Quiver Quantitative

Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - QDMI

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Item 1A. Risk Factors

Our business is subject to many significant risks, as more fully described in this section entitled “Risk Factors”. If any of the risks discussed in this Report actually occur, our business, financial condition or operating results could be materially and adversely affected. In particular, our risks include, but are not limited to, the following:

Our operating subsidiary derives a significant portion of revenues from selling insurance products supplied by our major insurance company partners and our business is subject to concentration risks arising from dependence on a single or limited number of insurance company partners.

We incurred net losses in the past and there can be no assurance that we will be able to become profitable in the future.

Our business, financial condition and results of operations have been and may continue to be materially adversely affected by the COVID-19 epidemic in China and Hong Kong.

Our independent auditor has expressed substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

All of our sales of life and medical insurance products and general insurance products are conducted through our licensed technical representatives. If we are unable to attract and retain highly productive technical representatives, our business could be materially and adversely affected. Misconduct of the technical representatives may also have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

We are subject to extensive regulations for our insurance brokerage business and operations in Hong Kong. Failure to obtain, renew, or retain licenses, permits or approvals may affect our ability to conduct or expand our business.

We face intense competition in the insurance intermediary industry in Hong Kong. If we are unable to compete effectively with both existing and new market participants, we may lose customers and our financial results may be negatively affected.

Our commission revenue is subject to both quarterly and annual fluctuations as a result of the seasonality of our business, the timing of policy renewals and the net effect of new and lost business. The factors that cause the quarterly and annual variations are not within our control.

The Series B and Series Convertible Preferred Stock, which are controlled by Mr. Huihe Zheng, our Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer, have super voting rights that may adversely affect our holders of common stock; in addition, Mr. Zheng, as our controlling stockholder, may exercise significant influence over us and may be subject to conflicts of interest.

We are subject to political and legal risks associated with conducting business in Hong Kong.

Our disclosure controls and procedures are not effective and we have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting.

An investment in our securities is highly speculative and involves substantial risks, including the risks described below. You should carefully consider all of the risks described below, together with the other information contained in this Report, before making a decision to invest in our securities. The risks highlighted here are not the only ones that we may face. For example, additional risks presently unknown to us or that we currently consider immaterial or unlikely to occur could also impair our operations. If any of the risks or uncertainties described below or any such additional risks and uncertainties actually occur, our business, prospects, financial condition or results of operations could be negatively affected, and you might lose all or part of your investment.

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

Our business is subject to concentration risks arising from dependence on a single or limited number of insurance company partners.

We derive a significant portion of revenues from selling insurance products supplied by our major insurance company partners. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, an aggregate of 88.85% of our total commissions were attributed to our top two insurance companies, each accounted for more than 10% of our total revenue. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, an aggregate of 94.34% of our total commissions were attributable to our top three insurance companies, each accounted for more than 10% of our total revenue.

Because of this concentration in the supply of the insurance products we sell, our business and operations would be negatively affected if we experience a partial or complete loss of any of these insurance partners. In addition, any significant adverse change in our relationship with any of these insurance company partners could result in loss of revenue, increased costs and distribution delays that could harm our business and customer relationships.

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We incurred net losses in the past and may never achieve profitability in the future.

We had a net loss of $304,326 and $488,999in the fiscal years ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. There can be no assurance that we will be able to become profitable in the future. We anticipate that our operating costs and expenses will increase in the foreseeable future as we continue to grow our business, acquire new clients and further develop our service offering and increase brand recognition. These efforts may prove more costly than we currently anticipate, and we may not succeed in increasing our revenues sufficiently to offset these higher expenses. There are other factors that could negatively affect our financial condition. For example, if we fail to compete successfully with our existing or potential competitors, or if the insurance products we sell are not accepted by the market as we expect, we will receive lower-than-expected insurance brokerage income, and our financial results will be adversely affected. If regulatory authorities promulgate new laws, regulations and regulatory requirements that limit our business operations, especially with regard to our fee or cost model, our results of operations will suffer. As a result of the foregoing and other factors, our net profit margins may decline or we may continue to incur net losses in the future and may not be able to achieve profitability on a quarterly or annual basis.

Our business, financial condition and results of operations have been and may continue to be materially adversely affected by the COVID-19 epidemic in China and Hong Kong.

