Quiver Quantitative

Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - ROAD

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Item 1A. Risk Factors.
An investment in our Class A common stock involves risks. You should carefully read and consider the following risks, as well as all of the other information contained in this report, before making an investment decision. Our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected by any of these risks. As a result, the trading price of our Class A common stock could decline, and you could lose all or part of your investment. The risks described below are not the only ones that we face. Additional risks not presently known to us or that we currently consider immaterial also may adversely affect us.
Risks Related to our Business
A significant slowdown or decline in economic conditions, particularly in the southeastern United States, could adversely impact our results of operations.
We currently operate in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina. A significant slowdown or decline in economic conditions or uncertainty regarding the economic outlook in the United States generally, or in any of these states particularly, could reduce demand for infrastructure projects. Demand for infrastructure projects depends on overall economic conditions, the need for new or replacement infrastructure, the priorities placed on various projects funded by governmental entities and federal, state and local government spending levels. In particular, low tax revenues, credit rating downgrades, budget deficits and financing constraints, including timing and amount of federal funding and competing governmental priorities, could negatively impact the ability of government agencies to fund existing or new public infrastructure projects. In addition, any instability in the financial and credit markets could negatively impact our customers’ ability to pay us on a timely basis, or at all, for work on projects already in progress, could cause our customers to delay or cancel construction projects in our contract backlog, and could create difficulties for customers to obtain adequate financing to fund new construction projects, including through the issuance of municipal bonds.
Our business depends on federal, state and local government spending for public infrastructure construction, and reductions in government funding could adversely affect our results of operations.
During the fiscal year ended September 30, 2021, we generated approximately 61.3% of our construction contract revenues from publicly funded construction projects and the sale of construction materials to public customers at the federal, state and local levels.During the fiscal year ended September 30, 2020, we generated approximately 65.3% of our construction contract revenues from publicly funded construction projects at the federal, state and local levels. As a result, if publicly funded construction decreases due to reduced federal, state or local funding or otherwise, our financial condition, results of operations and liquidity could be materially adversely affected. As a result, if publicly funded construction decreases due to reduced federal, state or local funding or otherwise, our financial condition, results of operations and liquidity could be materially adversely affected.
Federal highway bills provide spending authorizations that represent the maximum amounts available for federally funded construction projects. Each year, Congress passes an appropriation act establishing the amount that can be used for particular programs. The annual funding level is generally tied to receipts of highway user taxes placed in the federal Highway Trust Fund. Once Congress passes the annual appropriation, the federal government distributes funds to each state based on formulas or other procedures. States generally must spend these funds on the specific programs outlined in the federal legislation. In recent years, the Highway Trust Fund has faced insolvency as outlays have outpaced revenues. In recent years, the Highway Trust Fund has faced 8Table of Contentsinsolvency as outlays have outpaced revenues. In recent years, annual shortfalls have been addressed primarily by short-term measures. In November 2021, the IIJA was signed into law, which increases federal spending on surface transportation programs and provides additional funding for highways, bridges and airports over a five-year period. Although the law provides for funding at historically high levels, the timing, nature and scale of the projects for which these funds will be used remains uncertain. As a result, we cannot be assured of the existence, timing or amount of future federal highway funding. Federal highway funding is also subject to uncertainties associated with congressional spending as a whole, including the potential impacts of budget deficits, government shutdowns and federal sequestration. Any reduction in federal highway funding, particularly in the amounts allocated to states in which we operate, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. While the incoming administration has announced an infrastructure stimulus plan, we cannot predict the impact, if any, that it or other proposed changes in law and regulations may have on our business.
Each state funds its infrastructure spending from specially allocated amounts collected from various state taxes, typically fuel taxes and vehicle fees, as well as from voter-approved bond programs. Shortages in state tax revenues can reduce the amount spent or delay expenditures on state infrastructure projects. Many states have experienced state-level funding pressures caused by lower tax revenues and an inability to finance approved projects. To address these pressures, some states have adopted measures to promote stable funding for infrastructure investment, including special-purpose taxes and increased fuel taxes. Any reduction in state infrastructure funding in the states in which we operate could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.
We derive a significant portion of our revenues from state DOTs. The loss of our ability to competitively bid for certain projects or successfully contract with state DOTs could have a material adverse effect on our business.
Our largest customers are state DOTs. During the fiscal year ended September 30, 2021, the Alabama DOT and the North Carolina DOT accounted for 10.8% and 10.3% of our revenues, respectively, and projects performed for all DOTs accounted for 33.7% of our revenues. We believe that we will continue to rely on state DOTs for a substantial portion of our revenues for the foreseeable future. The loss or reduction of our ability to competitively bid for certain projects or successfully contract with a state DOT could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operation and liquidity. See Note 2 - Significant Accounting Policies,
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Concentration of Risks, to the consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report for information relating to concentrations of revenues by type of customer and for a description of our largest customers.
Government contracts generally are subject to a variety of governmental regulations, requirements and statutes, the violation or alleged violation of which could have a material adverse effect on our business.
Our contracts with governmental agencies are generally subject to specific procurement regulations, contract provisions and a variety of socioeconomic requirements relating to their formation, administration, performance and accounting and often include express or implied certifications of compliance. We may be subject to claims for civil or criminal fraud for actual or alleged violations of these governmental regulations, requirements or statutes. In addition, we may also be subject to qui tam litigation brought by private individuals on behalf of the government under the federal False Claims Act, which could include claims for treble damages. Further, if we fail to comply with any of these regulations, requirements or statutes, or if we have a substantial number of workplace safety violations, our existing government contracts could be terminated, and we could be suspended from government contracting or subcontracting, including federally funded projects at the state level. Even if we have not violated these regulations, requirements or statutes, allegations of violations or defending qui tam litigation could harm our reputation and require us to incur material costs to defend any such allegations or lawsuits. Any one or more of these events could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations, cash flow and liquidity.
The cancellation of a significant number of contracts, our disqualification from bidding on new contracts and the unpredictable timing of new project opportunities could have a material adverse effect on our business.
Government contracts typically can be canceled at any time, with us receiving payment only for the work completed. The cancellation of an unfinished contract could result in lost revenues and cause our equipment to be idled for a significant period of time until other comparable work becomes available. In addition, we could be prohibited from bidding on certain government contracts if we fail to maintain qualifications required by those entities. For example, various laws, including those governing wages, benefits, overtime, working conditions, equal employment opportunity, affirmative action and drug testing, provide for mandatory suspension and/or debarment of contractors in certain circumstances involving violations of those laws. In addition, federal and state laws provide for discretionary suspension and/or debarment in certain circumstances, including as a result of being convicted of, or being found civilly liable for, fraud or a criminal offense in connection with obtaining, attempting to obtain or performing a public contract or subcontract. The scope and duration of any suspension or debarment may vary depending upon the facts of a particular case and the grounds for debarment. Finally, the timing of project awards is unpredictable and outside of our control. Project awards, including expansions of existing projects, often involve complex and lengthy negotiations and competitive bidding processes.
If we are unable to accurately estimate the overall risks, revenues or costs on our projects, we may incur contract losses or achieve lower profits than anticipated.9Table of ContentsIf we are unable to accurately estimate the overall risks, revenues or costs on our projects, we may incur contract losses or achieve lower profits than anticipated.
