Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - HAE

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Item 1A. Risk Factors in this report.

Our ability to achieve our long-term strategic and financial-improvement goals;

Demand for and market acceptance risks for new and existing products, including material reductions in purchasing from or loss of a significant customer;

Our ability to develop, manufacture and market new products and technologies successfully and in a timely manner and the ability of our competitors and other third parties to develop products or technologies that render our products or technologies noncompetitive or obsolete;

Product quality or safety concerns, leading to product recalls, withdrawals, regulatory action by the FDA (or similar non-U.S. regulatory agencies), reputational damage, declining sales or litigation;

Security breaches of our information technology systems or our products, which could impair our ability to conduct business or compromise sensitive information of the Company or its customers, suppliers and other business partners, or of customers’ patients;

The potential that the expected strategic benefits and opportunities from completed or planned acquisitions, including the Company’s acquisitions of OpSens Inc. and Attune Medical, divestitures or other strategic investments by the Company may not be realized or may take longer to realize than expected;

Pricing pressures resulting from trends toward healthcare cost containment, including the continued consolidation among healthcare providers and other market participants;

Disruptions to the continuity, availability and pricing of plastic and other raw materials, finished goods and components used in the manufacturing of our products (including those purchased from sole-source suppliers) and the related continuity of our manufacturing, sterilization, supply chain and distribution operations, including disruptions caused by natural disasters, extreme weather and other conditions caused by or related to climate change, labor strikes, terrorism acts, cyber incidents or other adverse events;

Our ability to obtain the anticipated benefits of restructuring programs that we have or may undertake, including the Operational Excellence Program and portfolio rationalization initiatives;

The impact of enhanced requirements to obtain regulatory approval in the U.S. and around the world and the associated timing and cost of product approval;

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Our ability to comply with established and developing U.S. and foreign legal and regulatory requirements, including FCPA, EU MDR/EU IVDR and similar laws in other jurisdictions, as well as U.S. and foreign export and import restrictions and tariffs;

The impact of changes in U.S. and international tax laws;

Our ability to meet our debt obligations and raise additional capital when desired on terms reasonably acceptable to us;

The potential impact of our convertible senior notes and related capped call transactions;

Geopolitical and economic conditions in China, Taiwan, Russia, Ukraine, the Middle East and other foreign jurisdictions where we do business;

Our ability to execute and realize anticipated benefits from our investments in emerging economies;

The potential effect of foreign currency fluctuations and interest rate fluctuations on our net sales, expenses and resulting margins;

Our ability to protect intellectual property and the outcome of patent litigation;

Costs and risks associated with product liability and other litigation claims we may be subject to now or in the future;

Our ability to retain and attract key personnel;

Market conditions impacting our stock price and/or our share repurchase program, and the possibility that such share repurchase program may be delayed, suspended or discontinued;

Our ability to achieve against our corporate responsibility initiatives and meet evolving stakeholder expectations concerning corporate responsibility matters; and

The impact of actual or threatened public health crises.

Investors should understand that it is not possible to predict or identify all such factors and should not consider the risks described above and in Item 1A. Risk Factors to be a complete statement of all potential risks and uncertainties. The Company does not undertake to publicly update any forward-looking statement that may be made from time to time, whether as a result of new information or future events or developments.
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ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

In addition to the other information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and the exhibits hereto, the following risk factors should be considered carefully in evaluating our business. Our business, financial condition, cash flows or results of operations could be materially adversely affected by any of these risks. This section contains forward-looking statements. Please refer to the cautionary statements made under the heading “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Information” at the end of Item 1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for more information on the qualifications and limitations on forward-looking statements.

Risks Related to our Business and Industry

If our business strategy does not yield the expected results or we fail to implement the necessary changes to our operations, we could see material adverse effects on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

We view our operations and manage our business in three principal reporting segments: Plasma, Blood Center and Hospital. We believe that Plasma and Hospital have growth potential, while Blood Center competes in challenging markets that require us to manage the business differently, including reducing costs, shrinking the scope of the current product line and evaluating opportunities to exit unfavorable customer contracts. If we have not correctly identified the product categories with greatest growth potential, we will not allocate our resources appropriately which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Material reductions in purchasing from or loss of a significant customer could adversely affect our business.

In fiscal 2024, our ten largest customers accounted for approximately 48% of our net revenues. As previously disclosed, our largest Plasma customer, CSL, informed us in April 2021 of its intent not to renew its supply agreement for the use of PCS2 plasma collection system devices and the purchase of disposable plasmapheresis kits in the U.S. following the expiration of the then current term of its contract, which was subsequently extended on a non-exclusive basis through December 2025. Any non-renewal, termination, material reduction in purchasing or material reduction in per unit pricing by any of our largest customers for any reason, including material decreases in demand for plasma or development of alternative processes, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results or operations.

We face intense competition, and if we are unable to successfully expand our product lines through internal research and new product development or keep pace with rapid technological changes in the healthcare industry, our business may be materially and adversely affected.

A significant element of our strategy is to increase revenue growth by focusing on innovation and new product development. The medical device markets in which we participate, however, are highly competitive. We encounter significant competition across our product lines and in each market in which our products are sold from various medical device companies, some of whom have greater financial and marketing resources than we do. In addition, the medical device markets in which we participate and healthcare industry generally are characterized by extensive research and development and rapid technological change.