In December 2019, a novel strain of coronavirus, COVID-19, was reported in Wuhan, China. COVID-19 has since spread rapidly to other countries, including the United States, and the World Health Organization formally declared the COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic in March 2020. The pandemic has reached more than 160 countries, resulting in the implementation of significant governmental measures, including lockdowns, closures, quarantines, and travel bans, intended to control the spread of the virus. The Hong Kong government has ordered quarantines, travel restrictions, and the temporary closure of schools, stores, borders and facilities. Companies are also taking precautions, such as requiring employees to work remotely, imposing travel restrictions and temporarily closing businesses.

Our business operations rely heavily on the customers from mainland China and the closure by Hong Kong government of the borders with mainland China, the restriction on travel have significantly reduced the number of our new customers. In addition, limited ability of our sales personnel to interact with customers face-to-face as result of the social distance measures has hindered the sales activities of our sales force, which has had a material adverse impact on our operating results of the period from January 2020 to the date of this Report and the operating income for the same period significantly decreased on a year-over-year basis.

The duration of such business disruption and the resulting operational and financial impact on us have negatively affected our financial results for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021 and may continue to adversely affect our business operations for the year ended March 31, 2022. The global spread of COVID-19 pandemic in a significant number of countries around the world has resulted in, and may intensify, global economic distress, and the extent to which it may affect our results of operations will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted. We cannot assure you that the COVID-19 pandemic can be eliminated or contained in the near future, or at all, or a similar outbreak will not occur again. If the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting disruption to our business were to extend over a prolonged period, it could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

Our independent auditor has expressed substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, our independent auditor included an explanatory paragraph in their audit report emphasizing to the readers of the audit report that there is a substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern based upon our net losses and negative cash flows from operations for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021and its levels of working capital as of March 31, 2021. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of these uncertainties. Our consolidated financial statements as of and for the years ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 have also been prepared on a going concern basis which assumes we will be able to realize our assets and discharge our liabilities in the normal course of business for the foreseeable future. We have incurred losses since inception resulting in an accumulated deficit as of March 31, 2021. Management is planning to raise any necessary additional funds to fund our operating expenses through loans and additional sales of our common stock, securities convertible into our common stock, debt securities or a combination of such financing alternatives; however, there can be no assurance that we will be successful in raising any necessary additional capital. If we are not successful in raising additional capital, we may not have enough financial resources to support our business and operations and, as a result, may not be able to continue as a going concern and could be forced to liquidate.

If we fail to attract and retain productive technical representatives to sell the insurance products, our business and operating results could be materially and adversely affected.

All of our sales of life and medical insurance products and general insurance products are conducted through our licensed technical representatives. We have been actively recruiting and will continue to recruit technical representatives to join our distribution and service network. Technical representatives have been instrumental to the development of our life insurance business.

As of March 31, 2021, we had ten technical representatives. Competition for technical representatives is intense and there can be no assurance that we will be able to attract and retain such personnel. If we are unable to attract and retain highly productive technical representatives, our business could be materially and adversely affected.

Misconduct of the technical representatives may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

Misconduct of the technical representatives could result in regulatory sanctions, litigation or serious reputational or financial harm to us.

Misconduct may include:

the use of methods of solicitation and advertising that are not compatible with the integrity and dignity of the profession of insurance broking;

the use of any illustration, circular or memorandum that misrepresents or is incomplete as regards the terms, benefits or advantages of any contract of insurance issued or to be issued to a prospective purchaser of insurance;

the use of any incomplete comparison of any policy or contract of insurance for the purpose of inducing an insured to forfeit or replace a policy or contract of insurance;

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the offer of any payment, allowance or gift as an inducement to any prospective insured to insure through the offeror; and

holding out to the public or advertising by means of advertisements, cards, circulars, letters, signs or other methods in an irresponsible or untruthful manner.

Failure to prevent and detect misconduct may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

We are subject to extensive regulations for our insurance brokerage business and operations.

We conduct our business primarily in Hong Kong and our business operations are subject to vigorous regulations in Hong Kong applicable to licensed insurance brokers. Any failure to comply with applicable laws or regulations could result in fines, censure, suspensions of personnel or other sanctions, including revocation of our license as insurance broker. Even if a sanction imposed against us or our personnel is small in monetary amount, the adverse publicity arising from the imposition of sanctions against us by regulators could harm our reputation and impede our ability to retain customers and develop new customer relationships, which may reduce our revenues.

