occur as a result of various factors, including satellite manufacturer error, problems with the power or control sub-system of a satellite or general failures caused by the harsh space environment. Our satellites have experienced various anomalies in the past and we will likely experience anomalies in the future. In addition, satellites may experience issues in deployment or anomalies during orbit raising. For example, our first ViaSat-3 satellite experienced a reflector deployment issue and our I6 F2 satellite experience a power subsystem anomaly during its orbit raising phase. Any single anomaly or other operational failure or degradation on the satellites we use could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Anomalies may also reduce the expected useful life of a satellite, thereby creating additional expense due to the need to provide replacement or backup capacity, which may not be available on reasonable economic terms, a reasonable schedule or at all. In addition, anomalies or satellite failures or degradations may cause a reduction of the revenues generated by the applicable satellite or the recognition of an impairment loss (such as those we experienced in connection with the launch of our ViaSat-3 F1 and I6 F2 satellites), and could lead to claims from third parties for damages. Finally, anomalies may adversely affect our ability to insure our satellites at commercially reasonable premiums or terms, if at all. While some anomalies are covered by insurance policies, others may not be covered or may be subject to large deductibles. Although our satellites have redundant or backup systems and components that operate in the event of an anomaly, operational failure or degradation of primary critical components, these redundant or backup systems and components are subject to risk of failure similar to those experienced by the primary systems and components. The occurrence of a failure of any of these redundant or backup systems and components could materially impair the useful life, capacity, coverage or operational capabilities of the satellite.

Satellites Have a Finite Useful Life, and Their Actual Operational Life May Be Shorter than Their Mission Life

Our ability to earn revenues from our satellite services depends on the continued operation of the satellites we own and operate or use. Each satellite has a limited useful life, referred to as its mission life. There can be no assurance as to the actual operational life of a satellite, which may be shorter than its mission life. A number of factors affect the useful lives of the satellites, including the quality of design and construction, durability of component parts and back-up units, the ability to continue to maintain proper orbit and control over the satellite’s functions, the efficiency of the launch vehicle used, consumption of on-board fuel, degradation and durability of solar panels, the actual space environment experienced and the occurrence of anomalies or other in-orbit risks affecting the satellite. In addition, continued improvements in satellite technology may make satellites obsolete prior to the end of their operational life.

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New or Proposed Satellites Are Subject to Significant Risks Related to Construction and Launch that Could Limit Our Ability to Utilize these Satellites

Satellite construction and launch are subject to significant risks, including construction delays, manufacturer error, cost overruns, regulatory conditions or delays, unavailability of launch opportunities, launch failure, damage or destruction during launch and improper orbital placement, any of which could result in significant additional cost or materially impair the useful life, capacity, coverage or operational capabilities of the satellite. The technologies in our satellite designs are also very complex, and there can be no assurance that the technologies will work as we expect or that we will realize any or all of their anticipated benefits. We have in the past identified construction-related issues in our satellites. For example, our ViaSat-2 satellite experienced an antenna deployment issue which reduced its output capabilities. Satellite construction and launch activities may be delayed by a number of factors, many of which may be outside of our control. For example, civil unrest in French Guiana caused a delay in the launch of our ViaSat-2 satellite. Similarly, the COVID-19 pandemic with the resultant construction delays and supply chain disruptions, followed by launch delays caused by both adverse weather events and the scheduling of high priority launch missions, delayed the construction and launch of the ViaSat-3 F1 satellite. If satellite construction schedules are not met or other events prevent satellite launch on schedule, a launch opportunity may not be available at the time the satellite is ready to be launched. In addition, delays in construction or launch could impact our ability to meet milestone conditions in our satellite authorizations and/or to maintain the rights we may enjoy under various ITU filings. A launch failure may result in significant delays because of the need both to construct a replacement satellite and to obtain other launch opportunities. The overall historical launch failure rate for proven/established launch vehicles serving the commercial satellite industry for launches of commercial satellites (similar in size or mission to Viasat's fleet) to geostationary orbits in the last five years is estimated by some industry participants to be close to 0% but could at any time be higher. Launch vehicles may also underperform, in which case the satellite may still be able to be placed into service by using its onboard propulsion systems to reach the desired orbital location, but this would cause a reduction in its useful life. Moreover, even if launch is successful, there can be no assurance that the satellite will successfully reach its geostationary orbital slot and pass in-orbit testing prior to transfer of control of the satellite to us. We may also experience issues during orbital placement and testing, such as the reflector deployment issue experienced with the ViaSat-3 F1 satellite or the power subsystem anomaly suffered by the I-6 F2 satellite during its orbit raising phase. The failure to implement our satellite deployment plan on schedule could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Potential Satellite Losses May Not Be Fully Covered By Insurance, or at All