New product development requires significant investment in research and development, clinical trials and regulatory approvals. The results of our product development efforts may be affected by a number of factors, including our ability to anticipate customer needs, innovate and develop new products and technologies, effectively use artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning capabilities, successfully complete clinical trials, obtain regulatory approvals in the United States and abroad, manufacture products in a cost-effective manner, obtain appropriate intellectual property protection for our products, and gain and maintain market acceptance of our products. The results of our product development efforts may be affected by a number of factors, including our ability to anticipate customer needs, innovate and develop new products and technologies, successfully complete clinical trials, obtain regulatory approvals in the United States and abroad, manufacture products in a cost-effective manner, obtain appropriate intellectual property protection for our products, and gain and maintain market acceptance of our products. In addition, patents attained by others could preclude or delay our commercialization of a product. There can be no assurance that any products now in development or that we may seek to develop in the future will achieve technological feasibility, obtain regulatory approval or gain market acceptance. If we fail to develop new products or enhance existing products, or if competitive technologies or therapeutic alternatives to plasma-derived pharmaceuticals in development, such as FcRn-targeted therapies, emerge and gain market acceptance, such events could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. In addition, a delay in the timing of the launch of next-generation products and the overall performance of, and continued customer confidence in, those products may result in declines in our market share and have an adverse impact on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

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Defects or quality issues associated with our products could adversely affect the results of operations.

Quality is extremely important to us and our customers due to the serious and costly consequences of product failure. Manufacturing or design defects, component failures, unapproved or improper use of our products, or inadequate disclosure of risks or other information relating to the use of our products can lead to injury or other serious adverse events. These events could lead to recalls or safety alerts relating to our products (either voluntary or as required by the FDA or similar governmental authorities in other countries), and could result, in certain cases, in the removal of a product from the market. A recall could result in significant costs and lost sales and customers, enforcement actions and/or investigations by state and federal governments or other enforcement bodies, as well as negative publicity and damage to our reputation that could reduce future demand for our products. Personal injuries relating to the use of our products can also result in significant product liability claims being brought against us. In some circumstances, such adverse events could also cause delays in regulatory approval of new products or the imposition of post-market approval requirements.

We are increasingly dependent on information technology systems and subject to privacy and security laws and a cyber-attack or other breach of these systems could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

We increasingly rely on information technology systems, including cloud-based computing, to process, transmit and store electronic information for our day-to-day operations and for our customers, including sensitive personal information and proprietary or confidential information. Additionally, certain of our products collect data regarding patients and donors and connect to our systems for maintenance and other purposes or are actively managed by Haemonetics on behalf of specific customers. Similar to other large multi-national companies, the size and complexity of our information technology systems makes them vulnerable to a cyber-attack, malicious intrusion, breakdown, destruction, loss of data privacy, or other significant disruption. We also outsource certain elements of our information technology systems to third parties that, as a result of this outsourcing, could have access to certain confidential information and whose systems may also be vulnerable to these types of attacks or disruptions. While we conduct security risk assessments prior to engaging third party suppliers and other vendors and business partners to validate that they maintain appropriate safeguards to protect our and their information systems in connection with the services they provide, it is possible that they suffer a cyber-attack that impacts us. Security threats, including cyber and other attacks are becoming increasingly sophisticated, frequent, and adaptive and, like other large multi-national companies, we have experienced cyber incidents in the past and may experience them in the future. Accordingly, our information systems require an ongoing commitment of significant resources to maintain, protect and enhance existing systems and develop new systems to keep pace with continuing changes in information processing technology, evolving systems and regulatory standards, the increasing need to protect patient and customer information and changing customer patterns. Based on the information available as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, we are not aware of any risks from cybersecurity threats, including as a result of any previous cybersecurity incidents, that have materially affected or are reasonably likely to materially affect us, including our business strategy, results of operation or financial condition. If our operations are found to be in violation of any of these laws or any other governmental regulations that may apply to us, we may be subject to significant civil, criminal and administrative penalties, damages, fines, exclusion from government funded healthcare programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, and the curtailment or restructuring of our operations. While we have invested and continue to invest in the protection of personal information and proprietary or confidential information, there can be no assurance that our efforts will prevent cyber-attacks, intrusions, breakdowns or other incidents or ensure compliance with all applicable securities and privacy laws, regulations, standard standards. In addition, third parties may attempt to hack into our products to obtain data relating to patients with our products or our proprietary information. Emerging technologies such as generative AI may be used by malicious actors to create more targeted phishing narratives or otherwise strengthen social engineering capabilities, which may increase our threat landscape. Any failure by us or third parties we work with to maintain or protect our respective information technology systems and data integrity, including from cyber-attacks, intrusions or other breaches, could result in the unauthorized access to patient data and personally identifiable information, theft of intellectual property or other misappropriation of assets, or otherwise compromise our confidential or proprietary information and disrupt our operations. Any of these events, in turn, may cause us to lose existing customers, have difficulty preventing, detecting and controlling fraud, have disputes with customers, physicians and other healthcare professionals, be subject to legal claims and liability, have regulatory sanctions or penalties imposed, have increases in operating expenses, incur expenses or lose revenues as a result of a data privacy breach or theft of intellectual property, or suffer other adverse consequences, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Additionally, the legal and regulatory environment surrounding information security and privacy is increasingly demanding, with the imposition of new and changing requirements across businesses, including rules requiring timely public disclosure of cybersecurity incidents.Additionally, the legal and regulatory environment surrounding information security and privacy is increasingly demanding, with the imposition of new and changing requirements across businesses. We are required to comply with increasingly complex and changing legal and regulatory requirements that govern the collection, use, storage, security, transfer, disclosure and other processing of personal data in the United States and in other countries, including, but not limited to, HIPAA, HITECH, the California Consumer Privacy Act, or CCPA, the California Privacy Rights Act, and the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR. The GDPR imposes stringent EU data protection requirements and provides for significant penalties for noncompliance. HIPAA also imposes stringent data
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privacy and security requirements and the regulatory authority has imposed significant fines and penalties on organizations found to be out of compliance. CCPA provides consumers with a private right of action against companies who have a security breach due to lack of appropriate security measures, and several other U.S. states have introduced or proposed similar privacy laws which may apply to us directly or indirectly through our customers, manufacturers, suppliers or other third-party partners. In addition, new information security and privacy laws have also come into effect in China and other countries where we conduct business. We or our third-party providers and business partners may also be subjected to audits or investigations by one or more domestic or foreign government agencies relating to compliance with information security and privacy laws and regulations, and noncompliance with the laws and regulations could results in material fines or litigation. We or our third-party providers and business partners may also be subjected to audits or investigations by one or more domestic or foreign government agencies relating to compliance 18Table of Contentswith information security and privacy laws and regulations, and noncompliance with the laws and regulations could results in material fines or litigation.