From time to time, the regulatory landscape in the insurance industry in Hong Kong involves and changes. We face the risk of significant intervention by regulatory authorities, including increased registered capital requirements, extended training of the insurance agencies’ personnel, and adoption of costly or restrictive new regulations and judicial or administrative proceedings. If any restrictive or costly new regulations and rules become effective and applicable to our business, these regulations may materially limit our activities and operational profitability.

Compliance with changing regulation of corporate governance and public disclosure, and our management’s inexperience with such regulations, will result in additional expenses and creates a risk of non-compliance.

Changing laws, regulations and standards relating to corporate governance and public disclosure, including the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and related SEC regulations, have created uncertainty for public companies and significantly increased the costs and risks associated with accessing the public markets and public reporting. Our management team will need to invest significant management time and financial resources to comply with both existing and evolving standards for public companies, which will lead to increased general and administrative expenses and a diversion of management time and attention from revenue generating activities to compliance activities. In addition, our management members who are located in the PRC has little experience with compliance with U.S. laws (including securities laws). This inexperience may cause us to fall out of compliance with applicable regulatory requirements, which could lead to enforcement action against us and a negative impact on our stock price.

Failure to obtain, renew, or retain licenses, permits or approvals may affect our ability to conduct or expand our business.

We are required to obtain applicable licenses, permits and approvals from different Hong Kong regulatory authorities in order to conduct or expand our business. The IA has promulgated various regulations on the insurance business, including regulations requiring an insurance broker license. We obtained, renewed and maintained our insurance broker license as required by the IA. However, there is no assurance that the IA will not issue new regulations governing the insurance product and service industry that might require us to obtain additional licenses, permits or approvals for our current or future business operations. Our failure to obtain any such additional licenses, permits or approvals may adversely our business operations and financial condition.

Competition in our industry is intense and, if we are unable to compete effectively with both existing and new market participants, we may lose customers and our financial results may be negatively affected.

The insurance intermediary industry in Hong Kong is intensely competitive, and we expect competition to persist and further intensify as more insurance broker companies enter the market. In insurance product distribution, we face competition from insurance companies that use their in-house sales force and exclusive sales agents to distribute their products, from business entities that distribute insurance products on an ancillary basis, such as commercial banks, as well as from other traditional insurance intermediaries. Many of our competitors, both existing and newly emerging, have greater financial and marketing resources than we do and may be able to offer products and services that we do not currently offer and may not offer in the future. If we are unable to compete effectively against those competitors, we may lose customers and our financial results may be negatively affected.

Because the commission we earn on the sale of insurance products is based on premiums and commission rates set by insurance companies, any decrease in these premiums or commission rates may have an adverse effect on our results of operations.

We are an insurance broker and derive revenues primarily from commissions paid by the insurance companies whose policies our customers purchase. Our commission rates are set by insurance companies and are based on the types and terms of the insurance products. Commission rates and premiums can change based on the prevailing economic, regulatory, taxation-related and competitive factors that affect insurance companies. These factors, which are not within our control, include the ability of insurance companies to place new business, underwriting and non-underwriting profits of insurance companies, consumer demand for insurance products, the availability of comparable products from other insurance companies at a lower cost, as well as the tax deductibility of commissions and the consumers themselves.

Because we do not determine, and cannot predict, the timing or extent of premium or commission rate changes, we cannot predict the effect any of these changes may have on our operations. Any decrease in premiums or commission rates may significantly affect our profitability.

Quarterly and annual variations in our commission revenue may unexpectedly impact our results of operations.

Our commission revenue is subject to both quarterly and annual fluctuations as a result of the seasonality of our business, the timing of policy renewals and the net effect of new and lost business. During any given year, our commission revenue derived from distribution of life and medical insurance products is highest during the fourth quarter and is lowest during the first quarter. This general seasonality trend was further affected by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, which reduced our first year life insurance commission revenue during 2020 and 2021. The factors that cause the quarterly and annual variations are not within our control. Specifically, regulatory changes to product design may result in cessation of products from time to time and cause quarterly fluctuation in the results of our operations. In addition, consumer demand for insurance products can influence the timing of renewals, new business and lost business, which generally includes policies that are not renewed, and cancellations. As a result, quarterly or annual comparisons of our operating results may not be used as an indication of our future performance.

