Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - OWPC

-New additions in green
-Changes in blue
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ITEM 1A. Risk Factors

The following important factors, and the important factors described elsewhere in this report or in our other filings with the SEC, could affect (and in some cases have affected) our results and could cause our results to be materially different from estimates or expectations. Other risks and uncertainties may also affect our results or operations adversely. The following and these other risks could materially and adversely affect our business, operations, results or financial condition.

Risks Relating to our Business

Limited Operating History

We are an early-stage company that has generated minimal revenues and we have a limited operating history upon which our business and future prospects may be evaluated. We are subject to all of the business risks and uncertainties associated with any new business enterprise in the cannabis industry, including the risk that we will not achieve our operating goals. In order for us to meet future operating requirements, we will need to successfully grow, harvest and/or sell our cannabis products. Until such time as we are able to fund our business from operations, we will be required to raise funds through various sources, including the sale of equity and debt securities, Failure to generate cash from operations and to reach profitability may adversely affect our success.

We have had a history of losses, we expect losses in the future, and there can be no assurance that we will become profitable in the future.

We have experienced operating losses on an ongoing basis. For the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022, we incurred net losses of $3,953,321 and $3,059,477, respectively. As of such dates, we had accumulated deficits of $26,929,686 and $22,976,365, respectively. We expect our losses to continue for the foreseeable future. These continuing losses may be greater than current levels. If our revenues do not increase substantially or if our expenses exceed our expectations, we may never become profitable. Even if we do achieve profitability, we may not sustain profitability on a quarterly or annual basis in the future.

Our auditor has given us a “going concern” qualification, which questions our ability to continue as a going concern without additional financing.

Our independent certified public accountant has added an emphasis paragraph to its report on our financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2023 regarding our ability to continue as a going concern. Key to this determination is our recurring net losses, an accumulated deficit, and a working capital deficiency. In the event sales do not materialize at expected levels, management would seek additional financing or would conserve cash by further reducing expenses. No assurance can be given that any future financing will be available or, if available, that it will be on terms that are satisfactory to us. Even if we are able to obtain additional financing, it may contain undue restrictions on our operations or cause substantial dilution for our stockholders. If we are unable to obtain additional funds, our ability to carry out and implement our planned business objectives and strategies will be significantly delayed, limited or may not occur. We cannot guarantee that we will become profitable.

Our Wholly-owned Colombian Subsidiary, OWP SAS, is Operating under Court Supervision Pursuant to a Reorganization Proceeding

OWP SAS experienced significant operational and managerial challenges over the past several years, resulting in the accumulation of financial obligations of approximately $1.2 million, which are substantially past due. OWP SAS filed for protection under Colombian Law 1116 of 2006, which is the primary legislation governing business insolvency proceedings (restructuring and liquidation) (“Reorganization Proceedings”) in Colombia on December 22, 2023. There are many risks attendant to the Reorganization Proceeding, including OWP SAS’s ability to obtain approval from the court to conduct its normal business operations, maintain its cannabis licenses, satisfy its financial obligations to its creditors, the availability of operating capital during the pendency of its Restructuring Proceeding, the length of time that the Company will operate in the Reorganization Proceedings and the possibility that it may be unable to obtain any additional funding. Failure to achieve any of these objectives could have a material adverse effect on the business of the Company and OWP SAS.

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Change of Cannabis Laws, Regulations and Guidelines

Cannabis laws and regulations in Colombia and other jurisdictions where we intend to transact business are dynamic and subject to evolving interpretations which could require us to incur substantial costs associated with compliance or alter certain aspects of our business plan. Regulations may be enacted in the future that will be directly applicable to certain aspects of our cultivation, manufacturing and exporting businesses for our cannabis and hemp related products. Regulations may be enacted in the future that will be directly applicable to certain aspects of our businesses. We cannot predict the nature of any future laws, regulations, interpretations or applications, nor can we determine what effect additional governmental regulations or administrative policies and procedures, when and if promulgated, could have on our business. Management expects that the legislative and regulatory environment in the cannabis industry in Colombia and internationally will continue to be dynamic and will require innovative solutions to comply with this changing legal landscape in this nascent industry for the foreseeable future. Compliance with any such legislation may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Public opinion can also exert a significant influence over the regulation of the cannabis industry. A negative shift in the public’s perception of the cannabis industry could affect future legislation or regulation in different jurisdictions.