If our business development activities are unsuccessful, we may not realize the intended benefits.

We have sought and in the future may seek to supplement our organic growth through strategic acquisitions, investments and alliances, including our recent acquisitions of OpSens Inc.We have sought and in the future may seek to supplement our organic growth through strategic acquisitions, investments and alliances. and Attune Medical. We have also sought and in the future may seek to divest certain assets deemed non-core to our long-term strategic objectives. Such transactions are inherently risky and require significant effort and management attention. The success of any acquisition, investment or alliance, or of any divestiture, may be affected by a number of factors, including our ability to properly assess and value the potential business opportunity or to successfully integrate any business we may acquire into our existing business.

Promising partnerships and acquisitions may also not be completed for reasons such as competition among prospective partners or buyers, the inability to reach satisfactory terms, the need for regulatory approvals or the existence of economic conditions affecting our access to capital for acquisitions and other capital investments. If we are successful in completing partnerships and acquisitions, we may be required to expend significant funds, incur additional debt or other obligations, or issue additional securities, which may negatively affect our operating results and financial condition. If we spend significant funds or incur additional debt or obligations, our ability to obtain financing for working capital or other purposes could be adversely affected, and we may be more vulnerable to economic downturns and competitive pressures. In connection with our recent acquisitions of OpSens Inc. and Attune Medical, we incurred approximately $230.0 million in debt under our senior unsecured revolving credit facility that, after giving effect to our entry into a second amended and restated credit agreement in April 2024, reduces the available borrowing amount under our senior unsecured revolving credit facility to $520.0 million and must be repaid by April 2029.

If our business development activities are unsuccessful, we may not realize the intended benefits of such activities, including that acquisition and integration costs may be greater than expected or the possibility that expected return on investment synergies and accretion, or on new growth opportunities funded in whole or part by divestitures, will not be realized or will not be realized within the expected timeframe.

We outsource certain aspects of our business to a single third-party vendor that subjects us to risks, including disruptions in business and increased costs.

Currently, we rely on a single vendor to support several of our business processes, including customer service and support and elements of enterprise technology, procurement, accounting and human resources. We make diligent efforts to ensure that the provider of these outsourced services is observing proper internal control practices. However, there are no guarantees that failures will not occur. Accordingly, we are subject to the risks associated with the vendor’s ability to successfully provide the necessary services to meet our needs.

If our vendor is unable to adequately protect our data or information is lost, if our ability to deliver our services is interrupted (including as a result of significant outbreaks of disease, natural disasters, extreme weather and other conditions caused by or related to climate change, strikes, terrorism attacks, cyber incidents or other adverse events in the countries in which the vendor operates), if our vendor's fees are higher than expected, if our vendor makes mistakes in the execution of operations support, or if the vendor terminates our relationship, then our business and operating results may be negatively affected.If our vendor is unable to adequately protect our data or information is lost, if our ability to deliver our services is interrupted (including as a result of significant outbreaks of disease, natural disasters, extreme weather and other conditions caused by or related to climate change, strikes, terrorism attacks or other adverse events in the countries in which the vendor operates), if our vendor's fees are higher than expected, if our vendor makes mistakes in the execution of operations support, or if the vendor terminates our relationship, then our business and operating results may be negatively affected.

A significant portion of our revenue derives from the sale of blood collection supplies. Declines in the number of blood collection procedures have adversely impacted our business and future declines may have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The demand for whole blood disposable products in the U.S. continues to decrease due to sustained declines in transfusion rates caused by hospitals’ improved blood management techniques and protocols. In response to this trend, U.S. blood center collection groups are primarily focused on obtaining the lowest average selling prices for their whole blood collection products. We expect to see continued declines in transfusion rates and the market to remain price-focused and highly competitive for the
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foreseeable future. Continued declines in this market could have a material adverse effect on our liquidity and results of operations.

Consolidation of healthcare providers and blood collectors, healthcare cost containment pressures, government payment and delivery system reforms and changes in private payer policies could decrease demand for our products, the prices which customers are willing to pay for those products and/or the number of procedures performed using our devices, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Political, economic and policy influences are causing the healthcare and blood collection industries to make substantial structural and financial changes that affect our results of operations. Government and private sector initiatives limiting the growth of healthcare costs are causing structural reforms in healthcare delivery, including the reduction in blood use and reduced payments for care. These trends have placed greater pricing pressure on suppliers and, in some cases, decreased average selling prices and increased the number of sole source relationships. This pressure impacts our Hospital and Blood Center businesses. Our vascular closure devices, for example, are often perceived as physician preference devices with a relatively higher price point compared to certain vascular closure alternatives such as sutures or manual compression, and purchases are commonly made by a hospital only after approval by its value analysis committee. Our Vascular Closure devices, for example, are often perceived as physician preference devices with a relatively higher price point compared to certain vascular closure alternatives such as sutures or manual compression, and purchases are commonly made by a hospital only after approval by its value analysis committee. If a hospital value analysis committee does not approve or revokes prior approval for any of the reasons set forth above, the demand for our vascular closure devices may decrease and we could experience an adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition. Additionally, while Hospital capital purchase patterns have increased from initially depressed levels during the COVID-19 pandemic, it is difficult to predict the long-term impact of the pandemic on hospital spending patterns. Additionally, while Hospital capital purchase patterns have increased from initially depressed levels earlier in the COVID-19 pandemic, it is difficult to predict the long-term impact of the pandemic on hospital spending patterns.

The influence of integrated delivery networks, group purchasing organizations and large single accounts has the potential to put price pressure on our Hospital business. It also puts price pressure on our U.S. Blood Center customers who are also facing reduced demand for red cells. Our Blood Center customers have responded to this pressure by creating their own group purchasing organizations and resorting to single source tenders to create incentives for suppliers, including us, to significantly reduce prices.

We expect that market demand, government regulation, third-party reimbursement policies, government contracting requirements and societal pressures will continue to change the worldwide healthcare industry, resulting in further business consolidations and alliances among our customers and competitors. This may exert further downward pressure on the prices of our products and adversely impact our business, financial condition or results of operations.

An interruption in our ability to manufacture our products, obtain key components or raw materials, or the failure of a sole source supplier or sterilization service provider may adversely affect our business.19Table of ContentsAn interruption in our ability to manufacture our products, obtain key components or raw materials, or the failure of a sole source supplier or sterilization service provider may adversely affect our business.

We have a complex global supply chain that involves integrating key suppliers and our manufacturing capacity into a global movement of components and finished goods.

We manufacture certain key disposables and devices at single locations with limited alternate facilities. If natural disasters, extreme weather and other conditions caused by or related to climate change, strikes, terrorism attacks or other adverse events occur that result in the closure of or damage to one or more of these facilities, we may be unable to supply the relevant products at previous levels or at all for some period. Additionally, for reasons of quality assurance or cost effectiveness, we purchase certain finished goods, components and raw materials from sole suppliers who have their own complex supply chains. We have experienced increased levels of unpredictability in the supply of certain raw materials and components, including semiconductor chips, used in the manufacturing of our products. While we continue to believe we will have access to the raw materials and components that we need, any disruption to one or more of our suppliers’ production or delivery of sufficient volumes of raw materials and components conforming to our specifications could disrupt or delay our ability to deliver finished products to our customers. For example, we purchase components in Asia for use in manufacturing in the U.S. and Mexico. We source all of our apheresis equipment from Asia and regularly ship finished goods from the U.S. and Mexico to the rest of the world.

Many of our products also require sterilization prior to sale or distribution and we utilize a mix of internal resources and contract sterilizers to perform this service. To the extent we or our contract sterilizers are unable to sterilize our products, whether due to capacity, availability of materials for sterilization, regulatory or other constraints, including federal and state regulations on the use of ethylene oxide, we may be unable to transition to alternative internal or external resources or methods in a timely or cost effective manner, or at all, which could have a material impact on our results of operations and financial condition.

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In addition, we manufacture our vascular closure devices under a shelter plan service agreement with Offshore International Incorporated (d/b/a Tetakawi) pursuant to which we lease our manufacturing facility in Guaymas, Mexico. Tetakawi is responsible for a number of ongoing services related to the facility, including provision of external security and maintenance, manufacturing personnel related human resource matters, recruiting support, government compliance, workforce transportation and cross-border shipping of raw components. We are reliant on Tetakawi to provide these services and any disruption in these services or our failure to maintain our contractual relationship with Tetakawi could significantly harm our ability to manufacture our vascular closure devices and maintain sufficient quality standards, which would negatively impact our business and results of operations.