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Our future success depends on the continuing efforts of our senior management team and other key personnel, and our business may be harmed if we lose their services.

Our future success depends heavily upon the continuing services of the members of our senior management team and other key personnel, in particular, Mr. Huihe Zheng, our President and Chief Executive Officer. If our senior executives or other key personnel, are unable or unwilling to continue in their present positions, we may not be able to replace them easily, or at all. As such, our business may be disrupted and our financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected. Competition for senior management and key personnel in insurance industry is intense because of a number of factors including the limited pool of qualified candidates. We may not be able to retain the services of our senior executives or key personnel, or attract and retain high-quality senior executives or key personnel in the future. In addition, if any member of our senior management team or any of our other key personnel joins a competitor or forms a competing company, we may lose customers, sensitive trade information, key professionals and staff members.

We may not be able to ensure the accuracy and completeness of product information and the effectiveness of our recommendation of insurance products.

Our customers rely on the insurance product information we provide through our technical representatives. While we believe that such information is generally accurate, complete and reliable, there can be no assurance that the accuracy, completeness or reliability of the information can be maintained in the future. If our technical representatives provide any inaccurate or incomplete information due to either their own fault or that of our insurance partners, or we fail to present accurate or complete information of any insurance products which could lead to our customers’ failure to get the protection or we being warned or punished by regulatory authorities, our reputation could be harmed and we could experience reduced businesses, which may adversely affect our business and financial performance.

We may not be able to recommend suitable insurance products to our customers. Our technical representatives may not fully understand the customers’ needs and recommend suitable products to them. In addition, because the technical representatives are compensated based on premiums and commission rates, they may be tempted to sell insurance products with higher commissions rather than those required by or suitable to the customers or prospective customers. If our customers are recommended insurance products that do not suit their protection needs, they may lose trust in the company. Meanwhile, our insurance company partners may find our recommendation ineffective. Our customers may consequently be reluctant to continue to use our services, and our insurance company partners may be hesitant to continue to partner with us. As a result, our business, reputation, financial performance and prospects will be materially and adversely affected.

We may face potential liability, loss of customers and damage to our reputation for any failure to protect the confidential information of our customers.

Our customer database holds confidential information concerning our customers. We may be unable to prevent third parties, such as hackers or criminal organizations, from stealing information provided by our customers. Confidential information of our customers may also be misappropriated or inadvertently disclosed through insurance agents’ misconduct or mistake. We may also in the future be required to disclose to government authorities certain confidential information concerning our customers. Any compromise of our security could have a material adverse effect on our reputation, business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations.

Though we have not experienced any material cybersecurity incidents in the past, if our database was compromised by outside sources or if we were accused of failing to protect the confidential information of our customers, we may be forced to expend significant financial and managerial resources in remedying the situation, defending against these accusations and we may face potential liability. Any negative publicity, especially concerning breaches in our cybersecurity systems, may adversely affect our public image and reputation. Though we take proactive measures to protect against these risks and believe that our efforts in this area are sufficient for our business, there can be no assurance that such measures will prove effective against all cybersecurity risks.

Risks Related to Doing Business in Hong Kong

Potential political and economic instability in Hong Kong may adversely impact our results of operations.

Our operational activities are primarily conducted in Hong Kong. Accordingly, political and economic conditions in Hong Kong and the surrounding region may directly affect our business. Since early 2019, a number of political protests and conflicts have occurred in Hong Kong in connection with proposed legislation that would allow local authorities to detain and extradite people who are wanted in territories that Hong Kong does not have extradition agreements with, including mainland China and Taiwan. The economy of Hong Kong has been negatively impacted, including our retail market, property market, stock market, and tourism, from such protests.

Under the Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China, Hong Kong is exclusively in charge of its internal affairs and external relations, while the government of the PRC is responsible for its foreign affairs and defense. As a separate customs territory, Hong Kong maintains and develops relations with foreign states and regions. We cannot assure you that the Hong Kong protests will not affect Hong Kong’s status as a Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China and thereby affecting its current relations with foreign states and regions.