Reliance on Colombian Licenses, Authorizations and Quotas

Our ability to import seeds, grow, manufacture, distribute and sell cannabis and hemp in Colombia or internationally is dependent on our ability to sustain and/or obtain the necessary licenses and authorizations by certain authorities in Colombia and/or the importing jurisdiction. The licenses and authorizations are subject to ongoing compliance and reporting requirements and our ability to obtain, sustain or renew any such licenses and authorizations on acceptable terms is subject to changes in regulations and policies and to the discretion of the applicable authorities or other governmental agencies in foreign jurisdictions. Failure to comply with the requirements of the licenses or authorizations or any failure to maintain the licenses or authorizations would have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and operating results. In addition, Colombian regulators limit the cultivation and sale of psychoactive cannabis by quotas issued on an annual basis to licensed producers.

Although we believe that we will meet the requirements to obtain, sustain or renew the necessary licenses and authorizations, there can be no guarantee that the applicable authorities will issue these licenses or authorizations. In addition, to date we have not been issued quotas from Colombian regulatory authorities that would allow us to commence the commercial sale of psychoactive cannabis products in Colombia. In addition, to date we have not been issued Quotas that would allow us to commence the commercial sale of psychoactive cannabis products. Should the authorities fail to issue the necessary licenses or authorizations, including required quotas, we may be curtailed or prohibited from the production and/or distribution of cannabis and hemp or from proceeding with the development of our operations as currently proposed and our business, financial condition and results of the operation may be materially adversely affected.

Regulatory Compliance Risks

Achievement of our business objectives of becoming a producer of raw cannabis and hemp related products is contingent, in part, upon compliance with regulatory requirements enacted by applicable governmental authorities and obtaining all regulatory approvals, where necessary, for the sale of our products in Colombia and other jurisdictions where we intend to distribute and sell our products. We will incur ongoing costs and obligations related to regulatory compliance. Failure to comply with applicable laws, regulations and permitting requirements may result in enforcement actions thereunder, including orders issued by regulatory or judicial authorities causing operations to cease or be curtailed, and may include corrective measures requiring capital expenditures, installation of additional equipment, or remedial actions. Civil or criminal fines or penalties may be imposed on us for violations of applicable laws or regulations. Vigorous enforcement of these laws could require extensive changes to our operations, increase our compliance costs or give rise to material liabilities, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Competition

There are many companies engaged in the cannabis business who we will compete with, including larger and more established companies with substantially greater marketing, financial, human and other resources than we have. These companies include PharmaCielo, CannaVida, Empresa Colombiana de Cannabis, Khiron Life Sciences Corp., MedCan, Canopy Growth Corporation, and Clever Leaves. Although we believe we are competitively positioned to be a leader in the medicinal cannabis industry given our early entry into the market, the management team’s expertise in medical product branding, marketing, quality control, and market relationships, competition in the medical cannabis industry is growing quickly. As more competitors enter the market, prices may be reduced. We believe our approach in creating brand loyalty will allow us to effectively compete in the market but there is no assurance that will be the case, and our competitors may adopt a similar or identical approach. To date, we have obtained four licenses in Colombia that authorize us to engage in cannabis activities, and there are currently few authorized Colombian producers. However, Colombia offers an open process to apply for licenses and there are no significant barriers to entry. As a result, our ability to generate revenues and earnings may be reduced as competition intensifies, thereby causing a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

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Ability to Establish and Maintain Bank Accounts