Pricing on fixed unit price contracts is based on approved quantities irrespective of our actual costs, and contracts with a fixed total price require that the work be performed for an agreed-upon price irrespective of our actual costs. We only generate profits on fixed unit price and fixed total price contracts when our revenues exceed our actual costs, which requires us to accurately estimate our costs, control our actual costs and avoid cost overruns. If our cost estimates are too low or if we do not perform the contract within our cost estimates, then cost overruns may cause us to incur a loss or cause the contract not to be as profitable as we expected. The costs incurred and profit realized, if any, on our contracts can vary, sometimes substantially, from our original projections due to a variety of factors, including, but not limited to:
the failure to include materials or work in a bid, or the failure to estimate properly the quantities or costs needed to complete a fixed total price contract;
delays caused by weather conditions or otherwise failing to meet scheduled acceptance dates;
contract or project modifications or conditions creating unanticipated costs that are not covered by change orders;
changes in the availability, proximity and costs of materials, including liquid asphalt cement, aggregates and other construction materials, as well as fuel and lubricants for our equipment;
to the extent not covered by contractual cost escalators, variability in, and our inability to predict, the costs of diesel fuel, liquid asphalt and cement;
the availability and skill level of workers;
onsite conditions that differ from those assumed in the original bid;
the failure by our suppliers, subcontractors, designers, engineers or customers to perform their obligations;
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fraud, theft or other improper activities by our suppliers, subcontractors, designers, engineers, customers or our own personnel;
mechanical problems with our machinery or equipment;
citations issued by a government authority, including OSHA or MSHA;
difficulties in obtaining required government permits or approvals;
changes in applicable laws and regulations;
uninsured claims or demands from third parties for alleged damages arising from the design, construction or use and operation of a project of which our work is part; and
public infrastructure customers seeking to impose contractual risk-shifting provisions that result in increased risks to us.
These and other factors may cause us to incur losses, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or liquidity.
Because our industry is capital-intensive and we have significant fixed and semi-fixed costs, our profitability is sensitive to changes in volume.
The property, plants and equipment needed to produce our products and provide our services can be very expensive. We must spend a substantial amount of capital to purchase and maintain such assets. Although we believe our current cash balance, along with our projected internal cash flows and available financing sources, will provide sufficient cash to support our currently anticipated operating and capital needs, if we are unable to generate sufficient cash to purchase and maintain the property, plants and equipment necessary to operate our business, or if the timing of payments on our receivables is delayed, we may be required to reduce or delay planned capital expenditures or to incur additional indebtedness. In addition, due to the level of fixed and semi-fixed costs associated with our business, particularly at our HMA production facilities, aggregates facilities and our mobile equipment fleets, volume decreases could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or liquidity. In addition, due to the level of fixed and semi-fixed costs associated with our business, particularly at our HMA production facilities, volume decreases could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or liquidity.
The success of our business depends, in part, on our ability to execute on our acquisition strategy, to successfully integrate acquired businesses and to retain key employees of acquired businesses.10Table of ContentsThe success of our business depends, in part, on our ability to execute on our acquisition strategy, to successfully integrate acquired businesses and to retain key employees of acquired businesses.
Since our inception, we have acquired and integrated 31 complementary businesses, which have contributed significantly to our growth. We continue to evaluate strategic acquisition opportunities that have the potential to support and strengthen our business, including acquisitions in the southeastern United States, as part of our ongoing growth strategy. We cannot predict the timing or size of any future acquisitions. To successfully acquire a significant target, we may need to raise additional equity and/or incur additional indebtedness, which could increase our leverage level. There can be no assurance that we will be able to identify and complete acquisition transactions on favorable terms, or at all. The investigation of acquisition candidates and the negotiation, drafting and execution of relevant agreements, disclosure documents and other instruments require substantial management time and attention and costs for accountants, attorneys and others. If we fail to complete any acquisition for any reason, including events beyond our control, the costs incurred up to that point for the proposed acquisition likely would not be recoverable.
Acquisitions typically require integration of the acquired company’s estimation, project management, finance, information technology, risk management, purchasing and fleet management functions. We may be unable to successfully integrate an acquired business into our existing business, and an acquired business may not be as profitable as we had expected or at all. Acquisitions involve risks that the acquired business will not perform as expected and that our expectations concerning the value, strengths and weaknesses of the acquired business will prove incorrect. Our inability to successfully integrate new businesses in a timely and orderly manner could increase costs, reduce profits or generate losses and prevent us from realizing expected rates of return on an acquired business. Factors affecting the successful integration of an acquired business include, but are not limited to, the following:
our responsibility for certain liabilities of an acquired business, whether or not known to us, which could include, among other things, tax liabilities, product and other tort liabilities, breach of contract claims, environmental liabilities, permitting and regulatory compliance issues and liabilities for employment practices;
our ability to retain local managers and key employees who are important to the operations of an acquired business;
the attention required by our senior management and the management of an acquired business for integration efforts, which could decrease the time that they have to service and attract customers;
our ability to effectively utilize new equipment that we acquire;
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the implementation of our financial and management information systems, business practices and policies;
our pursuit of multiple acquisition opportunities simultaneously; and
unforeseen expenses, complications and delays, including difficulties in employing sufficient staff and maintaining operational and management oversight.
In addition, potential acquisition targets may be in states in which we do not currently operate, which could result in unforeseen operating difficulties and difficulties in coordinating geographically dispersed operations, personnel and facilities and subject us to additional and unfamiliar legal requirements.
We cannot guarantee that we will achieve synergies and cost savings in connection with future acquisitions. Many of the businesses that we previously acquired, and businesses that we may acquire in the future, could have unaudited financial statements that are prepared by management and are not independently reviewed or audited, and such financial statements could be materially different if they were independently reviewed or audited. We cannot guarantee that we will continue to acquire businesses at valuations consistent with our prior acquisitions or that we will complete future acquisitions at all. We also cannot know whether there will be attractive acquisition opportunities at reasonable prices, that financing will be available or that we can successfully integrate acquired businesses into our existing operations. In addition, our results of operations from these acquisitions could, in the future, result in impairment charges for any of our intangible assets, including goodwill or other long-lived assets, particularly if economic conditions worsen unexpectedly.
We may lose business to competitors that underbid us and may be unable to compete favorably in our highly competitive industry.
Most of our project awards are determined through a competitive bidding process in which price is the determining factor. Because of the high cost of transporting HMA, our ability to win a project award is often influenced by the distance between a work site and our HMA plants. We compete against multiple competitors in many of the markets in which we operate. Some of our competitors are larger than we are and are vertically integrated. As a result, our competitors may be able to bid at lower prices than we can due to the location of their plants or as a result of their size or vertical integration advantages. Government funding for public infrastructure projects is limited, contributing to competition for the limited number of public projects available. An increase in competition may result in a decrease in new project awards to us at acceptable profit margins. In addition, in the event of a downturn in private residential and commercial construction, the competition for available public infrastructure projects could intensify, which could materially and adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations or liquidity. In addition, in the event of a downturn in private 11Table of Contentsresidential and commercial construction, the competition for available public infrastructure projects could intensify, which could materially and adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations or liquidity.
We may be unable to obtain or maintain sufficient bonding capacity, which could preclude us from bidding on certain projects.