We may not be able to obtain or renew pre-launch, launch or in-orbit insurance for our satellites on reasonable economic terms or at all. A failure to obtain or renew our satellite insurance may also result in a default under our debt instruments. In addition, the occurrence of anomalies on other satellites, or failures of a satellite using similar components or failures of a similar launch vehicle to any launch vehicle we intend to use, may materially adversely affect our ability to insure our satellites at commercially reasonable premiums or terms, if at all.

The policies covering our insured satellites will not cover the full cost of constructing and launching or replacing a satellite nor fully cover our losses in the event of a satellite failure or significant degradation. Moreover, such policies do not cover lost profits, business interruptions, fixed operating expenses, loss of business or similar losses, including contractual payments that we may be required to make under our agreements with our customers for interruptions or degradations in service. Our insurance contains customary exclusions, material change and other conditions that could limit recovery under those policies, and may contain exclusions for past satellite anomalies. Further, any insurance proceeds may not be received on a timely basis in order to launch a replacement satellite or take other remedial measures. In addition, the policies are subject to limitations involving uninsured losses, large satellite performance deductibles and policy limits.

The Markets in Which We Compete Are Highly Competitive and Our Competitors May Have Greater Resources than Us

The markets in which we compete are highly competitive and competition is increasing. In addition, because the markets in which we operate are constantly evolving and characterized by rapid technological change, it is difficult for us to predict whether, when and by whom new competing technologies, products or services may be introduced into our markets. Currently, we face substantial competition in each of our segments. See “Business–Competition” in Part I, Item 1 of this report for a discussion of the competitive environment in each of our segments. Many of our competitors have significant competitive advantages, including strong customer relationships, more experience with regulatory compliance, greater financial and management resources and access to technologies not available to us. Many of our competitors are also substantially larger than we are and may have more extensive engineering, manufacturing and marketing capabilities than we do. As a result, these competitors may be able to adapt more quickly to changing technology or market conditions or may be able to devote greater resources to the development, promotion and sale of their products. Our ability to

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compete in each of our segments may also be adversely affected by limits on our capital resources and our ability to invest in maintaining and expanding our market share.

The Global Business Environment and Economic Conditions Could Negatively Affect Our Business, Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Our business and operating results are affected by the global business environment and economic conditions, including changes in interest rates, consumer credit conditions, consumer debt levels, consumer confidence, rates of inflation, unemployment rates, energy costs, geopolitical issues and other macro-economic factors. For example, high unemployment levels or energy costs may impact our customer base in our satellite services segment by reducing consumers’ discretionary income, reducing airline passenger numbers, and affecting their ability to subscribe for fixed broadband services. For example, high unemployment levels or energy costs may impact our customer base in our satellite services segment by reducing consumers’ discretionary income and affecting their ability to subscribe for our broadband services. Our commercial networks segment similarly depends on the economic health and willingness of our customers and potential customers to make and adhere to capital and financial commitments to purchase our products and services. During periods of slowing global economic growth or recession, our customers or key suppliers may experience deterioration of their businesses, cash flow shortages and difficulty obtaining financing or insolvency. Existing or potential customers may reduce or postpone spending in response to tighter credit, reduced consumer demand, negative financial news or declines in income or asset values, which could have a material negative effect on the demand for our products and services. For example, the business and financial condition of our commercial airline customers were materially impacted during the COVID-19 pandemic by the severe decline in global air travel. In addition, current supply chain and labor market challenges and inflationary pressures have negatively affected and may continue to negatively affect our performance as well as the performance of our suppliers and customers. Moreover, natural disasters (including those resulting from climate change), political instability, civil unrest, terrorist activity, acts of war, and public health issues such as the COVID-19 pandemic or epidemics could disrupt supplies and raise prices globally which, in turn, may have adverse effects on the world and U.S. economies. Any of these factors could result in reduced demand for, and pricing pressure on, our products and services, which could reduce our revenues and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, U.S. credit and capital markets have experienced significant dislocations and liquidity disruptions from time to time. Uncertainty or volatility in credit or capital markets may negatively impact our ability to access additional debt or equity financing or to refinance existing indebtedness in the future on favorable terms or at all. Any of these risks could impair our ability to fund our operations or limit our ability to expand our business, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Acquisitions such as the Inmarsat Acquisition, Joint Ventures and Other Strategic Alliances May Have an Adverse Effect on Our Business; We May Fail to Realize the Anticipated Benefits of such Transactions