Many banking institutions in countries where we or our prospective customers operate will not accept payments related to the cannabis industry due to domestic laws and regulations or pressure exerted by the United States on banks with laws subject to the laws of the United States (including, the Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (USA PATRIOT Act)). Failure to conduct our business through normal banking channels may impede our ability to make payments for goods and services and transact business in the ordinary course. Failure to operate in normal banking channels may also increase our cost of doing business and adversely impact our business. In the event financial service providers do not accept accounts or transactions related to the cannabis industry, it is possible that we may be required to seek alternative payment solutions. If the industry was to move toward alternative payment solutions, we would have to adopt policies and protocols to manage the Company’s exposure to foreign exchange and interest rate risks. If the industry was to move towards alternative payment solutions we would have to adopt policies and protocols to manage our volatility and exchange rate risk exposures. Our inability to effectively manage such risks may adversely affect our operations and financial performance. Our inability to manage such risks may adversely affect our operations and financial performance.

Anti-Money Laundering Laws and Regulations

We are subject to a variety of laws and regulations within Colombia and internationally that are designed to prevent money laundering and proceeds of crime through strict financial recordkeeping. In the event that any of our investments, or any proceeds thereof, any dividends or distributions therefrom, or any profits or revenues accruing from such investments are found to be in violation of money laundering legislation or otherwise, such transactions may be viewed as proceeds of crime under applicable legislation. Money laundering laws could restrict or otherwise jeopardize our ability to declare or pay dividends, effect other distributions or subsequently cause the repatriation of such funds to the United States or to any shareholders’ jurisdiction of residence. Furthermore, while we have no current intention to declare or pay dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future, in the event that a determination was made that the revenues from our cannabis operations could reasonably be shown to constitute proceeds of crime, we may decide or be required to suspend the declaration, and or, payment of dividends without advance notice and for an extended or indefinite period of time.

Foreign Trade Policies

Our international operations are subject to inherent risks, including changes in the regulations governing the flow of cannabis products between countries, fluctuations in cross-currency rates, discriminatory fiscal policies, unexpected changes in local regulations and laws and the uncertainty of enforcement of remedies in foreign jurisdictions. In addition, foreign jurisdictions could impose tariffs, quotas, trade barriers and other similar restrictions on our international sales and subsidize competing cannabis products. All of these risks could result in increased costs or a reduction in revenues. All of these risks could result in increased costs or decreased revenues.

United States Regulation

Although we do not believe that our limited U.S. activity will subject us to regulation under U.S. federal or state laws applicable to the sale of cannabis and marijuana products, we cannot assure you that current or future U.S. laws and regulations will not detrimentally affect our business. Local, state and federal cannabis laws and regulations in the United States are constantly changing and they are subject to evolving interpretations, which could require us to incur substantial costs associated with compliance or to alter one or more of our product or service offerings. In addition, violations of these laws, or allegations of such violations, could disrupt our business and result in a material adverse effect on our revenues, profitability, and financial condition. We cannot predict the nature of any future laws, regulations, interpretations or applications, nor can we determine what effect additional governmental regulations or administrative policies and procedures, when and if promulgated, could have on our business.

Liability, Enforcement, Complaints, etc.

Our participation in the cannabis and hemp industries may lead to litigation, formal or informal complaints, enforcement actions, and inquiries by third parties, other companies and/or various governmental authorities against us. Litigation, complaints, and enforcement actions involving us could consume considerable amounts of financial and other corporate resources, which could have an adverse effect on our future cash flows, earnings, results of operations and financial condition.

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Legal Proceedings

From time to time, we may be a party to legal and regulatory proceedings, including matters involving governmental agencies, entities with whom we transact business and other proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business. We will evaluate our exposure to these legal and regulatory proceedings and establish reserves for the estimated liabilities in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Assessing and predicting the outcome of these matters involves substantial uncertainties. Unexpected outcomes in these legal proceedings, or changes in management’s evaluations or predictions and accompanying changes in established reserves, could have an adverse impact on our financial results.