Due to the high standards and stringent requirements of the FDA and other similar non-U.S. regulatory agencies applicable to manufacturing our products, such as the FDA’s QSR and cGMP regulations, we also may not be able to quickly establish additional or replacement sources for certain raw materials, components or finished goods. A reduction or interruption in manufacturing, or an inability to secure alternative sources of raw materials, components or finished goods on commercially reasonable terms or in a timely manner, could compromise our ability to manufacture our products on a timely and cost-competitive basis, which may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Changes in the cost, composition or availability of the plastics and resins we purchase, or of other raw materials and components used in our products, could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We face risks related to the price, composition and availability of plastic raw materials used in our disposable products, which represent a substantial portion of our revenues. Material or sustained increases in the price of petroleum or petroleum derivatives could have an adverse impact on the costs to procure plastic raw materials. Additionally, our results of operations could be negatively impacted by volatility in the cost or availability of these and other raw materials and components used in our products that, in turn, increase the costs of producing and distributing our products. In recent years, we have experienced inflationary pressures that have significantly increased the cost of raw materials, transportation, construction, services and energy necessary for the production and distribution of our products. Continued uncertainty around inflationary pressures, rising interest rates and macroeconomic conditions have increased the risk of creating new, or exacerbating existing, economic challenges we face. While we have implemented cost containment measures, selective price increases and taken other actions to offset these inflationary pressures in our global supply chain, we may not be able to completely offset all the increases in our operational costs. Additionally, climate change (including laws or regulations passed in response thereto) could increase our supply costs, including energy and transportation/freight-related expenses, or reduce the availability of raw materials.

The composition of the plastic we purchase is also important. Due to regulatory changes and evolving customer expectations, we may be required to remove materials such as phthalates or PFAS from our devices, find alternative materials which then need to be validated or obtain regulatory approvals from the regulatory authorities for a number of products. Due to regulatory changes and evolving customer expectations, we may be required to remove materials such as phthalates from our devices, find alternative materials which then need to be validated or obtain regulatory approvals from the regulatory authorities for a number of products.

While we have not experienced significant shortages in the past, any interruption in the supply for certain plastics could have a material impact on our business by limiting our ability to manufacture and sell the products that represent a significant portion of our revenues. These outcomes may in turn result in customers transitioning to available competitive products, loss of market share, negative publicity, reputational damage, loss of customer confidence or other negative consequences (including a decline in stock price).

We may not realize the benefits we expect from our Operational Excellence Program.

In July 2019, our Board of Directors approved the Operational Excellence Program, also referred to in this report as the 2020 Program, and delegated authority to management to determine the detail of the initiatives that will comprise the program. While cost savings from the 2020 Program to date have been consistent with our expectations, it is possible that events and circumstances, such as rising interest rates, macroeconomic uncertainty and the related impacts on us, our customers and suppliers could result in our not realizing all of the anticipated benefits or our not realizing the anticipated benefits on our expected timetable. Additionally, any material reduction in purchases by significant customers and any actions we take in response to such anticipated reduction could result in a decrease in benefits we realize under the 2020 Program. Our inability to realize all of the anticipated benefits from the 2020 Program could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, cash flows and financial condition.
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Risks Related to Government Regulation

As a medical device and drug manufacturer, we operate in a highly regulated industry, and non-compliance with applicable laws or regulations could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

The manufacture, distribution and marketing of our products are subject to extensive regulation by the FDA and other state and non-U.S. regulatory bodies. Our operations are also subject to review and monitoring by the FDA and other regulatory authorities. Government regulation of medical devices is meant to assure their safety and effectiveness, and includes regulation of, among other things, the product’s development, testing, premarket clearance, de novo classification or approval, manufacture, marketing, labeling, post-market surveillance, reporting, and imports and exports. Government regulation of medical devices is meant to assure their safety and effectiveness, and includes regulation of, among other things, the product’s development, testing, premarket clearance and approval, manufacture, marketing, labeling, post-market surveillance, reporting, and imports and exports. Before a new medical device, or a new use of an existing product can be marketed in the United States, it must first receive either premarket clearance under Section 510(k) of the U.S. Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, or FDCA, a grant of a request for de novo classification or a Premarket Approval, or PMA, from the FDA, unless an exemption applies. Similarly, before a new drug can be marketed in the U.S., it must first receive approval of a new drug application or abbreviated new drug application under the FDCA. The process of obtaining regulatory authorization to market a medical device or a drug can be costly and time-consuming, and we may not be able to obtain these authorizations on a timely basis, if at all. The process of obtaining regulatory clearances or approvals to market a medical device can be costly and time-consuming, and we may not be able to obtain these clearances or approvals on a timely basis, if at all.

Many of our currently commercialized products have received 510(k) clearance. In the future, the FDA may determine that our products will require more costly, lengthy and uncertain de novo classification or PMA processes. Modifications to Class III devices, like our vascular closure products, may require additional clinical studies or supplemental PMA submissions. If the FDA requires us to go through a lengthier, more rigorous process for future products or modifications to existing products, our product introductions or modifications could be delayed or canceled, which could adversely affect our revenue. In particular, the FDA has recently placed increased scrutiny on cybersecurity for medical devices, which may necessitate additional time and cost for product development, submission and approval, de novo classification or clearance. In particular, the FDA has recently placed increased scrutiny on cybersecurity for medical devices which may necessitate additional time and cost for product development, submission and approval or clearance. In addition, even if we do obtain clearance, de novo classification or approval, the FDA may not authorize these products for the indications that we requested. In addition, even if we do obtain clearance or approval, the FDA may not approve or clear these products for the indications that we requested. Any delay in, or failure to receive or maintain, clearances, de novo classifications or approvals for our products under development could prevent us from generating revenue from these products. Any delay in, or failure to receive or maintain, clearances or approvals for our products under development could prevent us from generating revenue from these products.