Our revenue is susceptible to Hong Kong protests as well as any other incidents or factors which affect the stability of the social, economic and political conditions in Hong Kong. As a result of the Hong Kong protests, we experienced a drop in new customers from mainland China beginning in June 2019, which impacted our revenue for the period from June 2019 to the quarter ended June 30, 2020.

It is unclear whether there will be other political or social unrest in the near future or that there will not be other events that could lead to the disruption of the economic, political and social conditions in Hong Kong. If such events persist for a prolonged period of time or that the economic, political and social conditions in Hong Kong are to be disrupted, our overall business and results of operations may be adversely affected.

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The future development of national security laws and regulations in Hong Kong could materially impact our business by possibly triggering sanctions and other measures which can cause economic harm to our business.

On May 28, 2020, the National People’s Congress of the People’s Republic of China approved a proposal to impose a new national security law for Hong Kong and authorized the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress to proceed to work out details of the legislation to be implemented in Hong Kong (the “Decision”). The Decision states that the new law will target secession, subversion of state power, terrorism activities and foreign interference. The stated objective of the Decision is to protect the national security of China as a whole (including Hong Kong and Macau) and is not intended to have a direct commercial bearing on commercial and economic activities. The government believes the new law may bring about more stability to Hong Kong, which in turn may lay the foundation for commercial and economic activities to flourish. On June 30, 2020, China’s National People’s Congress Standing Committee passed the national security law for the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR). Hong Kong’s Chief Executive promulgated it in Hong Kong later the same day. Among other things, it criminalizes separatism, subversion, terrorism and foreign interference in Hong Kong. We cannot rule out the possibility that the Decision and the implementation of the national security law may trigger sanctions or other forms of penalties by foreign governments, which may cause economic and other hardship for Hong Kong, including companies like us that do business in Hong Kong. It is difficult for us to predict the impact, in any, the implementation of the national security law will have on our business, as such impact will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted.

The market price for our securities could be adversely affected by increased tensions between the United States and China.

Recently there have been heightened tensions in the economic and political relations between the United States and China. On June 30, 2020, the Standing Committee of the PRC National People’s Congress issued the Law of the People’s Republic of China on Safeguarding National Security in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. This law defines the duties and government bodies of Hong Kong for safeguarding national security and four categories of offences—secession, subversion, terrorist activities and collusion with a foreign country or external elements to endanger national security—and their corresponding penalties. On July 14, 2020, U.S. President Donald Trump signed the Hong Kong Autonomy Act, or HKAA, into law, authorizing the U.S. administration to impose blocking sanctions against individuals and entities who are determined to have materially contributed to the erosion of Hong Kong’s autonomy. On August 7, 2020, the U.S. government imposed HKAA-authorized sanctions on eleven individuals, including Hong Kong chief executive Carrie Lam. The HKAA further authorizes secondary sanctions, including the imposition of blocking sanctions, against foreign financial institutions that knowingly conduct a significant transaction with foreign persons sanctioned under this authority. The imposition of sanctions such as those provided in the HKAA is in practice discretionary and highly political, especially in a relationship as extensive and complex as that between the United States and China. It is difficult to predict the full impact of the HKAA on Hong Kong and companies like us. Furthermore, legislative or administrative actions in respect of Sino-U.S. relations could cause investor uncertainty for affected issuers, including us, and the market price of our securities could be adversely affected.

Risks Related to Our Common Stock

The limited public trading market may cause volatility in our stock price.

The quotation of our common stock on the OTCQB does not assure that a meaningful, consistent and liquid trading market currently exists, and in recent years such market has experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have particularly affected the market prices of many smaller companies like us. Our common stock is thus and will be subject to significant volatility. Sales of substantial amounts of our common stock, or the perception that such sales might occur, could adversely affect prevailing market prices of our common stock.

An active and visible trading market for our common stock may not develop.

Although our common stock is quoted on the OTCQB marketplace operated by OTC Markets Group, Inc., trading has been very limited and we cannot predict whether an active market for our common stock will develop in the future. We are not applying for the listing of our common stock on a national exchange. In the absence of an active trading market:

investors may have difficulty buying and selling or obtaining market quotations;

market visibility for shares of our common stock may be limited; and

a lack of visibility for shares of our common stock may have a depressive effect on the market price for shares of our common stock.

The OTCQB is an unorganized, inter-dealer, over-the-counter market that provides significantly less liquidity than Nasdaq Stock Market or the New York Stock Exchange. The trading price of the common stock is expected to be subject to significant fluctuations in response to variations in quarterly operating results, changes in analysts’ earnings estimates, announcements of innovations by us or our competitors, general conditions in the industry in which we operate and other factors. These fluctuations, as well as general economic and market conditions, may have a material or adverse effect on the market price of our common stock.

We may not maintain qualification for OTCQB inclusion, and therefore you may be unable to sell your shares.

Our common stock is eligible for quotation on the OTCQB. However, trading of our common stock could be suspended. If for any reason our common stock does not become eligible or maintain eligibility for quotation on the OTCQB or a public trading market does not develop, purchasers of shares of our common stock may have difficulty selling their shares should they desire to do so. If we are unable to satisfy the requirements for quotation on the OTCQB, any quotation in our common stock could be conducted in the “pink sheets” market. As a result, a purchaser of our common stock may find it more difficult to dispose of, or to obtain accurate quotations as to the price of their shares. This would materially and adversely affect the liquidity of our securities.

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Even if a market for our common stock develops, the market price of our common stock may be significantly volatile, which could result in substantial losses for purchasers.

The market price for our common stock may be significantly volatile and subject to wide fluctuations in response to factors including the following:

actual or anticipated fluctuations in our quarterly or annual operating results;

changes in financial or operational estimates or projections;

conditions in markets generally;

changes in the economic performance or market valuations of companies similar to ours; and

general economic or political conditions in the United States or elsewhere.

In some cases, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, stockholders have often instituted class action securities litigation against those companies. Such litigation, if instituted, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management attention and resources, which could significantly harm our business operations and reputation.

If we become directly subject to the scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity involving U.S.-listed Chinese companies, we may have to expend significant resources to investigate and resolve the matter which could harm our business operations, stock price and reputation.

U.S. public companies that have substantially all of their operations in China have been the subject of intense scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity by investors, financial commentators and regulatory agencies, such as the SEC. Much of the scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity has centered on financial and accounting irregularities and mistakes, a lack of effective internal controls over financial accounting, inadequate corporate governance policies or a lack of adherence thereto and, in many cases, allegations of fraud. As a result of the scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity, the publicly traded stock of many U.S. listed Chinese companies sharply decreased in value and, in some cases, has become virtually worthless. Many of these companies are now subject to shareholder lawsuits and SEC enforcement actions and are conducting internal and external investigations into the allegations. Our operations are primarily conducted in Hong Kong but we have depended, and expect to continue to depend, on visitors from mainland China to generate a majority of our revenues. We also seek to establish collaboration with business partners in mainland China. It is not clear what effect this scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity on China based companies will have on us, our business and our stock price, if any. If we become the subject of any unfavorable allegations due to our dependence on Chinese visitors or relationship with business partners in mainland China, whether such allegations are proven to be true or untrue, we will have to expend significant resources to investigate such allegations and/or defend our company. This situation will be costly and time consuming and distract our management from growing our business. If such allegations are not proven to be groundless, we and our business operations will be severely affected and you could sustain a significant decline in the value of our common stock.

Our controlling stockholder may exercise significant influence over us and may be subject to conflicts of interest.

Our Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and President, Huihe Zheng, owns approximately 89.0% of our outstanding voting power. Mr. Zheng thus has the power, on his own, to determine the outcome of any corporate transaction or other matters submitted to our stockholders for approval, including mergers, consolidations and the sale of all or substantially all of our assets, election of directors, approval of equity incentive plans, and other significant corporate actions. Mr. Zheng also has the power to prevent or cause a change in control. In addition, without the consent of Mr. Zheng, we could be prevented from entering into transactions that could be beneficial to us. The interests of Mr. Zheng may differ from the interests of our other stockholders, which cause him to be faced with conflicts of interests that may not be resolved in favor of or to the satisfaction of our minority shareholders.

The Series B and Series Convertible Preferred Stock, which are controlled by our Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer, have super voting rights that may adversely affect our holders of common stock.

Except as required by law, holders of Series B and Series C Preferred Stock (which is currently controlled by Huihe Zheng, our Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer) are entitled to super voting rights. Each share of Series B Preferred Stock is entitled to 100 votes and each share of Series C Preferred Stock is initially entitled to eleven votes for each share of common stock into which such share of Series C Preferred Stock could then be converted. Holders of Series B and Series C Preferred Stock will vote together on all matters upon which common stock holders are entitled to vote. The voting rights of holders of our common stock will be diluted as a result of these super voting rights.

Our common stock may be considered a “penny stock,” and thereby be subject to additional sale and trading regulations that may make it more difficult to sell.

Our common stock, which is currently quoted on OTCQB, may be considered to be a “penny stock” if it does not qualify for one of the exemptions from the definition of “penny stock” under Section 3a51-1 of the Exchange Act, as amended. Our common stock may be a “penny stock” if it meets one or more of the following conditions: (i) the stock trades at a price less than $5.00 per share; (ii) it is NOT traded on a “recognized” national exchange; (iii) it is not quoted on the Nasdaq Capital Market, or even if so, has a price less than $5.00 per share; or (iv) is issued by a company that has been in business less than three years with net tangible assets less than $5 million. The principal result or effect of being designated a “penny stock” is that securities broker-dealers participating in sales of our common stock will be subject to the “penny stock” regulations set forth in Rules 15-2 through 15g-9 promulgated under the Exchange Act. For example, Rule 15g-2 requires broker-dealers dealing in penny stocks to provide potential investors with a document disclosing the risks of penny stocks and to obtain a manually signed and dated written receipt of the document at least two business days before effecting any transaction in a penny stock for the investor’s account. Moreover, Rule 15g-9 requires broker-dealers in penny stocks to approve the account of any investor for transactions in such stocks before selling any penny stock to that investor. This procedure requires the broker-dealer to: (i) obtain from the investor information concerning his or her financial situation, investment experience and investment objectives; (ii) reasonably determine, based on that information, that transactions in penny stocks are suitable for the investor and that the investor has sufficient knowledge and experience as to be reasonably capable of evaluating the risks of penny stock transactions; (iii) provide the investor with a written statement setting forth the basis on which the broker-dealer made the determination in (ii) above; and (iv) receive a signed and dated copy of such statement from the investor, confirming that it accurately reflects the investor’s financial situation, investment experience and investment objectives. Compliance with these requirements may make it more difficult and time consuming for holders of our common stock to resell their shares to third parties or to otherwise dispose of them in the market or otherwise.

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FINRA sales practice requirements may also limit your ability to buy and sell our common stock, which could depress the price of our shares.

FINRA rules require broker-dealers to have reasonable grounds for believing that an investment is suitable for a customer before recommending that investment to the customer. Prior to recommending speculative low-priced securities to their non-institutional customers, broker-dealers must make reasonable efforts to obtain information about the customer’s financial status, tax status and investment objectives, among other things. Under interpretations of these rules, FINRA believes that there is a high probability such speculative low-priced securities will not be suitable for at least some customers. Thus, FINRA requirements make it more difficult for broker-dealers to recommend that their customers buy our common stock, which may limit your ability to buy and sell our shares, have an adverse effect on the market for our shares, and thereby depress our share price.

You may face significant restrictions on the resale of your shares due to state “blue sky” laws.

Each state has its own securities laws, often called “blue sky” laws, which (1) limit sales of securities to a state’s residents unless the securities are registered in that state or qualify for an exemption from registration, and (2) govern the reporting requirements for broker-dealers doing business directly or indirectly in the state. Before a security is sold in a state, there must be a registration in place to cover the transaction, or it must be exempt from registration. The applicable broker-dealer must also be registered in that state.

We do not know whether our securities will be registered or exempt from registration under the laws of any state. A determination regarding registration will be made by those broker-dealers, if any, who agree to serve as market makers for our common stock. We have not yet applied to have our securities registered in any state and will not do so until we receive expressions of interest from investors resident in specific states after they have viewed this Report. There may be significant state blue sky law restrictions on the ability of investors to sell, and on purchasers to buy, our securities. You should therefore consider the resale market for our common stock to be limited, as you may be unable to resell your shares without the significant expense of state registration or qualification.

Our management has determined that our disclosure controls and procedures are not effective and we have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting.

In connection with the preparation of our financial statements for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, our management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was not effective and we identified several material weaknesses. A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. In addition, as of March 31, 2021, our management concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective due to the material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. The material weaknesses result from the following: (i) lack of proper segregation of duties and risk assessment process; (ii) lack of formal documentation in internal controls over financial reporting; and (iii) lack of independent directors and an audit committee.

Each of the material weaknesses described above could result in a misstatement of our accounts or disclosures that would result in a material misstatement of our annual or interim consolidated financial statements that would not be prevented or detected. We cannot assure you that any measures we may take in the future will be sufficient to remediate the material weaknesses described above or avoid potential future material weaknesses. If we are unable to report financial information timely and accurately or to maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures, our stock price could be negatively impacted and we could be subject to, among other things, regulatory or enforcement actions by the SEC.

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our business, or if they change their recommendations regarding our stock adversely, our stock price and trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our common stock will be influenced by the research and reports that industry or securities analysts publish about us or our business. We do not currently have and may never obtain research coverage by industry or financial analysts. If no or few analysts commence coverage of us, the trading price of our stock would likely decrease. Even if we do obtain analyst coverage, if one or more of the analysts who cover us downgrade our stock, our stock price would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts cease coverage of us or fail to regularly publish reports on us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which in turn could cause our stock price or trading volume to decline.

We do not foresee paying cash dividends in the foreseeable future and, as a result, our investors’ sole source of gain, if any, will depend on capital appreciation, if any.

We do not plan to declare or pay any cash dividends on our shares of common stock in the foreseeable future and currently intend to retain any future earnings for funding growth. As a result, investors should not rely on an investment in our securities if they require the investment to produce dividend income. Capital appreciation, if any, of our shares may be investors’ sole source of gain for the foreseeable future. Moreover, investors may not be able to resell their common stock at or above the price they paid for them.

The rights of the holders of common stock may be impaired by the potential issuance of preferred stock.

Our Board of Directors may, without stockholder approval, issue preferred stock with voting, dividend, conversion, liquidation or other rights that could adversely affect the voting power and equity interest of the holders of common stock. Preferred stock, which could be issued with the right to more than one vote per share, could be utilized as a method of discouraging, delaying or preventing a change of control. The possible impact on takeover attempts could adversely affect the price of our common stock. Although we have no present intention to issue any additional shares of preferred stock or to create any new series of preferred stock, we may issue such shares in the future.

19

You may experience additional dilution as a result of future equity offerings.

In order to raise additional capital, we have issued equity securities in the past and may in the future offer additional shares of our common stock or other securities convertible into or exchangeable for our common stock at prices that may not be the same as the price per unit in our previous equity offering. The price per share at which we sell additional shares of our common stock, or securities convertible or exchangeable into common stock, in future transactions, may be lower than the price per share paid by investors in our previous equity offering.

Shares of our common stock that have not been registered under federal securities laws are subject to resale restrictions imposed by Rule 144, including those set forth in Rule 144(i) which apply to a former “shell company.”

Prior to the closing of the Share Exchange, we were deemed a “shell company” under applicable SEC rules and regulations because we had no or nominal operations and either no or nominal assets, assets consisting solely of cash and cash equivalents, or assets consisting of any amount of cash and cash equivalents and nominal other assets. Pursuant to Rule 144 promulgated under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), sales of the securities of a former shell company, such as us, under that rule are not permitted (i) until at least 12 months have elapsed from the date on which our Current Report on Form 8-K reflecting our status as a non-shell company, was filed with the SEC; (ii) unless at the time of a proposed sale, we are subject to the reporting requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act and have filed all reports and other materials required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, as applicable, during the preceding 12 months, other than Form 8-K reports; or (iii) until the effectiveness of a registration statement under the Securities Act relating to our common stock. Therefore, unless we register such shares of common stock for sale under the Securities Act, most of our stockholders will be forced to hold their shares of our common stock for at least that 12-month period before they are eligible to sell those shares, and even after that period, sales may not be made under Rule 144 unless we and the selling stockholders are in compliance with other requirements of Rule 144. Further, it will be more difficult for us to raise funding to support our operations through the sale of debt or equity securities unless we agree to register such securities under the Securities Act, which could cause us to expend significant time and cash resources. Additionally, our previous status as a shell company could also limit our use of our securities to pay for any acquisitions we may seek to pursue in the future (although none are currently planned). The lack of liquidity of our securities as a result of the inability to sell under Rule 144 for a longer period of time than a non-former shell company could cause the market price of our securities to decline.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.

Not applicable.

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