A significant number of our contracts require performance and payment bonds. Sureties typically issue or continue bonds on a project-by-project basis, and they can decline to do so at any time or require the posting of additional collateral as a condition thereto. Our ability to obtain performance and payment bonds primarily depends on our capitalization, working capital, past performance, management expertise, reputation and certain external factors, including the overall capacity of the surety market. Events that adversely affect the insurance and bonding markets generally may result in bonding becoming more difficult or costly to obtain in the future. If we are unable to obtain or renew a sufficient level of bonding, or if bonding costs were to increase, we may be precluded from bidding on certain projects or successfully contracting with certain customers, which could limit the aggregate dollar amount of contracts that we are able to pursue. In addition, even if we are able to successfully renew or obtain performance or payment bonds, we may be required to post letters of credit in connection with such bonds, which could negatively affect our liquidity and results of operations.
Our business is seasonal and subject to adverse weather conditions, which can adversely impact our business.
Our construction operations occur outdoors in an area of the country in which hurricanes, tornadoes and tropical storms are common and snow frequently occurs in certain markets in the winter.Our construction operations occur outdoors in an area of the country in which hurricanes, tornadoes, tropical storms are common and snow frequently occurs in certain markets in the winter. As a result, seasonal changes and adverse weather conditions, such as extended snowy, rainy or cold weather, can adversely affect our business operations through a decline in the use and production of HMA, a decline in the demand for our construction services, alterations and delays in our construction schedules, and reduced efficiencies in our contracting operations, resulting in under-utilization of crews and equipment and lower contract profitability. Climate change may lead to increased extreme weather and changes in precipitation and temperature, including natural disasters. Should the impact of climate change be significant or occur for lengthy periods of time, our financial condition or results of operations would be adversely affected.
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We depend on our information technology systems and processes, which are subject to cybersecurity and data leakage risks.
We depend on information technology systems and infrastructure that could be damaged or interrupted by a variety of factors. Any significant breach, breakdown, destruction or interruption of these systems has the potential to negatively affect our operations. We could experience a business interruption, theft of information or reputational damage as a result of a cyber attack, such as the infiltration of a data center, or data leakage of confidential information either internally or through our third-party providers. Although we have invested in the protection of our data and information technology to reduce these risks and periodically test the security of our information systems network, there can be no assurance that our efforts will prevent breakdowns or breaches in our systems that could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and liquidity. Similarly, our suppliers rely extensively on computer systems to process transactions and manage their businesses and, thus, are also at risk from, and may be impacted by, cybersecurity attacks. An interruption in the business operations of our suppliers and other third parties with which we do business resulting from a cybersecurity attack could indirectly impact our business operations.
Design-build contracts subject us to the risk of design errors and omissions.
Design-build contracts are used as a method of project delivery that provides the owner with a single point of responsibility for both design and construction. We generally subcontract design responsibility to architectural and engineering firms. However, in the event of a design error or omission that causes damages, there is a risk that the subcontractor and/or its errors and omissions insurance would not be able to absorb the full amount of the liability incurred. In this case, we may be responsible for the remaining liability, which could damage our reputation and adversely affect our financial position, results of operations, cash flows and liquidity.
From time to time, we enter into joint venture contracts to perform certain projects, and these arrangements expose us to certain risks and uncertainties that are outside of our control.

From time to time, we perform construction projects as part of a joint venture, under which our relationship to the other joint venture partners is governed by a written contract. Participation in these arrangements exposes us to risks and uncertainties, including the risk that our partners may fail to perform under the contracts, which could subject us to contractual liability. Participation in these arrangements exposes us to risks and uncertainties, including the risk that our partners may fail to perform under the contracts, which could subject us to contractual liability. In addition, if our partners are not able or willing to provide their share of capital investment to fund the operations of the venture or the joint venture arrangement is terminated, there could be unanticipated costs to complete the project, or we could be liable for financial penalties or liquidated damages. In the event that we are not the controlling partner in the joint venture, we may have limited control over the decisions made with respect to the project. The occurrence of any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations, cash flows and liquidity.
Our continued success requires us to hire, train and retain qualified personnel and subcontractors in a competitive industry.
The success of our business depends on our ability to attract, train and retain qualified, reliable personnel, including, but not limited to, our executive officers and key management personnel. In addition, we rely on engineers, project management personnel, and other employees and qualified subcontractors who possess the necessary and required experience and expertise to perform their respective services at a reasonable and competitive rate. Competition for these and other experienced personnel is intense, and it may be difficult to attract and retain qualified individuals with the requisite expertise and within the time frame demanded by our customers. In certain geographic areas, for example, we may not be able to satisfy the demand for our services because of our inability to successfully hire, train and retain qualified personnel. Also, it could be difficult to replace personnel who hold credentials that may be required to perform certain government projects and/or who have significant government contract experience.
As some of our executives and other key personnel approach retirement age, we must provide for smooth transitions, which may require that we devote time and resources to identify and integrate new personnel into vacant leadership roles and other key positions. If we are unable to attract and retain a sufficient number of skilled personnel or effectively implement appropriate succession plans, our ability to pursue projects and our strategic plan may be adversely affected, the costs of executing both our existing and future projects may increase, and our financial performance may decline.
In addition, the cost of providing our services, including the extent to which we utilize our workforce, affects our profitability. For example, the uncertainty of contract award timing can present difficulties in matching our workforce size with our contracts. If an expected contract award is delayed or not received, we could incur costs resulting from excess staff or redundancy of facilities that could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our results of operations can be adversely affected by labor shortages, turnover and labor cost increases.

Labor is a primary component of operating our business. A number of factors may adversely affect the labor force available to us or increase labor costs from time to time, including high employment levels, federal unemployment subsidies, including unemployment benefits offered in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and other government regulations. Although we have not experienced any material disruptions due to labor shortages to date, we have observed an overall tightening and increasingly competitive labor market. A sustained labor shortage or increased turnover rates within our employee base, whether caused by COVID-19 or as a result of
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general macroeconomic factors, could lead to increased costs, such as increased overtime to meet demand and increased wage rates to attract and retain employees, and could negatively affect our ability to complete our construction projects according to the required schedule or otherwise efficiently operate our business. If we are unable to hire and retain employees capable of performing at a high level, or if mitigation measures we may take to respond to a decrease in labor availability, such as overtime and third-party outsourcing, have unintended negative effects, our business could be adversely affected. In addition, we distribute our products and receive raw materials primarily by truck. Reduced availability of trucking capacity due to shortages of drivers, primarily as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, has caused an increase in the cost of transportation for us and our suppliers. An overall labor shortage, lack of skilled labor, increased turnover or labor inflation, caused by COVID-19 or as a result of general macroeconomic factors, could have a material adverse impact on our operations, results of operations, liquidity or cash flows.

We depend on third parties for equipment and supplies essential to operate our business.
We rely on third parties to sell or lease real property, plants and equipment to us and to provide us with supplies, including liquid asphalt cement, aggregates and other construction materials necessary for our operations. The inability to purchase or lease the properties, plants or equipment that are necessary for our operations could severely impact our business. If we lose our supply contracts and receive insufficient supplies from third parties to meet our customers’ needs, or if our suppliers experience price increases or disruptions to their business, such as labor disputes, supply shortages, financial or regulatory difficulties or distribution problems, our ability to bid for or complete contracts could be impaired, in which case our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity and cash flows would be materially and adversely affected.
Supply chain issues, including shortages of raw materials needed for HMA production, equipment, vehicles and construction supplies, could increase our costs or cause delays in our ability to complete our projects, which could have an adverse impact on our business and our relationships with customers.

We rely on our supply chain for raw materials to manufacture HMA and for equipment, vehicles and construction supplies in order to complete our projects. A reduction or interruption in supply, including disruptions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a significant natural disaster, shortages in global freight capacity, significant increases in the price of critical components and raw materials, a failure to appropriately forecast or adjust our requirements based on our business needs, or volatility in demand for our products and services could materially adversely affect our business, operating results, and financial condition and could materially damage customer relationships. Our vendors and subcontractors also may be unable to meet our demand, significantly increase lead times for deliveries or impose significant price increases that we are unable to offset through alternate sources of supply, price increases to our customers or increased productivity in our operations. In some cases, we procure certain inputs and services from single or limited suppliers or subcontractors. In the event of supply disruptions from these suppliers or subcontractors, we may not be able to diversify our resources for such materials or services in a timely manner or may experience quality issues with alternate sources. Our growth and ability to meet customer demand depend in large part on our ability to obtain timely deliveries of raw materials, plant components, equipment and vehicles from our suppliers, and significant disruptions in their supply could materially adversely affect our business, operating results, and financial condition and could materially damage customer relationships.

We consume natural gas, electricity, diesel fuel, liquid asphalt and other petroleum-based resources that are subject to potential reliability issues, supply constraints and significant price fluctuations.
In our production and distribution processes, we consume significant amounts of natural gas, electricity, diesel fuel, liquid asphalt and other petroleum-based resources. The availability and pricing of these resources are subject to market forces that are beyond our control, such as unavailability due to refinery turnarounds, higher prices charged for petroleum-based products, and other factors. Furthermore, we are vulnerable to any reliability issues experienced by our suppliers, which also are beyond our control. Our suppliers contract separately for the purchase of such resources, and our sources of supply could be interrupted if our suppliers are unable to obtain these materials due to higher demand or other factors that interrupt their availability. Additionally, increases in the costs of fuel and other petroleum-based products utilized in our operations, particularly increases following a bid based on lower costs for such products, could result in a lower profit, or a loss, on a contract. Variability in the supply and prices of these resources could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and liquidity.
Our contract backlog is subject to reductions in scope and cancellations and therefore could be an unreliable indicator of our future earnings.13Table of ContentsOur contract backlog is subject to reductions in scope and cancellations and therefore could be an unreliable indicator of our future earnings.
At September 30, 2021, our contract backlog was $966.2 million, compared to $608.1 million at September 30, 2020. Our contract backlog generally consists of construction projects for which we either have an executed contract or commitment with a client or have submitted the current low bid. Contract backlog does not include external sales of HMA, aggregates, and liquid asphalt cement. Moreover, our contract backlog reflects our expected revenues from the contract, commitment or bid, which is often subject to revision over time. We cannot guarantee that the revenues projected in our contract backlog will be realized or, if realized, will be profitable. Projects reflected in our contract backlog may be affected by project cancellations, scope adjustments, time extensions or other changes. Such changes may adversely affect the revenues and profit we ultimately realize on these projects.
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Failure of our subcontractors to perform as expected could have a negative impact on our results.
We rely on third-party subcontractors to perform some of the work on many of our contracts, but we are ultimately responsible for the successful completion of their work. Although we often require bonding or other forms of guarantees from our subcontractors, we are not always able to obtain such bonds or guarantees. In situations where we are unable to obtain a bond or guarantee, we may be responsible for the failures on the part of our subcontractors to perform as anticipated. In addition, if the total costs of a project exceed our original estimates, we could experience reduced profits or a loss for that project.
The construction services industry is highly schedule-driven, and our failure to meet the schedule requirements of our contracts could adversely affect our reputation and/or expose us to financial liability.
In some instances, including in the case of many of our fixed unit price contracts, we guarantee that we will complete a project by a certain date. Any failure to meet the contractual schedule or satisfy the completion requirements set forth in our contracts could subject us to responsibility for costs resulting from the delay, generally in the form of contractually agreed-upon liquidated damages, liability for our customer’s actual costs arising out of our delay, reduced profits or a loss on that project, and/or damage to our reputation, any of which could have a material adverse impact on our financial position, results of operations, cash flows and liquidity.
An inability to secure sufficient aggregates reserves could have a negative impact on our future results of operations.An inability to secure sufficient aggregate reserves could have a negative impact on our future results of operations.
Strict governmental regulations and the limited number of properties containing useful aggregates reserves have made it increasingly challenging and costly to obtain sufficient aggregates to support our business, both with respect to internal use and third-party sales.Strict governmental regulations and the limited number of properties containing useful aggregate reserves have made it increasingly challenging and costly to obtain sufficient aggregates to support our business, both with respect to internal use and third-party sales. If we are unable to obtain adequate reserves to support our business, then our financial position, results of operations, cash flows and liquidity may be adversely affected.
A failure to obtain or maintain adequate insurance coverage could adversely affect our results of operations.
We maintain insurance coverage as part of our overall risk management strategy and pursuant to our financing agreements and a majority of our contracts that require us to maintain specific types and amounts of coverage.We maintain insurance coverage as part of our overall risk management strategy and pursuant to requirements contained in our financing agreements and in a majority of our contracts to maintain specific types and amounts of coverage. Although we have been able to obtain reasonably priced insurance coverage to meet our requirements in the past, there is no assurance that we will be able to do so in the future. For example, catastrophic events can result in decreased coverage limits, more limited coverage, and increased premium costs or deductibles. If we are unable to obtain adequate insurance coverage, we would be subject to increased out-of-pocket expenses in the event of a claim and we may not be able to procure certain contracts, either of which could materially adversely affect our financial position, results of operations, cash flows or liquidity.
We may be unable to identify and contract with qualified “disadvantaged business enterprises” to perform as subcontractors, which could cause us to breach certain contracts with governmental customers.
Some of our contracts with governmental agencies contain minimum “disadvantaged business enterprise” (“DBE”) participation clauses, which require us to maintain a requisite level of DBE participation. If we fail to obtain or maintain the required level of DBE participation, we could be held responsible for breach of contract. Such a breach could impair our ability to bid on future projects and could require us to pay monetary damages. To the extent that we are responsible for monetary damages, the total costs of the project could exceed our original estimates, we could experience reduced profits or a loss for that project and there could be a material adverse impact to our financial position, results of operations, cash flows or liquidity.
Failure to maintain safe work sites could result in significant losses, which could materially affect our business and reputation.17Table of ContentsFailure to maintain safe work sites could result in significant losses, which could materially affect our business and reputation.
Because our employees and others are often in close proximity with mechanized equipment, moving vehicles, chemical substances and dangerous manufacturing processes, our construction and maintenance sites are potentially dangerous workplaces. Therefore, safety is a primary focus of our business and is critical to our reputation and performance. We are often responsible for safety on the project sites where we work. In addition, many of our customers require that we meet certain safety criteria to be eligible to bid on contracts, and some of our contract fees or profits are subject to satisfying safety criteria. Unsafe work conditions also can increase employee turnover, which increases project costs and therefore our overall operating costs. If we fail to implement effective safety procedures, our employees could be injured, the completion of a project could be delayed, or we could be exposed to investigations and possible litigation. Our failure to maintain adequate safety standards through our safety programs could also result in reduced profitability or the loss of projects or clients.
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Legal and Regulatory Risks
We could incur material costs and losses as a result of claims that our products do not meet regulatory requirements or contractual specifications.