Environmental Regulations

We are subject to Colombian environmental laws governing the use of natural resources, which prohibit such use that causes harm to the interests of the community or of third parties. Parties that cause environmental damage while acting under the authority of a permit and, or license, are responsible for incurring the costs to rectify the damage. Parties that cause environmental damage while acting under the authority of a permit are responsible for incurring the costs to rectify the damage. The imposition of environmental sanctions in addition to civil and criminal penalties may be imposed. The imposition of environmental sanctions is in addition to civil and criminal penalties that may be imposed. Environmental damage caused while a party is acting without a license may lead to the imposition of sanctions, in addition to civil or criminal proceedings. Parties that cause environmental damage, in addition to sanctions or penalties that apply, are also required to carry out studies to assess the characteristics of the damage. Colombian environmental authorities may investigate potential claims, authorize preventative measures, or impose sanctions on parties breaching environmental law. Any such measures imposed on us could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Demand for Cannabis and Derivate Products

The global sale of cannabis and hemp products is a new industry as a result of recent legal and regulatory changes. Although we expect demand for licensed cannabis to exceed supply produced by licensed producers, there is a risk that such demand does not develop as anticipated. Although we expect the demand for licensed cannabis to be in excess of the supply being produced by the licensed producers, there is a risk that such demand does not develop as anticipated. Further, there is a risk that the adoption rate by pharmacies to sell medical cannabis is lower than expected or that such adoption rate may take longer than anticipated. There is also a risk that the international export market for medicinal cannabis and extracts, such as CBD, CBG and CBC, will not materialize as projected or not be commercially viable. Should any of such events materialize, the result may have a material adverse effect on our business, operations and financial condition. Should any of such events materialize, they may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Weather, Climate Change and Risks Inherent in an Agricultural Business

Our business involves growing and/or sourcing cannabis and related products, which is an agricultural product. Although our medical cannabis is intended to be grown in greenhouses, hemp used as feedstock for medicinal extracts and derivatives will be grown both outdoors and in greenhouses. The occurrence of severe adverse weather conditions, especially droughts, hail, floods or frost, is unpredictable and may have a potentially devastating impact on agricultural production and may otherwise adversely affect the supply of cannabis and hemp. Adverse weather conditions may be exacerbated by the effects of climate change and may result in the introduction and increased frequency of pests and diseases. The effects of severe adverse weather conditions may reduce our yields or require us to increase our level of investment to maintain yields. Additionally, higher than average temperatures and rainfall can contribute to an increased presence of insects and pests, which could negatively affect cannabis crops. Future droughts could reduce the yield and quality of our cannabis production, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The occurrence and effects of plant disease, insects and pests can be unpredictable and devastating to agriculture, potentially rendering all or a substantial portion of the affected harvests unsuitable for sale. Even if only a portion of the crop and, or, production is damaged, our results of operations could be adversely affected as all or a substantial portion of the production costs may have been incurred. Even when only a portion of the production is damaged, our results of operations could be adversely affected because all or a substantial portion of the production costs may have been incurred. Although some plant diseases are treatable, the cost of treatment can be high and such events could adversely affect our operating results and financial condition. Furthermore, if we fail to control a given plant disease and the production is threatened, we may be unable to supply our customers, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. There can be no assurance that natural elements will not have a material adverse effect on any such production.

Product Liability

As a manufacturer, distributor and/or seller of cannabis products designed to be ingested or inhaled by humans, we face an inherent risk of exposure to product liability claims, regulatory action and litigation if our products are alleged to have caused damages, loss or injury. In addition, the sale of our cannabis products involves the risk of injury to consumers due to tampering by unauthorized third parties or product contamination. In addition, the sale of our products involve the risk of injury to consumers due to tampering by unauthorized third parties or product contamination. Adverse reactions resulting from human consumption of our cannabis products alone or in combination with other medications or substances could occur. Adverse reactions resulting from human consumption of our products alone or in combination with other medications or substances could occur. We may be subject to various product liability claims, including, among others, that our products caused injury or illness, include inadequate instructions for use or include inadequate warnings concerning health risks, possible side effects or interactions with other substances. A product liability claim or regulatory action against us could result in increased costs, could adversely affect our reputation with our clients and consumers generally, and could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. There can be no assurances that we will be able to obtain or maintain product liability insurance on acceptable terms or with adequate coverage against potential liabilities. Such insurance is expensive and may not be available in the future on acceptable terms, or at all.