In order to position ourselves to take advantage of growth opportunities, from time to time we make strategic acquisitions and enter into joint ventures and other strategic alliances that involve significant risks and uncertainties. For example, during fiscal year 2024 we completed the Inmarsat Acquisition and in fiscal year 2022 we closed the acquisitions of RigNet and EBI. Risks and uncertainties relating to the these transactions and any other acquisitions, joint ventures and other strategic alliances we may undertake include:

the difficulty in combining, integrating and managing newly acquired businesses or any businesses of a joint venture or strategic alliance in an efficient and effective manner;
the challenges in achieving the objectives, cost savings, synergies and other benefits expected from such transactions;
the risk of diverting resources and the attention of senior management from the operations of our business;
additional demands on management related to integration efforts or the increase in the size and scope of our company following an acquisition or to the complexities of a joint venture or strategic alliance, including challenges of coordinating geographically dispersed organizations and addressing differences in corporate cultures or management philosophies;
difficulties in the assimilation and retention of key employees and in maintaining relationships with present and potential customers, distributors and suppliers;
the lack of unilateral control over a joint venture or strategic alliance and the risk that joint venture or strategic partners have business goals and interests that are not aligned with ours, or the failure of a joint venture partner to satisfy its obligations or its bankruptcy or malfeasance;
costs and expenses associated with any undisclosed or potential liabilities of an acquired business;

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delays, difficulties or unexpected costs in the integration, assimilation, implementation or modification of platforms, systems, functions (including corporate, administrative, information technology, marketing and distribution functions), technologies, infrastructure, and product and service offerings of the acquired business, joint venture or strategic alliance, or in the harmonization of standards, controls (including internal accounting controls), procedures and policies;
the risk that funding requirements of the acquired business, joint venture or combined company may be significantly greater than anticipated;
the risks of entering markets in which we have less experience; and
the risks of disputes concerning indemnities and other obligations that could result in substantial costs.

We may not achieve the anticipated growth, cost savings or other benefits from the Inmarsat Acquisition or any other transaction we may undertake without adversely affecting current revenues and investments in future growth. Moreover, the anticipated growth, cost savings, synergies and other benefits of the Inmarsat Acquisition or any other transaction we may undertake may not be realized fully, or at all, or may take longer to realize than expected. Moreover, the anticipated growth, cost savings, synergies and other benefits of the Inmarsat Transaction or any other 30 transaction we may undertake may not be realized fully, or at all, or may take longer to realize than expected. Additionally, we may inherit legal, regulatory, and other risks of the acquired business, whether known or unknown to us, which may be material to the combined company. Moreover, uncertainty about the effect of a pending transaction on employees, suppliers and customers may have an adverse effect on us and/or the acquired business, which uncertainties may impair our or its ability to attract, retain and motivate key personnel, and could cause our or its customers, suppliers and distributors to seek to change existing business relationships with either of us. Moreover, uncertainty about the effect of a pending transaction such as the Inmarsat Transaction on employees, suppliers and customers may have an adverse effect on us and/or the acquired business, which uncertainties may impair our or its ability to attract, retain and motivate key personnel, and could cause our or its customers, suppliers and distributors to seek to change existing business relationships with either of us. In addition, in connection with acquisitions, joint ventures or strategic alliances, we may incur debt, issue equity securities, assume contingent liabilities or have amortization expenses and write-downs of acquired assets, which could cause our earnings per share to decline. In addition, for companies such as Inmarsat that are private companies at the time of acquisition, bringing their legacy systems and procedures into compliance with Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 requirements and integrating them into our compliance and accounting systems may cause us to incur substantial additional expense, make some activities more difficult, time-consuming or costly and increase demand on our systems and resources.