We provide our customers with products designed to comply with building codes or other regulatory requirements, as well as any applicable contractual specifications, including, but not limited to, with respect to durability, compressive strength and weight-bearing capacity. If our products do not satisfy these requirements and specifications, material claims may arise against us, our reputation could be damaged and, if any such claims are for an uninsured, non-indemnified or product-related matter, then resolution of such claim against us could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or liquidity.
We are, and may continue to be, involved in routine litigation and government inquiries in the ordinary course of business.

Due to the nature of our business, we are involved in routine litigation or subject to other disputes or claims related to our business activities, including, among other things, workers’ compensation claims, employment-related disputes and issues related to liability, breach of contract or tortious conduct in connection with our performance of services and provision of materials. We are also subject to government inquiries in the ordinary course of business seeking information concerning our compliance with government construction contracting requirements and various laws and regulations, the outcome of which cannot be predicted with certainty. The outcomes of these inquiries and legal proceedings are not expected to have a material effect on our financial position or results of operations on an individual basis, although adverse outcomes in a significant number of such ordinary course inquiries and legal proceedings could, in the aggregate, have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Environmental laws and regulations and any changes to, or liabilities arising under, such laws and regulations could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and liquidity.
Our operations are subject to stringent and complex federal, state and local laws and regulations governing the discharge of materials into the environment or otherwise relating to environmental protection and public health and safety. These laws and regulations impose numerous obligations applicable to our operations, including requirements to obtain a permit or other approval before conducting regulated activities; restrictions on the types, quantities and concentration of materials that can be released into the environment; limitations on activities on certain lands lying within wilderness, wetlands, and other protected areas; and assessments of substantial liabilities for pollution resulting from our operations. For example, a number of governmental bodies have finalized, proposed or are contemplating legislative and regulatory actions to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, such as monitoring, reporting and emissions control requirements for certain large sources of greenhouse gases and greenhouse gas cap-and-trade programs. Because we emit greenhouse gases through the manufacture of HMA products and through the combustion of fossil fuels as part of our mining and road construction services, any such laws and regulations applicable to jurisdictions in which we operate could require us to incur costs to reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with our operations. Because we emit greenhouse gases through the manufacture of HMA products and through the combustion of fossil fuels as part of our mining and road 15Table of Contentsconstruction services, any such laws and regulations applicable to jurisdictions in which we operate could require us to incur costs to reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with our operations.
We have in the past been, and may in the future be, required to remediate contaminated properties currently or formerly owned or operated by us or third-party facilities that receive waste generated by our operations, regardless of whether such contamination resulted from our own actions or those of others and whether such actions complied with applicable laws at the time they were taken. In connection with certain acquisitions, we could assume, or be required to provide indemnification against, environmental liabilities that could expose us to material losses. Furthermore, the existence of contamination at properties that we own, lease or operate could result in increased operational costs or restrictions on our ability to use those properties as intended, including for mining purposes.
Numerous government authorities, such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (the “EPA”) and analogous state agencies, have the power to enforce compliance with these laws and the permits issued under them. Such enforcement actions often involve difficult and costly compliance measures or corrective actions. Certain environmental laws impose strict liability (i.e., no showing of “fault” is required) or joint and several liability for costs required to remediate and restore sites where hazardous substances, hydrocarbons or solid wastes have been stored or released. Failure to comply with these laws and regulations may result in the assessment of sanctions, including administrative, civil or criminal penalties, compensatory damages, the imposition of investigatory or remedial obligations, and the issuance of orders limiting or prohibiting some or all of our operations. In addition, we may experience delays in obtaining, or be unable to obtain, required permits, which may delay or interrupt our operations and limit our growth and revenue.
In certain instances, citizen groups also have the ability to bring legal proceedings against us if we are not in compliance with environmental laws, or to challenge our ability to receive environmental permits that we need to operate. In addition, claims for damages to persons or property, including natural resources, may result from the environmental, health and safety impacts of our operations. Our insurance may not cover all environmental risks and costs or may not provide sufficient coverage if an environmental claim is made against us. Moreover, public interest in the protection of the environment has increased dramatically in recent years. The trend of more expansive and stringent environmental legislation and regulations applied to our industry could continue, resulting in increased costs of doing business and, consequently, affecting profitability.
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Climate change and related laws and regulations could adversely affect us.
The potential impact of climate change on our operations and our customers remains uncertain. The primary risk that climate change poses to our business is the potential for increases in the volume, frequency and intensity of rainfall and tropical storms, which would impair our ability to perform our construction projects. Climate change could also lead to disruptions in our supply chain, thereby impairing our production capabilities, or the distribution of our products due to major storm events or prolonged adverse conditions, changing temperature levels or flooding from sea level changes, especially in our coastal markets. These changes could be severe and could negatively impact demand for our products and services. In addition, governmental initiatives to address climate change could, if adopted, restrict our operations, require us to make capital expenditures to comply with these initiatives, increase our costs, impact our ability to compete or negatively impact efforts to obtain permits, licenses and other approvals for existing and new facilities. Our inability to timely respond to the risks posed by climate change and the costs of compliance with climate change laws and regulations could have a material adverse impact on us.

Our operations are subject to special hazards that may cause personal injury or property damage, subjecting us to liabilities and possible losses that may not be covered by insurance.

Operating hazards inherent in our business, some of which may be outside of our control, can cause personal injury and loss of life, damage to or destruction of property, and environmental damage. We maintain insurance coverage in amounts and against risks that we believe are consistent with industry practice, but this insurance may be inadequate or unavailable to cover all losses or liabilities we may incur in our operations. Our insurance policies are subject to varying levels of deductibles. Losses up to our deductible amounts are accrued based on our estimates of the ultimate liability for claims incurred and an estimate of claims incurred but not reported. However, liabilities subject to insurance are difficult to estimate due to unknown factors, including the severity of an injury, the determination of our liability in proportion to other parties, the number of unreported incidents and the effectiveness of our safety programs. If we experience insurance claims or costs above our estimates, we may be required to use working capital to satisfy these claims rather than for maintaining or expanding our operations.
Mandatory COVID-19 vaccination of employees could impact our workforce and have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
On November 5, 2021, OSHA published an emergency temporary standard mandating that all employers with at least 100 employees require all of their employees to be fully vaccinated on or before January 4, 2022 or tested weekly for COVID-19 (the “ETS”). As a company with more than 100 employees, we are subject to the ETS. At this time, it is not possible to predict with certainty whether the ETS will remain in effect or be invalidated by the courts, and we cannot predict the exact impact that the ETS will have on us or on our workforce. If the ETS takes effect, the ETS may result in employee attrition, which could materially adversely affect future revenues and costs and could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

Our failure to comply with immigration laws could result in significant liabilities, harm our reputation with our customers and disrupt our operations.