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Energy Prices and Supply

We may require substantial amounts of diesel and electric energy and other resources to harvest and transport cannabis and hemp. We rely upon third parties for our supply of energy resources used in our operations. The prices for and availability of energy resources may be subject to change or curtailment, respectively, due to, among other things, new laws or regulations, imposition of new taxes or tariffs, interruptions in production by suppliers, imposition of restrictions on energy supply by government, worldwide price levels and market conditions. If our energy supply is curtailed for an extended period of time and we are unable to find replacement sources at comparable prices, or at all, our business, financial condition and results of operations would be materially and adversely affected. If our energy supply is cut for an extended period of time and we are unable to find replacement sources at comparable prices, or at all, our business, financial condition and results of operations would be materially and adversely affected.

Retention and Acquisition of Skilled Personnel

We will be required to attract and retain top quality talent to compete in the marketplace. We believe our future growth and success will depend in part on our abilities to attract and retain highly skilled managerial, product development, sales and marketing, and finance personnel. There can be no assurance of success in attracting and retaining such personnel. Shortages in qualified personnel could limit our ability to be successful. At present and for the near future, we will depend upon a relatively small number of employees primarily in Colombia to develop, manufacture, market, sell and distribute our products. As the size of our business increases, we will seek to hire additional employees in other jurisdictions. Expansion of marketing and distribution of our products will require us to find, hire and retain additional capable employees who can understand, explain, market and sell our products and/or our ability to enter into satisfactory logistic arrangements to sell our products. There is intense competition for capable personnel in all of these areas and we may not be successful in attracting, training, integrating, motivating, or retaining new personnel or subcontractors for these required functions.

Emerging Market Risks

Emerging market investment generally poses a greater degree of risk than investment in more mature market economies as developing market economies are more susceptible to destabilization resulting from domestic and international developments.

Colombia’s legal and regulatory requirements in connection with companies conducting agricultural activities, banking system and controls as well as local business culture and practices are different from those in the United States. Our officers and directors must rely, to a great extent, on our local legal counsel and local consultants retained by us in order to keep abreast of material legal, regulatory and governmental developments as they pertain to and affect our business operations, and to assist us with our governmental relations. We also rely on the advice of local experts and professionals in connection with current and new regulations that develop in respect of banking, financing and tax matters. Any developments or changes in such legal, regulatory or governmental requirements or in local business practices are beyond our control and may adversely affect our business.

We also bear the risk that changes can occur to the Government in Colombia and a new government may void or change the laws and regulations that we are relying upon. Currently, there are no restrictions on the repatriation from Colombia of earnings to foreign entities and Colombia has never imposed such restrictions. However, there can be no assurance that restrictions on repatriation of earnings will not be imposed in the future. Exchange control regulations for Colombia require that any proceeds in foreign currency originated on exports of goods from Colombia be repatriated to Colombia. However, purchase of foreign currency is allowed through Colombian authorized financial entities for purposes of payments to foreign suppliers, repayment of foreign debt, payment of dividends to foreign stockholders and other foreign expenses.

Due to our location in Colombia, our business, financial position and results of operations may be affected by the general conditions of the Colombian economy, price instabilities, currency fluctuations, inflation, interest rates, regulatory changes, taxation changes, social instabilities, political unrest and other developments in or affecting Colombia, over which we do not have control.