Failure to substantially comply with applicable regulations could subject our products to recall or seizure of our products by government authorities, or an order to suspend manufacturing and distribution activities. If our products were determined to have design or manufacturing flaws, this could also result in their recall or seizure. Either of these situations could also result in administrative actions like untitled or warning letters or in the imposition of fines and other penalties or sanctions. Either of these situations could also result in the imposition of fines, administrative actions like untitled or warning letters, and other penalties or sanctions.

Our products are also subject to approval and regulation by foreign regulatory and safety agencies. For example, the EU has adopted the EU Medical Device Regulation, or EU MDR, and the EU In Vitro Diagnostic Regulation, or EU IVDR, each of which impose stricter requirements for the marketing and sale of medical devices beyond those of the current medical device directives they replace, including in the area of clinical evaluation requirements, quality systems and post-market surveillance. For example, the EU has adopted the EU Medical Device Regulation, or EU MDR, and EU In Vitro Diagnostic Regulation, or EU IVDR, each of which impose stricter requirements for the marketing and sale of medical devices beyond those of the current medical device directives they replace, including in the area of clinical evaluation requirements, quality systems and post-market surveillance. Complying with the requirements of these regulations may require us to incur significant expenditures and we may experience delays that negatively impact the ability to sell our full suite of products in certain jurisdictions. Similarly, the separation of states from participation in the EU, such as through the cessation of the UK’s membership in the EU (commonly known as “Brexit”) and the separation of the Swiss and EU medical product markets with the adoption of the EU MDR (commonly referred to as “Swexit”), may result in further regulatory risk and complexity as the former EU member or participant state establishes separate laws and regulations governing medical products. More stringent regulations have also been introduced in many countries outside of Europe that previously did not have medical device regulations, had minimal regulations or relied on reciprocal recognition of approval in other markets. Failure to meet these requirements could adversely impact our business in the EU and other applicable regions.

If we or our suppliers fail to comply with laws and regulations governing the manufacture and production of our products, our products could be subject to restrictions or withdrawal from the market.

Any product for which we obtain clearance, de novo classification or approval, and the manufacturing processes, reporting requirements, post-approval clinical data and promotional activities for such product, will be subject to continued regulatory review and oversight, and our facilities will be subject to periodic inspection (both routine and unannounced) by the FDA and other domestic and foreign regulatory bodies.Any product for which we obtain clearance or approval, and the manufacturing processes, reporting requirements, post-approval clinical data and promotional activities for such product, will be subject to continued regulatory review, oversight and periodic inspection (both routine and unannounced) by the FDA and other domestic and foreign regulatory bodies. In particular, we and our third-party suppliers must comply with the FDA’s QSR or cGMP requirements (depending on the products at issue), which address, among other things, the methods of documentation of the design, testing, production, control, quality assurance, labeling, packaging, sterilization, storage and shipping of our products.

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Any future failure by us or one of our suppliers to comply with applicable statutes and regulations administered by the FDA or other regulatory authority could result in administrative actions, field actions, or civil or criminal enforcement actions.

Furthermore, our key component suppliers may not currently be or may not continue to be in compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements, which could result in our failure to produce our products on a timely basis and in the required quantities, if at all. Any sanctions by the FDA or other regulatory authority could have a material adverse effect on our reputation, business, results of operations and financial condition.

We are also subject to environmental laws, which are becoming more stringent throughout the world. For example, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulates the use of ethylene oxide for sterilization of medical devices, and is increasingly focused on reducing emissions from the ethylene oxide sterilization process, which could increase our costs of operations and necessitate changes to our manufacturing plants and processes. Other environmental laws may have similar consequences to us or our suppliers, or result in liability to us. Additionally, increased environmental regulation, including the enactment of laws and regulations to address climate change, may increase our compliance costs or restrict certain aspects of our activities.

As a medical device and drug manufacturer, we are subject to safety reporting requirements.

Under the FDA’s medical device reporting regulations, medical device manufacturers are required to report to the FDA information of which they become aware that a device has or may have caused or contributed to a death or serious injury or malfunctioned in a way that would likely cause or contribute to a death or serious injury if the malfunction of the device or one of our similar devices were to recur. In addition, drug manufacturers are required to report adverse drug experiences associated with the use of a drug and submit field alert reports for instances of contamination, change or deterioration of the distributed product or failure to meet specifications. Similar reporting requirements exist in some of the other jurisdictions in which we operate. Failure to report these events to the FDA or other applicable regulatory authorities within the required timeframes, or at all, could lead to enforcement actions, fines and criminal sanctions against us.

Our relationships with customers and third-party payers are subject to applicable anti-kickback, fraud and abuse, transparency and other healthcare laws and regulations, which could expose us to criminal sanctions, civil penalties, exclusion, contractual damages, reputational harm and diminished profits and future earnings.

We are subject to fraud and abuse and other healthcare laws and regulations that constrain the business or financial arrangements and relationships through which we market, sell and distribute our products. In addition, we are subject to transparency laws and patient privacy regulation by U.S. federal and state governments and by governments in foreign jurisdictions in which we conduct our business.