Although we take steps to verify the employment eligibility status of all our employees, some of our employees may, without our knowledge, be unauthorized workers. Unauthorized workers are subject to deportation and may subject us to fines or penalties and, if any of our workers are found to be unauthorized, we could experience adverse publicity that could make it more difficult to hire and retain qualified employees. Termination of a significant number of unauthorized employees may disrupt our operations, cause temporary increases in our labor costs as we train new employees and result in additional adverse publicity. We could also become subject to fines, penalties and other costs related to claims that we did not fully comply with all recordkeeping obligations of federal and state immigration laws. If we fail to comply with these laws, our operations may be disrupted, and we may be subject to fines or, in extreme cases, criminal sanctions. In addition, many of our customer contracts specifically require compliance with immigration laws, and, in some cases, our customers audit compliance with these laws. Further, several of our customers require that we ensure that our subcontractors comply with these laws with respect to the workers that perform services for them. A failure to comply with these laws or to ensure compliance by our subcontractors could damage our reputation and may cause our customers to cancel contracts with us or to not award future business to us. These factors could adversely affect our results of operations and financial position.
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Financial Risks
Our substantial indebtedness could adversely affect our financial condition and prevent us from fulfilling our obligations.
Our debt consists primarily of our borrowings under the Credit Agreement, which, as of September 30, 2021, provided for a $200.0 million Term Loan and a $225.0 million Revolving Credit Facility. A significant portion of our cash flow is required to pay interest and principal on our outstanding indebtedness, and we may be unable to generate sufficient cash flow from operations, or have future borrowings available, to enable us to repay our indebtedness or to fund other liquidity needs. Among other consequences, this level of indebtedness could:
require us to use a significant percentage of our cash flow from operations for debt service and the satisfaction of repayment obligations, and not for other purposes;
limit our ability to borrow money or issue equity to fund our working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions and debt service requirements;
cause our interest expense to increase if there is a general increase in interest rates, because a portion of our indebtedness bears interest at floating rates;
limit our flexibility in planning for or reacting to changes in our business and future business opportunities;
cause us to be more highly leveraged than some of our competitors, which may place us at a competitive disadvantage;
make us more vulnerable to a downturn in our business or the economy; and
limit our ability to exploit business opportunities.
Although the Credit Agreement restricts our ability to incur additional indebtedness, these restrictions are subject to a number of qualifications and exceptions, and we could incur substantial additional indebtedness in compliance with these restrictions. This could reduce our ability to satisfy our current obligations and further exacerbate the risks to our financial condition described above.
The Credit Agreement restricts our ability to engage in some business and financial transactions.
The Credit Agreement contains a number of covenants that limit our ability to incur additional indebtedness or guarantees, create liens on assets, change our or our subsidiaries’ fiscal year, enter into sale and leaseback transactions, enter into certain restrictive agreements, engage in mergers or consolidations, participate in partnerships and joint ventures, sell assets, incur additional liens, pay dividends or distributions and make other restricted payments, make investments, loans or advances, repay or amend the terms of subordinated indebtedness, make acquisitions, enter into certain operating leases, enter into certain hedge transactions, amend material contracts, and engage in certain transactions with affiliates. The Credit Agreement also requires us to maintain a fixed charge coverage ratio and a consolidated leverage ratio and contains certain customary representations and warranties, affirmative covenants and events of default (including, among others, an event of default upon a change of control).The Credit Agreement also requires us to maintain a fixed charge coverage ratio and a consolidated leverage ratio and contains certain customary representations and warranties, affirmative covenants and events of default (including, among others, an event of default upon a change of control). If an event of default occurs, the lenders under the Credit Agreement will be entitled to accelerate amounts due thereunder and take other actions permitted to be taken by a secured creditor. If our indebtedness is accelerated, we cannot be certain that we will have sufficient funds available to pay the accelerated indebtedness or that we will have the ability to refinance the accelerated indebtedness on terms favorable to us or at all.
The previously announced phase-out of LIBOR, or the replacement of LIBOR with a different reference rate, may adversely affect the interest rate that we pay on our indebtedness.

The annual interest rates applicable to advances made under the Credit Agreement is calculated, at our option, by using either a base rate or LIBOR, in each case plus an applicable margin percentage that corresponds to our consolidated total leverage ratio. In 2017, the United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority, which regulates LIBOR, announced that it would phase out LIBOR by the end of 2021. However, the ICE Benchmark Administration, in its capacity as administrator of USD LIBOR, has announced that it intends to extend publication of USD LIBOR (other than one-week and two-month tenors) by 18 months to June 2023. It is unclear whether new methods of calculating LIBOR will be established such that it continues to exist after 2023, or whether alternative rates or benchmarks will be adopted. Changes in the method of calculating LIBOR, or the replacement of LIBOR with an alternative rate or benchmark, may adversely affect interest rates, including the rates we pay on borrowings under the Credit Agreement, and result in higher borrowing costs. The Credit Agreement provides that, upon the occurrence of certain triggering events relating to the end of LIBOR, we and the administrative agent under the Credit Agreement will select a different benchmark rate to replace LIBOR as the reference rate for interest accruing on certain advances. Changes in, or the inability to agree on, an alternative rate or benchmark may negatively impact the terms of such indebtedness.
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We may need to raise additional capital in the future for working capital, capital expenditures and/or acquisitions, and we may not be able to do so on favorable terms or at all, which could impair our ability to operate our business or achieve our growth objectives.
Our ongoing ability to generate cash is important for funding our continuing operations, making acquisitions and servicing our indebtedness. To the extent that existing cash balances and cash flow from operations, together with borrowing capacity under our Revolving Credit Facility, are insufficient to make investments or acquisitions or provide needed working capital, we may require additional financing from other sources. Our ability to obtain such additional financing in the future will depend in part on prevailing market conditions, as well as conditions in our business and our operating results. Furthermore, if global economic, political or other market conditions adversely affect the financial institutions that provide credit to us, it is possible that our ability to draw upon our Revolving Credit Facility may be impacted. If adequate funds are not available, or are not available on acceptable terms, we may not be able to make certain investments, take advantage of acquisitions or other opportunities, or respond to competitive challenges, each of which could have a material adverse impact on our financial position, results of operations, cash flows and liquidity.
We may be required to record an impairment charge if we determine that goodwill recorded in connection with prior acquisitions has become impaired, and this determination requires us to make significant judgments and assumptions about the future that are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties.
At September 30, 2021 and 2020, we had $85.4 million and $46.3 million, respectively, of goodwill recorded on our Consolidated Balance Sheets. We assess goodwill for impairment annually or more often if required. Our assessments involve a number of estimates and assumptions that are inherently subjective and require significant judgment regarding highly uncertain matters that are subject to change. The use of different assumptions or estimates could materially affect the determination as to whether or not an impairment has occurred. In addition, if future events are less favorable than what we assumed or estimated in our impairment analysis, we may be required to record an impairment charge, which could have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.
Our earnings are affected by the application of accounting standards and our critical accounting policies, which involve subjective judgments and estimates by our management. Our actual results could differ from the estimates and assumptions used to prepare our consolidated financial statements.
The accounting standards that we use in preparing our financial statements are often complex and require us to make significant estimates and assumptions in interpreting and applying those standards. These estimates and assumptions affect the reported values of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and the disclosure of contingent liabilities. We make critical estimates and assumptions involving accounting matters, including with respect to revenue recognition, contracts receivable including retainage, valuation of long-lived assets and goodwill, income taxes, accrued insurance costs and share-based payments and other equity transactions. These estimates and assumptions involve matters that are inherently uncertain and require us to make subjective and complex judgments. Although we believe we have the experience and processes to enable us to formulate appropriate assumptions and produce reasonably dependable estimates, these assumptions and estimates may change significantly in the future and could result in the reversal of previously recognized revenues and profit. If we used different estimates and assumptions or used different methods to determine these estimates, our financial results could differ, which could have a material negative impact on our financial condition and reported results of operations. For more information about our critical accounting policies and use of estimates, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates.”
General Risks
Force majeure events, such as natural disasters, pandemics and terrorist attacks, and unexpected equipment failures could negatively impact our business, which may affect our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
Force majeure events, such as terrorist attacks, pandemics or natural disasters, have impacted, and could continue to negatively impact, the United States economy and the markets in which we operate. As an example, from time to time, we face unexpected severe weather conditions, evacuation of personnel and curtailment of services, increased labor and material costs or shortages, inability to deliver materials, equipment and personnel to work sites in accordance with contract schedules and loss of productivity. We seek to include language in our contracts with private customers that grants us certain relief in connection with force majeure events, and we attempt to mitigate the potential impact arising from force majeure events in both public and private customer contracts. However, the extra costs incurred as a result of these events may not be reimbursed by our customers, and we remain obligated to perform our services after most extraordinary events, subject to any relief that may be available pursuant to a force majeure clause. Additionally, our manufacturing processes depend on critical pieces of equipment, such as our HMA plants. This equipment, on occasion, may be out of service as a result of unanticipated failures or damage. Any significant interruption in production capability may require us to make significant capital expenditures to remedy problems or damage and cause us to lose revenues due to lost production time. These force majeure events may affect our operations or those of our customers or suppliers and could impact our revenues, production capability and ability to complete contracts in a timely manner.
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Our business could be materially and adversely affected by a widespread outbreak of a contagious disease or other similar adverse public health development, such as COVID-19, or fear of such an event, and the measures that federal, state and local governments, agencies, law enforcement and health authorities implement to address it.
Our business could be adversely impacted by the effects of a widespread outbreak of a contagious disease, including the COVID-19 pandemic or a similar adverse public health development, as well as actions taken by federal, state and local governments, agencies, law enforcement and health authorities to contain the outbreak. Such an event in our markets could, among other things, result in employee absences or require us to temporarily close our facilities or project sites, which, in turn, could significantly and adversely affect our productivity and our ability to complete projects in accordance with our contractual obligations. In addition, a disruption in the supply chain for raw materials or equipment, whether as a result of facility closures or otherwise, could increase our labor and materials costs and impair our ability to manufacture HMA. In addition, a disruption in the supply chain for raw materials or equipment, whether as a result of facility closures or otherwise, could increase our labor and 14Table of Contentsmaterials costs and impair our ability to manufacture HMA. Moreover, our customers – both public and private – who are adversely impacted could cancel or delay current or prospective projects and could become delinquent in their payments to us for work that we have performed. Although several of these risks have materialized in varying degrees as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, none of these risks, individually or in the aggregate, have significantly impacted our operations to date.

Our business could also be negatively impacted over the medium-to-longer term if the disruptions related to the COVID-19 pandemic decrease consumer confidence generally or significantly prolong the current economic downturn, which could lead to a decline in public and private development projects and thereby reduce demand for our services. An economic slowdown caused by the outbreak of an infectious disease or other similar adverse public health development could cause, and in some cases have caused, the tax revenues received by federal, state and local government agencies to decline and thereby decrease the funding available for public projects. Such developments could (i) impair our ability to undertake construction projects in a typical manner or at all, generate revenues and cash flows, and/or access the capital or lending markets (or significantly increase the costs of doing so); (ii) increase the costs or decrease the supply of raw materials or equipment or the availability of subcontractors and other talent, including as a result of infections or quarantining; and/or (iii) result in the diversion of public funds that otherwise would be available for infrastructure projects to support public health efforts. The inherent uncertainty surrounding COVID-19, due in part to rapidly changing governmental directives, public health challenges and progress, and market reactions thereto, also makes it challenging for our management to estimate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the future performance of our business.
We have incurred, and expect to continue to incur, substantial costs as a result of being a public company, which may significantly affect our financial condition. We have incurred, and expect to continue to incur, substantial costs as a result of being a public company, which may significantly affect our financial condition.
As a public company, we incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses associated with our financial reporting and corporate governance requirements, including requirements under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”) and the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010 and rules implemented by the SEC. For example, as a publicly traded company, we are required to adopt policies regarding internal controls and disclosure controls and procedures, including the preparation of reports on internal control over financial reporting. For example, as a publicly traded company, we are required to adopt policies 18Table of Contentsregarding internal controls and disclosure controls and procedures, including the preparation of reports on internal control over financial reporting. These rules and regulations have made, and may continue to make, it more difficult and more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance, and we may be required to accept reduced policy limits and coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain the same or similar coverage. As a result, it may be more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified individuals to serve on our board of directors or as executive officers.
If we are unable to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting, investors could lose confidence in our consolidated financial statements and our Company, which could have a material adverse effect on our stock price.
We have designed and implemented a number of internal controls and other remedial measures that we believe will provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of our financial reporting and the preparation of our financial statements in accordance with GAAP. A failure to maintain effective internal controls could result in a material misstatement of our consolidated financial statements that would not be prevented or detected on a timely basis, which could cause investors to lose confidence in our financial information or cause the trading price of our Class A common stock to decline and impact our liquidity, perceived creditworthiness and ability to complete acquisitions.
We have incurred, and expect to continue to incur, significant costs related to certain requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (“Section 404”). If we are unable to timely comply with such requirements, our profitability, stock price, results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected. If we are unable to obtain adequate reserves to support our business, then our financial position, results of operations, cash flows and liquidity may be adversely affected.

We are required to comply with certain provisions of Section 404, which requires that we document and test our internal control over financial reporting and issue management’s assessment of our internal control over financial reporting. Section 404 also requires that our independent registered public accounting firm opine on those internal controls. Section 404 also requires that our independent registered public accounting firm opine on those internal controls when we cease to qualify for an exemption from the requirement to provide auditors’ attestation on internal controls afforded to emerging growth companies under the JOBS Act. The out-of-pocket costs, the diversion of management’s attention from running the day-to-day operations and operational changes caused by the need to comply with the requirements of Section 404 have been significant, and we expect to continue to incur substantial costs in connection with our compliance efforts. If we fail to comply with the requirements of Section 404, or if we or our auditors identify and report any material weaknesses, the accuracy and timeliness of the filing of our annual and quarterly reports may be materially adversely affected and could cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which could have a negative effect on the trading price
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of our Class A common stock. In addition, a material weakness in the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting could result in an increased chance of fraud and the loss of customers, reduce our ability to obtain financing, subject us to investigations by the SEC or other regulatory authorities and require additional expenditures to comply with these requirements, each of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Risks Relating to Ownership of Our Class A Common Stock
The dual class structure of our common stock has the effect of concentrating voting control with SunTx Capital Partners (“SunTx”) and its affiliates, which limits your ability to influence corporate matters.
Our Class B common stock has ten votes per share, and our Class A common stock has one vote per share. As of November 19, 2021, our outstanding Class B common stock represented approximately 74.1% of the total voting power of our outstanding common stock. The shares of Class B common stock are held primarily by SunTx, its affiliates and certain members of management. Because of the ten-to-one voting ratio between our Class B common stock and our Class A common stock, the holders of our Class B common stock collectively control a majority of the combined voting power of our common stock and therefore control the outcome of all matters submitted to our stockholders. This concentrated control limits or precludes the ability of holders of Class A common stock to influence corporate matters for the foreseeable future. Future transfers of shares of our Class B common stock generally may result in those shares converting into shares of our Class A common stock. The conversion of shares of our Class B common stock into our Class A common stock will have the effect, over time, of increasing the relative voting power of each remaining share of Class B common stock.