Risks Related to Conducting Operations in Colombia

We were recently granted medicinal cannabis licenses in Colombia. Over the past 10 to 15 years, the Government of Colombia has made strides in improving the social, political, economic, legal and fiscal regimes. However, operations in Colombia remain subject to risk due to the potential for social, political, economic, legal and fiscal instability. However, operations in Colombia will still be subject to risk due to the potential for social, political, economic, legal and fiscal instability. The Government of Colombia faces ongoing problems including, but not limited to, unemployment and inequitable income distribution and unstable neighboring countries. The instability in neighboring countries could result in an influx of immigrants resulting in a humanitarian crisis and/or increased illegal activities. Colombia is also home to a number of insurgency groups and large swaths of the countryside are under guerrilla influence. In addition, Colombia experiences narcotics-related violence, a prevalence of kidnapping, extortion and thefts and civil unrest in certain areas of the country. Such instability may require us to suspend operations on our properties.

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Other risks exist relating to the conduct of business in Colombia. These risks include the future imposition of special taxes or similar charges, as well as foreign exchange fluctuations and currency convertibility and controls. Other risks of doing business in Colombia include our ability to enforce our contractual rights or the taking or nationalization of property without fair compensation, restrictions on the use of expatriates in our operations, renegotiation or nullification of existing concessions, licenses, permits and contracts, changes in taxation policies, or other matters.

The Government of Colombia recently reached a peace accord with the country’s largest guerrilla group. The Government of Colombia also entered into and dissolved formal discussions with the country’s second largest guerrilla group due to their unwillingness to cease criminal and violent crimes. There is no certainty that the agreements will be adhered to by all of the members of the guerrilla groups or that a peace agreement will be ultimately reached with the country’s second largest guerrilla group. There is a risk that any peace agreement might contain new laws or change existing laws that could have a material adverse effect on us. Furthermore, the achievement of peace with the country’s guerrilla groups could create additional social or political instability in the immediate aftermath, which could have a material adverse effect on our operations.

Global Economy

Financial and commodity markets in Colombia are influenced by the economic and market conditions in other countries, including other South American and emerging market countries and other global markets. Although economic conditions in these countries may differ significantly from economic conditions in Colombia, investors’ reactions to developments in these other countries, such as the recent developments in the global financial markets, may substantially affect the capital flows into, and the market value of securities of issuers with operations in Colombia.

Insurance Coverage

Our production is, in general, subject to different risks and hazards, including adverse weather conditions, fires, plant diseases and pest infestations, other natural phenomena, industrial accidents, labor disputes, changes in the legal and regulatory framework applicable to us, and environmental contingencies. We will endeavor to obtain appropriate insurance covering these risks in amounts sufficient to support a downturn in the sale of our products due to these potential production risks. The cost of such insurance may be high and we may not be able to obtain sufficient amount of insurance to cover these risks.

Operations in Spanish

As a result of our conducting most of our operations in Colombia, our regulatory licenses and books and records, including key documents such as material contracts and financial documentation, are principally negotiated and entered into in the Spanish language and English translations may not exist or be readily available.

General Business Risks

Inability to Manage Growth

We may not be able to effectively manage our growth as a producer, manufacturer and exporter of cannabis and hemp products. Our strategy envisions growing our business. We plan to expand our production and manufacturing capability and create a global distribution network. We plan to expand our production and manufacturing capability and create a distribution network on a global basis. Any growth in or expansion of our business is likely to continue to place a strain on our management and administrative resources, infrastructure and systems. As with other growing businesses, we expect that we will need to further refine and expand our business development capabilities, our systems and processes and our access to financing sources. We also will need to hire, train, supervise and manage new employees. These processes are time consuming and expensive, will increase management responsibilities and will divert management attention. We cannot assure you that we will be able to:

Our inability, or failure to effectively manage, our growth and expansion could harm our business and materially and adversely affect our operating results and financial condition.

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Speculative Forecasts

Any forecasts we provide will be highly speculative in nature and we cannot predict results in a development stage company with a high degree of accuracy. Any financial projections, especially those based on ventures with minimal operating history, are inherently subject to a high degree of uncertainty, and their ultimate achievement depends on the timing and occurrence of a complex series of future events, both internal and external to the enterprise. There can be no assurance that potential revenues or expenses we project will be accurate.