The shifting commercial compliance environment and the need to build and maintain robust and expandable systems to comply with different compliance or reporting requirements in multiple jurisdictions increase the possibility that a healthcare or pharmaceutical company may fail to comply fully with one or more of these requirements. Efforts to ensure that our business arrangements with third parties will comply with applicable healthcare laws and regulations may involve substantial costs. It is possible that governmental authorities will conclude that our business practices do not comply with applicable fraud and abuse or other healthcare laws and regulations or guidance, or anti-bribery laws such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977, or equivalent laws in other jurisdictions. If our operations are found to be in violation of any of these laws or any other governmental regulations that may apply to us, we may be subject to significant civil, criminal and administrative penalties, damages, fines, exclusion from government funded healthcare programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, and the curtailment or restructuring of our operations. If any of the physicians or other providers or entities with whom we expect to do business are found not to be in compliance with applicable laws, they may be subject to criminal, civil or administrative sanctions, including exclusions from government funded healthcare programs. Even if we are not determined to have violated these laws, government investigations into these issues typically require the expenditure of significant resources and generate negative publicity, which could harm our financial condition and divert resources and the attention of our management from operating our business.

Changes in tax laws or exposure to additional income tax liabilities could have a material impact on our financial condition, results of operations and/or liquidity.

We are subject to income taxes, non-income based taxes and tax audits in the U.S. and various foreign jurisdictions. Tax authorities may disagree with certain positions we have taken and assess additional taxes. We regularly assess the likely outcomes of these audits in order to determine the appropriateness of our tax provision and have established contingency reserves for material, known tax exposures. However, the calculation of such tax exposures involves the application of complex
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tax laws and regulations in many jurisdictions, as well as interpretations as to the legality under various rules in certain jurisdictions. Therefore, there can be no assurance that we will accurately predict the outcomes of these disputes or other tax audits or that issues raised by tax authorities will be resolved at a financial cost that does not exceed our related reserves and the actual outcomes of these disputes and other tax audits could have a material impact on our results of operations or financial condition.

The tax regimes we are subject to or operate under are unsettled and may be subject to significant change. Changes in applicable tax laws and regulations, or their interpretation and application, including the possibility of retroactive effect, could affect our income tax expense and profitability, as they did in fiscal 2017 and fiscal 2018 upon passage of the U.S. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, and in 2020 with the passage of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act. Certain provisions of the Inflation Reduction Act passed in 2022, including a 15% corporate alternative minimum tax, as well as the similar 15% global minimum tax under the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's Pillar Two Global Anti-Base Erosion Rules, may impact our income tax expense, profitability, and capital allocation decisions. The Pillar Two Global Anti-Base Erosion Rules will be effective for fiscal 2025. We are still evaluating the impact of Pillar Two on the effective tax rate.

As we expand the scale of our international business activities, any changes in the U.S. or foreign taxation of such activities may increase our worldwide effective tax rate and harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. Such changes may also apply retroactively to our historical operations and result in taxes greater than the amounts estimated and recorded in our financial statements.

Risks Related to our Financial Obligations and Indebtedness

We have a significant amount of debt that may decrease our business flexibility, access to capital, and/or increase our borrowing costs, and we may still incur additional debt in the future, which may adversely affect our operations and financial results.

In April 2024, subsequent to the fiscal year ended March 30, 2024, the Company entered into a second amended and restated credit agreement with certain lenders to refinance the existing senior unsecured term loan and senior unsecured revolving credit facility and extend their maturity date through April 2029. The second amended and restated credit agreement provides for a $250.0 million senior unsecured term loan and a $750.0 million senior unsecured revolving credit facility (together, the “2024 Revised Credit Facilities”). As of April 30, 2024, in addition to our $500.0 million aggregate principal amount of indebtedness under our convertible senior notes due 2026 (the “2026 Notes”), the Company had $250.0 million of debt outstanding under the senior unsecured term loan and $230.0 million outstanding under the senior unsecured revolving credit facility. As of April 1, 2023, in addition to our $500.0 million aggregate principal amount of indebtedness under our convertible senior notes due 2026 (the “2026 Notes”), the Company had $274.7 million of debt outstanding under the term loan and no borrowings were outstanding under the revolving credit facility.

Our 2024 Revised Credit Facilities contain financial covenants that require us to maintain specified financial ratios that may limit our ability to borrow additional funds and that require us to make interest and principal payments.Our Revised Credit Facilities contain financial covenants that require us to maintain specified financial ratios that may limit our ability to borrow additional funds and that require us to make interest and principal payments. As of April 30, 2024, we were in compliance with the covenants pursuant to our 2024 Revised Credit Facilities, and we currently forecast that we will be in compliance with these covenants through the period ending March 29, 2025.

The conditional conversion feature of the 2026 Notes, if triggered, may adversely affect our financial condition and operating results.

Under certain circumstances, the noteholders may convert their 2026 Notes at their option prior to the scheduled maturities. If one or more noteholders elect to convert their 2026 Notes, we would be required to settle a portion or all of our conversion obligation through the payment of cash, which could adversely affect our liquidity. In addition, holders of our 2026 Notes will have the right to require us to repurchase their 2026 Notes upon the occurrence of a fundamental change (as defined in the indenture, dated as of March 5, 2021, between U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee (the “Trustee”) and us (the “Indenture”)), at a repurchase price equal to the principal amount of the 2026 Notes to be repurchased, plus accrued and unpaid special interest, if any, to but not including, the fundamental change repurchase date. We may not have enough available cash or be able to obtain financing at the time we are required to repurchase the 2026 Notes or pay the cash amounts due upon conversion. In addition, applicable law, regulatory authorities and the agreements governing our other indebtedness may restrict our ability to repurchase the 2026 Notes or pay the cash amounts due upon conversion. Our failure to repurchase the 2026 Notes or to pay the cash amounts due upon conversion when required will constitute a default under the Indenture. A default under the Indenture or the fundamental change itself could also lead to a default under agreements governing our other indebtedness, including our 2024 Revised Credit Facilities, which may result in that other indebtedness becoming immediately payable in full. We may not have sufficient funds to satisfy all amounts due under the other indebtedness and the Notes.

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Even if holders do not elect to convert their 2026 Notes, we could be required under applicable accounting rules to reclassify all or a portion of the outstanding principal of the 2026 Notes as a current rather than long-term liability, which would result in a material reduction of our net working capital.

The Capped Call Transactions may affect the value of the 2026 Notes and our common stock.

In connection with the 2026 Notes issuance, we entered into privately negotiated capped call transactions (the “Capped Call Transactions”) with certain financial institutions (the “Option Counterparties”). The Capped Call Transactions are expected generally to reduce the potential dilution to our common stock upon any conversion of the 2026 Notes and/or offset any potential cash payments we are required to make in excess of the principal amount of converted Notes, as the case may be, with such reduction and/or offset subject to a cap.

From time to time, the Option Counterparties and/or their respective affiliates may modify their hedge positions by entering into or unwinding various derivatives with respect to our common stock and/or purchasing or selling our common stock or other securities of ours in secondary market transactions prior to the maturity of the 2026 Notes. This activity could also cause or avoid an increase or a decrease in the market price of our common stock or the 2026 Notes.

We are subject to counterparty risk with respect to the Capped Call Transactions.

The Option Counterparties are financial institutions, and we are subject to the risk that one or more of the Option Counterparties may default or otherwise fail to perform, or may exercise certain rights to terminate, their obligations under the Capped Call Transactions. Our exposure to the credit risk of the option counterparties is not secured by any collateral. Past global economic conditions have from time to time resulted in the actual or perceived failure or financial difficulties of many financial institutions. If an Option Counterparty becomes subject to insolvency proceedings, we will become an unsecured creditor in those proceedings with a claim equal to our exposure at the time under such transactions with such Option Counterparty. Our exposure depends on many factors, but our exposure will generally increase if the market price or the volatility of our common stock increases. In addition, upon default by an Option Counterparty, we may suffer more dilution than we currently anticipate with respect to our common stock. We can provide no assurances as to the financial stability or viability of the Option Counterparties.

In addition, the Capped Call Transactions are complex, and they may not operate as planned. For example, the terms of the Capped Call Transactions may be subject to adjustment, modification or, in some cases, renegotiation if certain corporate or other transactions occur. Accordingly, these transactions may not operate as we intend if we are required to adjust their terms as a result of transactions in the future or upon unanticipated developments that may adversely affect the functioning of the Capped Call Transactions.

Provisions in the Indenture could delay or prevent an otherwise beneficial takeover of us.

Certain provisions in the 2026 Notes and the Indenture could make a third party attempt to acquire us more difficult or expensive. For example, if a takeover constitutes a fundamental change, then noteholders will have the right to require us to repurchase their 2026 Notes for cash. In addition, if a takeover constitutes a make-whole fundamental change, then we may be required to temporarily increase the conversion rate. In either case, and in other cases, our obligations under the 2026 Notes and the Indenture could increase the cost of acquiring us or otherwise discourage a third party from acquiring us or removing incumbent management, including in a transaction that noteholders or holders of our common stock may view as favorable.

Conversion of the 2026 Notes may dilute the ownership interest of existing stockholders.

The conversion of some or all of the Notes will dilute the ownership interests of existing stockholders to the extent we deliver shares of our common stock upon conversion of any of the 2026 Notes. Any sales in the public market of the common stock issuable upon such conversion could adversely affect our common stock’s prevailing market prices. In addition, the existence of the 2026 Notes may encourage short selling by market participants because the conversion of the 2026 Notes could be used to satisfy short positions, or anticipated conversion of the 2026 Notes into shares of our common stock could depress the price of our common stock.

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Risks Related to Operating Internationally

As a substantial amount of our revenue comes from outside the U.S., we are subject to geopolitical events, economic volatility, violations of anti-corruption laws, export and import restrictions and tariffs, decisions by local regulatory authorities and the laws and medical practices in foreign jurisdictions.

We do business in over 90 countries and have distributors in approximately 80 of these countries. This exposes us to currency fluctuation, geopolitical risk, economic volatility, anti-corruption laws, export and import restrictions, local regulatory authorities and the laws and medical practices in foreign jurisdictions.

U.S. legislation aimed at boosting competitiveness of U.S. businesses may have unintended effects on our business. Tariffs and other protectionist measures directed at China and other markets, as well as prolonged uncertainty regarding such measures as administrations change, may have adverse effects on our ability to source, manufacture and distribute products