Future sales, or the perception of future sales, of Class A common stock by us or our existing stockholders in the public market could cause the market price for our Class A common stock to decline.
As of November 19, 2021, we had outstanding a total of 40,738,074 shares of our Class A common stock and 11,632,270 shares of our Class B common stock that are convertible at any time into an equal number of shares of our Class A common stock.As of December 9, 2020, we had outstanding a total of 33,875,884 shares of our Class A common stock and 17,905,861 shares of our Class B common stock that are convertible at any time into an equal number of shares of our Class A common stock. The sale of shares of our Class A common stock, or the perception of future sales by us or our existing stockholders, could harm the prevailing market price of shares of our Class A common stock. These sales, or the possibility that these sales may occur, also might make it more difficult for us to sell equity securities in the future at a time and at a price that we deem appropriate.
Pursuant to a registration rights agreement, SunTx and certain other stockholders will continue to have the right, subject to certain conditions, to require us to register the sale of their shares of common stock under the Securities Act. By exercising their registration rights and selling a large number of shares, these stockholders could cause the prevailing market price of our Class A common stock to decline. As of November 19, 2021, a total of 3,861,613 shares of our outstanding common stock were subject to potential future registration under the registration rights agreement. As of December 9, 2020, a total of 17,387,734 shares of our outstanding common stock were subject to potential future registration under the registration rights agreement. Registration of these shares would result in such shares becoming freely tradable upon effectiveness of the registration statement. As restrictions on resale end or if the stockholders who are party to the registration rights agreement exercise their registration rights, the market price of the shares of our Class A common stock could drop significantly if the holders of these shares sell them or are perceived by the market as intending to sell them. These factors could also make it more difficult for us to raise additional funds through future offerings of our Class A common stock or other securities.
In the future, we may also issue our securities in connection with offerings or acquisitions, and the number of shares issued or issuable thereafter could constitute a material portion of the then-outstanding shares of Class A common stock. Any such issuance would result in dilution to holders of our Class A common stock.
Affiliates of SunTx control us, and their interests may conflict with ours or yours in the future.
As of November 19, 2021, the SunTx funds beneficially owned approximately 1.7% of our outstanding Class A common stock and approximately 82.1% of our outstanding Class B common stock, representing 61.3% of the combined voting power of our common stock. Each share of our Class B common stock has ten votes per share, and each share of our Class A common stock has one vote per share. As a result, affiliates of SunTx have the ability to elect all of the members of our board of directors and thereby control our policies and operations, including the appointment of management, future issuances of our Class A common stock or other securities, the payment of dividends, if any, on our Class A common stock, our ability to incur or issue debt, amendments to our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws, and our entry into extraordinary transactions. This concentration of voting control could deprive you of an opportunity to receive a premium for your shares of our Class A common stock as part of a sale of our Company and ultimately might affect the market price of our Class A common stock. In addition, we have engaged, and expect to continue to engage, in related party transactions involving SunTx and certain companies they control. As a result, the interests of affiliates of SunTx may not in all cases be aligned with your interests.
In addition, SunTx may have an interest in pursuing acquisitions, divestitures and other transactions that, in its judgment, could enhance its investment, even though such transactions might involve risks to you. For example, SunTx could cause us to make acquisitions that increase our indebtedness or cause us to sell revenue-generating assets. SunTx is in the business of making investments in companies and may from time to time acquire and hold interests in businesses that compete directly or indirectly with
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us. Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation provides that none of SunTx, any of its affiliates or any director who is not employed by us or his or her affiliates will have any duty to refrain from engaging, directly or indirectly, in the same business activities or similar business activities or lines of business in which we operate. SunTx also may pursue acquisition opportunities that may be complementary to our business, and, as a result, those acquisition opportunities may not be available to us.
So long as SunTx and its affiliates continue to beneficially own a sufficient number of shares of our Class B common stock, they will continue to be able to effectively control our decisions, even if the number of shares of outstanding Class B common stock is limited in proportion to the total number of shares of common stock outstanding. For example, assuming our Class B common stock amounted to 15% of our total outstanding common stock, we would have 44,514,793 shares of Class A common stock outstanding and 7,855,551 shares of Class B common stock outstanding as of November 19, 2021. These outstanding shares of Class B common stock would collectively represent approximately 63.8% of the overall voting power of our common stock. For example, assuming our Class B common stock amounted to 15% of our total outstanding common stock, we would have 44,014,484 shares of Class A common stock outstanding and 7,767,261 shares of Class B common stock outstanding as of December 9, 2020. These outstanding shares of Class B common stock would collectively represent approximately 63.8% of the overall voting power of our common stock. Shares of our Class B common stock may be transferred to an unrelated third party if holders of a majority of the shares of our Class B common stock owned by SunTx and its affiliates consent to such transfer in writing in advance.
We may issue preferred stock with terms that could adversely affect the voting power or value of our Class A common stock.20Table of ContentsWe may issue preferred stock with terms that could adversely affect the voting power or value of our Class A common stock.
Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation authorizes us to issue, without the approval of our stockholders, one or more classes or series of preferred stock having such designations, preferences, limitations and relative rights, including preferences over our Class A common stock with respect to dividends and distributions, as our board of directors may determine. The terms of one or more classes or series of preferred stock could adversely impact the voting power or value of our Class A common stock. For example, we might grant holders of preferred stock the right to elect some number of our directors in all events or upon the happening of specified events or the right to veto specified transactions. Similarly, the repurchase or redemption rights or liquidation preferences we might assign to holders of preferred stock could affect the residual value of our Class A common stock.
Provisions in our governing documents and Delaware corporate law make it more difficult to effect a change in control of our Company, which could adversely affect the price of our Class A common stock.
Certain provisions in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws and Delaware corporate law could delay or prevent a change in control of our Company, even if that change would be beneficial to our stockholders. Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws contain provisions that may make acquiring control of our Company difficult, including:
a dual class common stock structure, which currently provides SunTx and its affiliates and the other holders of our Class B common stock with the ability to control the outcome of matters requiring stockholder approval, so long as they continue to beneficially own a sufficient number of shares of our Class B common stock, even if they own significantly less than 50% of the total number of shares of our outstanding common stock;
a classified board of directors with three-year staggered terms;
provisions regulating the ability of our stockholders to nominate directors for election or to bring matters for action at annual meetings of our stockholders;
limitations on the ability of our stockholders to call a special meeting;
the ability of our board of directors to adopt, amend or repeal bylaws, and the requirement that the affirmative vote of holders representing at least 66 2/3% of the voting power of all outstanding shares of capital stock be obtained for stockholders to amend our amended and restated bylaws;
the requirement that the affirmative vote of holders representing at least 66 2/3% of the voting power of all outstanding shares of capital stock be obtained to remove directors or amend our amended and restated certificate of incorporation; and
the authority of our board of directors to issue and set the terms of preferred stock without the approval of our stockholders.
These provisions also could discourage proxy contests and make it more difficult for you and other stockholders to elect directors and take other corporate actions. As a result, these provisions could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire us, even if doing so would benefit our stockholders, which may limit the price that investors are willing to pay for shares of our Class A common stock.
Our g