Mergers, acquisitions, joint ventures and strategic alliances are inherently risky and subject to many factors outside of our control, and we cannot be certain that our previous or future acquisitions, joint ventures and strategic alliances will be successful and will not materially adversely affect our business, operating results or financial condition. We may not be able to successfully integrate the businesses, products, technologies or personnel that we might acquire in the future, and any strategic investments we make may not meet our financial or other investment objectives. Any failure to do so could seriously harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our Reliance on U.S. Government Contracts Exposes Us to Significant Risks

Our government systems segment revenues typically represent a significant percentage of our total revenues, and are derived primarily from U.S. Government applications. Therefore, any significant disruption or deterioration of our relationship with the U.S. Government would significantly reduce our revenues. U.S. Government business exposes us to various risks, including:

changes in governmental procurement legislation and regulations and other policies, which may reflect military and political developments;
unexpected contract or project terminations or suspensions;
unpredictable order placements, reductions or cancellations;
reductions or delays in government funds available for our projects due to government policy changes, budget cuts or delays, changes in available funding, reductions in defense expenditures and contract adjustments;
the ability of competitors to protest contractual awards;
penalties arising from post-award contract audits;
the reduction in the value of our contracts as a result of the routine audit and investigation of our costs by U.S. Government agencies;
higher-than-expected final costs, particularly relating to software and hardware development, for work performed under contracts where we commit to specified deliveries for a fixed price;
limited profitability from cost-reimbursement contracts under which the profit is limited to a specified amount;

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unpredictable cash collections of unbilled receivables that may be subject to acceptance of deliverables by the customer and contract close-out procedures, including government approval of final indirect rates;
competition with programs managed by other government contractors for limited resources and for uncertain levels of funding;
significant changes in contract scheduling or program structure, which generally result in delays or reductions in deliveries; and
intense competition for available U.S. Government business necessitating increases in time and investment for design and development.

We must comply with and are affected by laws and regulations relating to the award, administration and performance of U.S. Government contracts. Government contract laws and regulations affect how we do business with our customers and, in some instances, impose added costs on our business, including the establishment of compliance procedures. A violation of specific laws and regulations could result in the imposition of fines and penalties, the termination of our contracts or debarment from bidding on contracts.

Substantially all of our U.S. Government backlog scheduled for delivery can be terminated at the convenience of the U.S. Government because our contracts with the U.S. Government typically provide that orders may be terminated with limited or no penalties. If we are unable to address any of the risks described above, or if we were to lose all or a substantial portion of our sales to the U.S. Government, it could materially harm our business and impair the value of our common stock.

The funding of U.S. Government programs is subject to congressional appropriations. Congress generally appropriates funds on a fiscal year basis even though a program may extend over several fiscal years. Consequently, programs are often only partially funded initially and additional funds are committed only as Congress makes further appropriations. In the event that appropriations for one of our programs become unavailable, or are reduced or delayed, our contract or subcontract under such program may be terminated or adjusted by the government, which could have a negative impact on our future sales and results of operations. Budget cuts to defense spending, such as those that took effect in March 2013 under the Budget Control Act of 2011, can exacerbate these problems. From time to time, when a formal appropriation bill has not been signed into law before the end of the U.S. Government’s fiscal year, Congress may pass a continuing resolution that authorizes agencies of the U.S. Government to continue to operate, generally at the same funding levels from the prior year, but does not authorize new spending initiatives, during a certain period. During such period (or until the regular appropriation bills are passed), delays can occur in procurement of products and services due to lack of funding, and such delays can affect our results of operations during the period of delay.

Our Success Depends on the Investment in and Development of New Broadband Technologies and Advanced Communications and Secure Networking Systems, Products and Services, as well as their Market Acceptance

Broadband, advanced communications and secure networking markets are subject to rapid technological change, frequent new and enhanced product and service introductions, product obsolescence and changes in user requirements. Our ability to compete successfully in these markets depends on our success in applying our expertise and technology to existing and emerging broadband, advanced communications and secure networking markets, as well as our ability to successfully develop, introduce and sell new products and services on a timely and cost-effective basis that respond to ever-changing customer requirements, which depends on numerous factors, including our ability to: continue to develop market-leading satellite technologies (including high-capacity Ka-band satellites and associated ground networks); continue to increase satellite capacity, bandwidth cost-efficiencies and service quality; develop and introduce competitive products, services and technologies with innovative features that differentiate our offerings from those of our competitors; successfully integrate our complex technologies and system architectures; and implement manufacturing and assembly processes and cost reduction efforts.

We cannot assure you that our new technology, product or service offerings will be successful or that any of our offerings will achieve market acceptance. Many of these risks are amplified in new and emerging markets where we do not currently operate or have limited operations, but which present opportunities for international expansion following the launch of commercial service on our ViaSat-3 global constellation. The time from conception through satellite launch for a new satellite design may be four years or longer, thereby delaying our ability to realize the benefits of our investments in new satellite designs and technologies. We may experience difficulties that could delay or prevent us from successfully selecting, developing, manufacturing or marketing new technologies, products or services, which could increase costs and divert our attention and resources from other projects. We cannot be sure that our efforts and expenditures will ultimately lead to the timely development of new offerings and technologies. In addition, defects may be found in our products after we begin deliveries that could degrade service quality, or result in the delay or loss of market acceptance. If we are unable

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to design, manufacture, integrate and market profitable new products and services for existing or emerging markets, it could materially harm our business, financial condition and results of operations, and impair the value of our common stock.

In addition, we believe that significant investments in next-generation broadband satellites and associated infrastructure will continue to be required as demand for broadband services and satellite systems with higher capacity and higher speed continues to grow. The development of these capital-intensive next-generation systems may require us to undertake debt financing and/or the issuance of additional equity, which could expose us to increased risks and impair the value of our common stock. In addition, if we are unable to effectively or profitably design, manufacture, integrate and market such next-generation technologies, it could materially harm our business, financial condition and results of operations, and impair the value of our common stock.

Because Our Products Are Complex and Are Deployed in Complex Environments, Our Products as well as Third Party Products on Which We Rely Are Likely To Have Vulnerabilities and Defects that We May Discover Only After Full Deployment, which Could Seriously Harm Our Business

We produce highly complex products that incorporate leading-edge technology, including both hardware and software, including hardware and software manufactured by third parties. Software typically contains defects or programming flaws that can unexpectedly interfere with expected operations. In addition, our products are complex and are designed to be deployed across complex networks, which in some cases may include over a million users, and are sometimes integrated with our customers' systems. In addition, our products are complex and are designed to be deployed across complex networks, which in some cases may include over a million users. Because of the nature of these products, there is no assurance that our pre-shipment testing programs will be adequate to detect all defects or vulnerabilities. As a result, our customers may discover errors or defects in our hardware or software, or our products may not operate as expected after they have been fully deployed. As a result, our customers may discover errors or 32 defects in our hardware or software, or our products may not operate as expected after they have been fully deployed. If we are unable to cure a product defect, we could experience damage to our reputation, reduced customer satisfaction, loss of existing customers and failure to attract new customers, failure to achieve market acceptance, cancellation of orders, loss of revenues, reduction in backlog and market share, increased service and warranty costs, diversion of development resources, legal actions by our customers, product returns or recalls, issuance of credit to customers and increased insurance costs. Further, due to the high volume nature of our fixed broadband business, defects of products used in this business could significantly increase these risks. Defects, integration issues or other performance problems in our products could also result in financial or other damages to our customers. Our customers could seek damages for related losses from us, which could seriously harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. A product liability claim brought against us, even if unsuccessful, would likely be time consuming and costly. The occurrence of any of these problems would seriously harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, given the complex nature of our systems and technologies, we regularly identify and track security vulnerabilities using scanning tools. In addition, the policies are subject to limitations involving uninsured losses, large satellite performance deductibles and policy limits. We cannot guarantee comprehensively applied patches nor confirm that measures are in place to mitigate all such vulnerabilities or that patches will be applied before vulnerabilities are exploited by a threat actor. If a threat actor is able to exploit a critical vulnerability before patches are installed or mitigating measures are implemented, significant compromises could impact our and our customers’ systems and data, and could materially harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our Reputation and Business Could Be Materially Harmed as a Result of Data Breaches, Data Theft, Unauthorized Access or Hacking

We rely heavily on computer systems, hardware, software, infrastructure and various connected sites and networks for both internal and external operations that are critical to our business (collectively, IT Systems). We own and manage some of these IT Systems but also rely on third parties for a range of IT Systems and related products and services, including but not limited to cloud computing services. In addition, in the ordinary course of our business, our IT Systems and those of our third-party business partners, including our distributors, business partners, supply chain and other vendors, store sensitive data, including information that is confidential, regulated, proprietary or otherwise sensitive in nature to our business. This information may include intellectual property and product information, personal data, financial information and other confidential business information relating to us and our employees, customers, suppliers and other business partners.

We and our distributors, partners, vendors and customers face numerous and evolving cybersecurity risks that threaten the confidentiality, integrity and availability of our respective IT Systems and information, including threats from a wide range of bad actors and malicious parties, such as computer programmers, hackers or sophisticated nation-state and nation-state supported actors, as well as incidents attributable to employee error or wrongful conduct, malfeasance, the exploitation of misconfigurations, "bugs" and other vulnerabilities in hardware or software, or other disruptions caused by sophisticated social engineering and malware exploits (e.g., ransomware).

Despite our security measures, and those of our third-party vendors, we have experienced cyberattacks, data breaches and disruptive incidents, and we remain vulnerable to breaches, attacks and disruptions in the future. For

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example, in late fiscal year 2022, a cyberattack involving our KA-SAT network resulted in a partial interruption of consumer-oriented fixed broadband services provided through our KA-SAT satellite, affecting thousands of fixed broadband customers in Europe and North Africa. While to date no incidents have had a material impact on our operations or financial results, we cannot guarantee that material incidents will not occur in the future.

Because the techniques used to obtain unauthorized access, disable or degrade service, or sabotage IT Systems, change frequently and often are not recognized until launched against a target, we may be unable to anticipate these techniques (such as those incorporating artificial intelligence) or unable to implement adequate preventative measures, particularly given that attackers are increasingly using sophisticated techniques designed to circumvent controls, evade detection, and remove forensic evidence. Any integration of artificial intelligence in our or any third party’s operations, products or services is expected to pose new or unknown cybersecurity risks and challenges. We have also acquired and expect to continue to acquire companies that have cybersecurity vulnerabilities and/or unsophisticated security measures, and we face challenges in integrating acquired entities with our cybersecurity program, controls and tools, all of which exposes us to significant cybersecurity, operational, and financial risks with any merger, acquisition or joint venture in which we engage. Additionally, outside parties regularly attempt to induce employees or users to disclose sensitive or confidential information through phishing and other social engineering techniques in order to gain access to IT Systems and data. There can also be no assurance that our cybersecurity risk management program and processes, including our policies, controls or procedures, will be fully implemented, complied with or effective in protecting our IT Systems and confidential information.

If any breach or attack compromises our IT Systems, creates system disruptions or slowdowns or exploits security vulnerabilities therein, the information stored on our networks or those of our customers or other business partners could be accessed and modified, misappropriated, publicly disclosed, lost or stolen, our data or computer systems may be corrupted, and we may be subject to liability to our customers, vendors, business partners and others, and suffer reputational and financial harm. We could be held liable to our customers or other parties, or be subject to regulatory or other actions. Any compromise of our security could result in a loss of confidence in our security measures, a loss of existing and prospective customers, and subject us to litigation, civil or criminal penalties, and negative reputational impact and publicity that could adversely affect our business relationships, financial condition and results of operations. Any compromise of our security could result in a loss of confidence in our security measures, and subject us to litigation, civil or criminal penalties, and negative publicity that could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. We could also suffer other negative consequences, including significant remediation costs, significant increased cybersecurity protection costs, loss of material revenues resulting from attacks on our satellites or technology, and the unauthorized use of proprietary information or the failure to retain or attract customers following an attack.

We cannot guarantee that any costs and liabilities incurred in relation to an attack or incident will be covered by our existing insurance policies or that applicable insurance will be available to us in the future on economically reasonable terms or at all. Further, if we are unable to comply with the security standards established by banks and the payment card industry, we may be subject to fines, restrictions, and expulsion from card acceptance programs, which could adversely affect our operations.

A Significant Portion of Our Revenues Is Derived from a Few of Our Contracts

A small number of our contracts account for a significant percentage of our revenues. Our five largest contracts generated approximately 16% of our total revenues in fiscal year 2024. The failure of these customers or any of our key distributors to place additional orders or to maintain their contracts with us for any reason, including any downturn in their business or financial condition or our inability to renew our contracts with these customers or obtain new contracts when they expire, could materially harm our business and impair the value of our common stock.

Our Development Contracts May Be Difficult for Us to Comply with and May Expose Us to Third-Party Claims for Damages, and We May Experience Losses from Fixed-Price Contracts

We are often party to government and commercial contracts involving the development of new products. We derived approximately 12% of our total revenues for fiscal year 2024 from these development contracts. We derived approximately 16% of our total revenues for fiscal year 2023 from these development contracts. These contracts typically contain strict performance obligations and project milestones. We cannot assure you we will comply with these performance obligations or meet these project milestones in the future. If we are unable to comply with these performance obligations or meet these milestones, our customers may terminate these contracts and, under some circumstances, recover damages or other penalties from us. We are not currently, nor have we always been, in compliance with all outstanding performance obligations and project milestones in our contracts. We cannot assure you that the other parties to any such contract will not terminate the contract or seek damages from us. If other parties elect to terminate their contracts or seek damages from us, it could materially harm our business and impair the value of our common stock.

A substantial majority of revenues in our government systems and commercial networks segments are derived from contracts with fixed prices. These contracts carry the risk of potential cost overruns because we assume all of the cost burden. We assume greater financial risk on fixed-price contracts than on other types of contracts because if we do not anticipate technical problems, estimate costs accurately or control costs during performance of a fixed-price contract, it

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may significantly reduce our net profit or cause a loss on the contract. In the past, we have experienced significant cost overruns and losses on fixed-price contracts. Because many of these contracts involve new technologies and applications and can last for years, unforeseen events, such as technological difficulties, fluctuations in the price of raw materials, a significant increase in or a sustained period of increased inflation, problems with our suppliers and cost overruns, can result in the contractual price becoming less favorable or even unprofitable to us over time (which, especially in the case of sharp increases in or significant sustained inflation, could happen quickly and have long-lasting impacts). Furthermore, if we do not meet contract deadlines or specifications, we may need to renegotiate contracts on less favorable terms, be forced to pay penalties or liquidated damages or suffer major losses if the customer exercises its right to terminate. We believe a high percentage of our contracts in our government systems and commercial networks segments will be at fixed prices in the future. Although we attempt to accurately estimate costs for fixed-price contracts, we cannot assure you our estimates will be adequate or that substantial losses on fixed-price contracts will not occur in the future. If we are unable to address any of the risks described above, it could materially harm our business, financial condition and results of operations, and impair the value of our common stock.

Our Reliance on a Limited Number of Third Parties to Manufacture and Supply Our Products and the Components Contained therein Exposes Us to Various Risks

We expect our internal manufacturing capacity to be limited to supporting new product development activities, building customized products that need to be manufactured in strict accordance with a customer’s specifications or delivery schedules, and building proprietary, highly sensitive Viasat-designed products and components for use in our proprietary technology platform. Therefore, our internal manufacturing capacity has been, and is expected to continue to be, very limited and we intend to continue to rely on contract manufacturers to produce the majority of our products. In addition, some components, subassemblies and services necessary for the manufacture of our products are obtained from a sole source supplier or a limited group of suppliers.

Our reliance on contract manufacturers and on sole source suppliers or a limited group of suppliers involves several risks. We may not be able to obtain an adequate supply of required components, and our control over the price, timely delivery, reliability and quality of finished products may be reduced. The process of manufacturing our products and some of our components and subassemblies is extremely complex. We have in the past experienced and may in the future experience delays in the delivery of and quality problems with products and components and subassemblies from vendors. Some of the suppliers we rely upon have relatively limited financial and other resources. Significant events such as an outbreak of a pandemic such as the COVID-19 pandemic and its lingering effects, natural disasters or extreme weather events (including as a result of climate change), acts of terrorism or civil unrest, cyberattacks, labor market instability or global shortages of components or materials may cause temporary or long-term disruptions in our supply chain and distribution systems and/or delays in the delivery of inventory. If we are not able to obtain timely deliveries of components and subassemblies of acceptable quality or if we are otherwise required to seek alternative sources of supply or to substitute alternative technology, or to manufacture our finished products or components and subassemblies internally, our ability to satisfactorily and timely complete our customer obligations could be negatively impacted which could result in reduced sales, termination of contracts and damage to our reputation and relationships with our customers. This failure could also result in a customer terminating our contract for default. A default termination could expose us to liability and have a material adverse effect on our ability to compete for future contracts and orders. In addition, a delay in our ability to obtain components and equipment parts from our suppliers may affect our ability to meet our customers’ needs and may have an adverse effect upon our profitability.

We Depend on a Limited Number of Key Employees Who Would Be Difficult to Replace

We depend on a limited number of key technical, marketing and management personnel with a longstanding knowledge of Viasat's business to manage and operate our business. In particular, we believe our success depends to a significant degree on our ability to attract and retain highly skilled personnel, including our Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer (Mark Dankberg), and those highly skilled design, process and test engineers involved in the manufacture of existing products and the development of new products and processes. In particular, we believe our success depends to a significant degree on our ability to attract and retain highly skilled personnel, including our Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer (Mark Dankberg), our Vice Chairman (Richard Baldridge), and those highly skilled design, process and test engineers involved in the manufacture of existing products and the development of new products and processes. The competition for these types of personnel is intense, and the loss of key employees could materially harm our business and impair the value of our common stock. To the extent that the demand for qualified personnel exceeds supply, we could experience higher labor, recruiting or training costs to attract and retain such employees, or experience difficulties in performing under our contracts if our needs for such employees were unmet.

Because We Conduct Business Internationally, We Face Additional Risks, including Risks Related to Global Political and Economic Conditions, Sanctions, Changes in Regulation and Currency Fluctuations

Approximately 29% of our total revenues in fiscal year 2024 were derived from international sales. Conducting business internationally involves additional risks, including unexpected changes in laws, policies and regulatory requirements (including regulations related to import-export control); increased cost of localizing systems in foreign

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countries; increased sales and marketing and R&D expenses; timing and availability of export licenses; political and economic instability, wars, insurrections and other conflicts, such as the ongoing conflict between Russia and Ukraine; issues related to the political relationship between the United States and other countries; fluctuations in currency exchange rates (including their effect on sales denominated in foreign currencies), foreign exchange controls and restrictions on cash repatriation; compliance with international laws and U.S. laws affecting the activities of U.S. companies abroad, including existing and future privacy and cyber-related laws; challenges in staffing and managing foreign operations; difficulties in managing distributors; requirements for additional liquidity to fund our international operations; availability of suitable export financing; ineffective legal protection of our intellectual property rights in certain countries; potentially adverse tax consequences; potential difficulty in making adequate payment arrangements; potential difficulty in collecting accounts receivable; and imposition of taxes, tariffs, embargoes, sanctions and other trade barriers. For example, in January 2024 the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People’s Republic of China imposed sanctions on “ViaSat” in accordance with China’s Anti-Foreign Sanctions Law, which sanctions may materially restrict our ability to conduct business in China, either directly or through subsidiaries or affiliated companies, and could lead to the seizure of assets located within the People’s Republic of China. While we believe the applicability and enforcement of these sanctions is restricted solely to Viasat, Inc., thereby permitting all subsidiaries and affiliate entities to continue operating in China, this could change at any time. In addition, some of our customer purchase agreements are governed by foreign laws, which may differ significantly from U.S. laws and we may be limited in our ability to enforce our rights under these agreements and to collect damages, if awarded. As a result of these and other risks, we may be unsuccessful in implementing our business plan for our business internationally, or we may not be able to achieve the revenues that we expect. If we are unable to address any of the risks described above, it could materially harm our business and impair the value of our common stock.

Due to the global nature of our operations, we are subject to the complex and varying tax laws and rules of many countries and have material tax-related contingent liabilities that are difficult to predict or quantify. We are also subject to tax audits, including with respect to transfer pricing, in the United States and other jurisdictions and our tax positions may be challenged by tax authorities. There can be no assurance that our current tax provisions will be settled for the amount