Limited Management Team

Our limited senior management team size may hamper our ability to effectively manage a publicly traded company while operating our business. Our management team has experience in the management of publicly traded companies and complying with federal securities laws, including compliance with recently adopted disclosure requirements on a timely basis. They realize it will take significant resources to meet these requirements while simultaneously working on cultivating, developing and distributing our cannabis and hemp related products. Our management will be required to design and implement appropriate programs and policies in responding to increased legal, regulatory compliance and reporting requirements, and any failure to do so could lead to the imposition of fines and penalties and harm our business.

Risks Related to our Common Stock

Limited Trading

Although prices for shares of our common stock are quoted on the OTCQB tier of the OTC Markets, there is limited trading and no assurance can be given that an active public trading market will develop or, if developed, that it will be sustained. The OTC Markets is generally regarded as a less efficient and less prestigious trading market than other national markets. There is no assurance if or when our common stock will be quoted on another more prestigious exchange or market. The market price of our common stock is may be volatile as there will likely be a limited trading market for the stock, which may cause transactions of small blocks of stock to have a disproportionate impact on the stock price. The market price of our common stock is likely to be highly volatile because for some time there will likely be a thin trading market for the stock, which causes trades of small blocks of stock to have a significant impact on the stock price.

We may issue additional stock without stockholder consent.

Our Board of Directors has authority, without action or vote of the stockholders, to issue all or part of our authorized but unissued shares. Additional shares may be issued in connection with future financing, acquisitions, employee stock plans, or otherwise. Any such issuance will dilute the percentage ownership of existing stockholders. The Board of Directors can also issue preferred stock in one or more series and fix the terms of such stock without stockholder approval. Preferred stock may include the right to vote as a series on particular matters, preferences as to dividends and liquidation, conversion and redemption rights and sinking fund provisions. The issuance of preferred stock could adversely affect the rights of the holders of common stock and reduce the value of the common stock. In addition, specific rights granted to holders of preferred stock could discourage, delay or prevent a transaction involving a change in control of our company, even if doing so would benefit our stockholders. Such issuance could also discourage proxy contests and make it more difficult for you and other stockholders to elect directors of your choosing and to cause us to take other corporate actions you desire.

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Broker-dealers may be discouraged from effecting transactions in our common stock because it is considered a penny stock and is subject to the penny stock rules.

Our common stock currently constitutes “penny stock.” Subject to certain exceptions, for the purposes relevant to us, “penny stock” includes any equity security that has a market price of less than $5.00 per share. Rules 15g-1 through 15g-9 promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, impose sales practice and disclosure requirements on certain brokers-dealers who engage in certain transactions involving a “penny stock.” In particular, a broker-dealer selling penny stock to anyone other than an established customer or “accredited investor” (generally, an individual with net worth in excess of $1,000,000 or an annual income exceeding $200,000, or $300,000 together with his or her spouse), must make a special suitability determination for the purchaser and must receive the purchaser’s written consent to the transaction prior to sale, unless the broker-dealer or the transaction is otherwise exempt. In addition, the penny stock regulations require the broker-dealer to deliver, prior to any transaction involving a penny stock, a disclosure schedule prepared by the Securities and Exchange Commission relating to the penny stock market, unless the broker-dealer or the transaction is otherwise exempt. In addition, the penny stock rules require that, prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from those rules, the broker-dealer must make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and receive the purchaser’s written agreement to the transaction. A broker-dealer is also required to disclose commissions payable to the broker-dealer and the registered representative and current quotations for the securities. Finally, a broker-dealer is required to send monthly statements disclosing recent price information with respect to the penny stock held in a customer’s account and information with respect to the limited market in penny stocks.

The additional sales practice and disclosure requirements imposed upon broker-dealers may discourage broker-dealers from effecting transactions in our shares, which could severely limit the market liquidity of the shares and impede the sale of our shares in the secondary market.

Because our Board of Directors does not intend to pay dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future, stockholders may have to sell their shares of our common stock to realize a return on their investment in the company.

Holders of our common stock are entitled to receive dividends if, and when, declared by our Board of Directors out of funds legally available. To date, we have paid no dividends. Our Board of Directors does not intend to declare any dividends in the foreseeable future, but instead intends to retain all earnings, if any, for use in our business operations. Accordingly, a return on an investment in shares of our common stock may be realized only through a sale of such shares, if at all.

Control of Common Stock will Influence Decision Making

Our officers, directors and principal stockholders are able to exert significant influence over us and may make decisions that are not in the best interests of all stockholders. Our officers, directors and principal stockholders (greater than 5% stockholders) collectively own approximately 87.0% of our fully-diluted common stock. As a result of such ownership, these stockholders are able to affect the outcome of, or exert significant influence over, all matters requiring stockholder approval, including the election and removal of directors and any change in control. In particular, this concentration of ownership of our common stock could have the effect of delaying or preventing a change of control of our company or otherwise discouraging or preventing a potential acquirer from attempting to obtain control of our company. This, in turn, could have a negative effect on the market price of our common stock. It could also prevent our stockholders from realizing a premium over the market prices for their shares of our common stock.

We are an Emerging Growth Company Within the Meaning of the Securities Act.

We are an “emerging growth company” within the meaning of the Securities Act, as modified by the JOBS Act, and we may take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies including, but not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements, and exemptions from the requirements of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and stockholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. As a result, our stockholders may not have access to certain information they may deem important. We could be an emerging growth company for up to five years, although circumstances could cause us to lose that status earlier, including if the market value of our common stock held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the end of any second quarter of a fiscal year, in which case we would no longer be an emerging growth company as of the end of such fiscal year. We cannot predict whether investors will find our securities less attractive because we will rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our securities less attractive as a result of our reliance on these exemptions, the trading prices of our securities may be lower than they otherwise would be, there may be a less active trading market for our securities and the trading prices of our securities may be more volatile.

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Further, Section 102(b)(1) of the JOBS Act exempts emerging growth companies from being required to comply with new or revised financial accounting standards until private companies (that is, those that have not had a Securities Act registration statement declared effective or do not have a class of securities registered under the Exchange Act) are required to comply with the new or revised financial accounting standards. The JOBS Act provides that a company can elect to opt out of the extended transition period and comply with the requirements that apply to non-emerging growth companies but any such election to opt out is irrevocable. We have elected not to opt out of such extended transition period which means that when a standard is issued or revised and it has different application dates for public or private companies, we, as an emerging growth company, can adopt the new or revised standard at the time private companies adopt the new or revised standard. This may make comparison of our financial statements with another public company which is neither an emerging growth company nor an emerging growth company which has opted out of using the extended transition period difficult or impossible because of the potential differences in accountant standards used.

Antitakeover Protections

Anti-takeover provisions may limit the ability of another party to acquire us, which could cause our stock price to decline. Our articles of incorporation, as amended, bylaws and Nevada law contain provisions that could discourage, delay or prevent a third party from acquiring us, even if doing so may be beneficial to our stockholders. In addition, these provisions could limit the price investors would be willing to pay in the future for shares of our common stock.

Increased Compliance Costs

The requirements of being a public company, including compliance with the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and the requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, may strain our resources, increase our costs and distract management, and we may be unable to comply with these requirements in a timely or cost-effective manner. As a public company, we need to comply with laws, regulations and requirements, certain corporate governance provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, related regulations of the SEC, and requirements of the principal trading market upon which our common stock may trade, with which we are not required to comply as a private company. As a result, the combined business will incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses that a private company would not incur. Complying with these statutes, regulations and requirements will occupy a significant amount of the time of our board of directors and management, will require us to have additional finance and accounting staff, may make it more difficult to attract and retain qualified officers and members of our board of directors, particularly to serve on the audit committee, and may make some activities more difficult, time consuming and costly. We will need to: