Quiver Quantitative

Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - GBRG

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$GBRG Risk Factor changes from 00/09/01/21/2021 to 00/09/30/22/2022

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS Our ordinary shares subject to redemption are classified for as outside permanent equity and the changes in classification could have a material effect on our financial results. In addition, in preparation of the Company’s financial statements as of and for the year ended June 30, 2021, the Company concluded it should restate its financial statements to classify all ordinary shares subject to possible redemption in temporary equity. In accordance with the SEC and its staff’s guidance on redeemable equity instruments, ASC Topic 480, Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity (ASC 480), paragraph 10-S99, redemption provisions not solely within the control of the Company require ordinary shares subject to redemption to be classified outside of permanent equity. The Company had previously classified a portion of its ordinary shares in permanent equity. Although the Company did not specify a maximum redemption threshold, its charter provides that currently, the Company will not redeem its public shares in an amount that would cause its net tangible assets to be less than $5,000,001. The Company considered that the threshold would not change the nature of the underlying shares as redeemable and thus would be required to be disclosed outside equity. As a result, the Company revised its previously filed financial statements to classify all ordinary shares as temporary equity and to recognize accretion from the initial book value to redemption value at the time of its Initial Public Offering and in accordance with ASC 480. The change in the carrying value of redeemable shares of ordinary shares resulted in charges against accumulated deficit. We have identified a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting as of June 30, 2022. If we are unable to develop and maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results in a timely manner, which may adversely affect investor confidence in us and materially and adversely affect our business and operating results. Following the issuance of the SEC Statement, our management and our audit committee concluded that, in light of the SEC Statement, it was appropriate to restate our previously issued audited financial statements as of and for the year ended June 30, 2021. See “—the changes on classification of permanent equity could have a material effect on our financial results.” As part of such process, we identified a material weakness in our internal controls over financial reporting. Specifically, the Company’s management has concluded that control around the interpretation and accounting for certain complex financial instruments was not effectively designed or maintained as they relate to the accounting for warrants and ordinary shares subject to possible redemption. A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented, or detected and corrected on a timely basis. Effective internal controls are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and prevent fraud. We continue to evaluate steps to remediate the material weakness. These remediation measures may be time consuming and costly and there is no assurance that these initiatives will ultimately have the intended effects. Trading in our securities may be prohibited under the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act if the PCAOB determines that it cannot inspect or fully investigate our auditor. In that case, Nasdaq could delist our securities. The delisting of our securities, or the threat of their being delisted, may materially and adversely affect the value of your investment. Additionally, the inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections may deprive our investors with the benefits of such inspections. The Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act, or the HFCAA, was enacted on December 18, 2020. The HFCAA states if the SEC determines that we have filed audit reports issued by a registered public accounting firm that has not been subject to inspection by the PCAOB for three consecutive years beginning in 2021, the SEC shall prohibit our shares or other securities from being traded on a national securities exchange or in the over the counter trading market in the U.S.. 27 Our current auditor, the independent registered public accounting firm that issues the audit report included elsewhere in this annual report, as an auditor of companies that are traded publicly in the United States and a firm registered with the PCAOB, is subject to laws in the United States pursuant to which the PCAOB conducts regular inspections to assess its compliance with the applicable professional standards. However, if it is later determined that the PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate completely our auditor because of a position taken by an authority in a foreign jurisdiction, Nasdaq could delist our securities, including our units, ordinary shares and redeemable warrants, and the SEC shall prohibit them from being traded on a national securities exchange or in the over the counter trading market in the U.S. For example, if we effect our initial business combination with a business located in the PRC or Hong Kong and if our new auditor is located in China or Hong Kong, with operations in and who performs audit operations of registrants in China or Hong Kong, a jurisdiction where the PCAOB has been unable to conduct inspections without the approval of the relevant authorities, the work of our new auditor as it relates to those operations may not be inspected by the PCAOB. If our securities are delisted and prohibited from being traded on a national securities exchange or in the over the counter trading market in the U.S. due to the PCAOB not being able to conduct inspections or full investigations of our auditor, it would substantially impair your ability to sell or purchase our securities when you wish to do so, and the risk and uncertainty associated with potential delisting and prohibition could have a negative impact on the price of our securities. Also, such delisting and prohibition could significantly affect the Company’s ability to raise capital on acceptable terms, or at all, which could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition and prospects. In May 2013, the PCAOB announced that it had entered into a Memorandum of Understanding on Enforcement Cooperation with the CSRC and the PRC Ministry of Finance, which establishes a cooperative framework between the parties for the production and exchange of audit documents relevant to investigations undertaken by the PCAOB in the PRC or by the CSRC or the PRC Ministry of Finance in the United States. The PCAOB continues to be in discussions with the CSRC and the PRC Ministry of Finance to permit joint inspections in the PRC of audit firms that are registered with the PCAOB and audit Chinese companies that trade on U.S. exchanges. On March 24, 2021, the SEC adopted interim final rules relating to the implementation of certain disclosure and documentation requirements of the HFCAA. We will be required to comply with these rules if the SEC identifies us as having a “non-inspection” year under a process to be subsequently established by the SEC. On June 22, 2021, the U.S. Senate passed a bill which, if passed by the U.S. House of Representatives and signed into law, would reduce the number of consecutive non-inspection years required for triggering the prohibitions under the HFCAA from three years to two. On November 5, 2021, the SEC approved the PCAOB’s Rule 6100, Board Determinations Under the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act. Rule 6100 provides a framework for the PCAOB to use when determining, as contemplated under the HFCAA, whether it is unable to inspect or investigate completely registered public accounting firms located in a foreign jurisdiction because of a position taken by one or more authorities in that jurisdiction. On December 2, 2021, the SEC issued amendments to finalize rules implementing the submission and disclosure requirements in the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act. The rules apply to registrants that the SEC identifies as having filed an annual report with an audit report issued by a registered public accounting firm that is located in a foreign jurisdiction and that PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate completely because of a position taken by an authority in foreign jurisdictions. On August 26, 2022, the PCAOB entered into a Statement of Protocol with the China Securities Regulatory Commission and the Ministry of Finance of the PRC and, as summarized in the “Statement on Agreement Governing Inspections and Investigations of Audit Firms Based in China and Hong Kong” published on the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s official website, the parties agreed to the following: (i) in accordance with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the PCAOB shall have independent discretion to select any issuer audits for inspection or investigation; (ii) the PCAOB shall have direct access to interview or take testimony from all personnel of the audit firms whose issuer engagements are being inspected or investigated; (iii) the PCAOB shall have the unfettered ability to transfer information to the SEC, in accordance with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act; and (iv) the PCAOB inspectors shall have access to complete audit work papers without any redactions, with view-only procedures for certain targeted pieces of information such as personally identifiable information. The PCAOB is required to reassess its determinations as to whether it is able to carry out inspection and investigation completely and without obstruction by the end of 2022. 28 The SEC may propose additional rules or guidance that could impact us if our auditor is not subject to PCAOB inspection. For example, on August 6, 2020, the President’s Working Group on Financial Markets, or the PWG, issued the Report on Protecting United States Investors from Significant Risks from Chinese Companies to the then President of the United States. This report recommended the SEC implement five recommendations to address companies from jurisdictions that do not provide the PCAOB with sufficient access to fulfill its statutory mandate. Some of the concepts of these recommendations were implemented with the enactment of the HFCAA. However, some of the recommendations were more stringent than the HFCAA. For example, if a company was not subject to PCAOB inspection, the report recommended that the transition period before a company would be delisted would end on January 1, 2022. The SEC has announced that the SEC staff is preparing a consolidated proposal for the rules regarding the implementation of the HFCAA and to address the recommendations in the PWG report. It is unclear when the SEC will complete its rulemaking and when such rules will become effective and what, if any, of the PWG recommendations will be adopted. The SEC has also announced amendments to various annual report forms to accommodate the certification and disclosure requirements of the HFCAA. There could be additional regulatory or legislative requirements or guidance that could impact us if our auditor is not subject to PCAOB inspection. The implications of these possible regulations in addition to the requirements of the HFCAA are uncertain, and such uncertainty could cause the market price of our securities to be materially and adversely affected. If, for whatever reason, the PCAOB is unable to conduct inspections or full investigations of our auditor, the Company could be delisted or prohibited from being traded over the counter earlier than would be required by the HFCAA. If our securities are unable to be listed on another securities exchange by then, such delisting and prohibition would substantially impair your ability to sell or purchase our securities when you wish to do so, and the risk and uncertainty associated with potential delisting and prohibition could have a negative impact on the price of our securities. Also, such delisting and prohibition could significantly affect the Company’s ability to raise capital on acceptable terms, or at all, which would have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition and prospects. Inspections of audit firms that the PCAOB has conducted have identified deficiencies in those firms’ audit procedures and quality control procedures, which may be addressed as part of the inspection process to improve future audit quality. If the PCAOB were unable to conduct inspections or full investigations of the Company’s auditor, investors in our securities would be deprived of the benefits of such PCAOB inspections. In addition, the inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections or full investigations of auditors would may make it more difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm’s audit procedures or quality control procedures as compared to auditors that are subject to the PCAOB inspections, which could cause investors and potential investors in our stock to lose confidence in the audit procedures of our auditor and reported financial information and the quality of our financial statements. 29 U. . S. laws and regulations, including the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act and Accelerating Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act, may restrict or eliminate our ability to complete a business combination with certain companies, particularly those acquisition candidates with substantial operations in China or Hong Kong. The PCAOB is currently unable to conduct inspections on accounting firms in the PRC and Hong Kong without the approval of the relevant government authorities. The auditor and its audit work in the PRC or Hong Kong may not be inspected fully by the PCAOB. Inspections of other auditors conducted by the PCAOB outside China have at times identified deficiencies in those auditors’ audit procedures and quality control procedures, which may be addressed as part of the inspection process to improve future audit quality. The lack of PCAOB inspections of audit work undertaken in China or Hong Kong prevents the PCAOB from regularly evaluating the PRC or Hong Kong auditor’s audits and its quality control procedures. As a result, shareholders may be deprived of the benefits of PCAOB inspections if we complete a business combination with such companies. Future developments in U.S. laws may restrict our ability or willingness to complete certain business combinations with companies. For instance, the recently enacted Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act (the “HFCAA”) would restrict our ability to consummate a business combination with a target business unless that business met certain standards of the PCAOB and would require delisting of a company from U.S. national securities exchanges if the PCAOB is unable to inspect its public accounting firm for three consecutive years. The HFCAA also requires public companies to disclose, among other things, whether they are owned or controlled by a foreign government, specifically, those based in China. We may not be able to consummate a business combination with a favored target business due to these laws. Furthermore, on June 22, 2021, the U.S. Senate passed the Accelerating Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act (“AHFCAA”), which, if signed into law, would amend the HFCAA and require the SEC to prohibit an issuer’s securities from trading on any U.S. stock exchanges if its auditor is not subject to PCAOB inspections for two consecutive years instead of three consecutive years. On December 2, 2021, the SEC issued amendments to finalize rules implementing the submission and disclosure requirements in the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act. The rules apply to registrants that the SEC identifies as having filed an annual report with an audit report issued by a registered public accounting firm that is located in a foreign jurisdiction and that PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate completely because of a position taken by an authority in foreign jurisdictions. The documentation we may be required to submit to the SEC proving certain beneficial ownership requirements and establishing that we are not owned or controlled by a foreign government in the event that we use a foreign public accounting firm not subject to inspection by the PCAOB or where the PCAOB is unable to completely inspect or investigate our accounting practices or financial statements because of a position taken by an authority in the foreign jurisdiction could be onerous and time consuming to prepare. HFCAA mandates the SEC to identify issuers of SEC-registered securities whose audited financial reports are prepared by an accounting firm that the PCAOB is unable to inspect due to restrictions imposed by an authority in the foreign jurisdiction where the audits are performed. If such identified issuer’s auditor cannot be inspected by the PCAOB for three consecutive years, the trading of such issuer’s securities on any U.S. national securities exchanges, as well as any over-the-counter trading in the U.S., will be prohibited. On March 24, 2021, the SEC adopted interim final rules relating to the implementation of certain disclosure and documentation requirements of the HFCAA. An identified issuer will be required to comply with these rules if the SEC identifies it as having a “non-inspection” year under a process to be subsequently established by the SEC. On November 5, 2021, the SEC approved the PCAOB’s Rule 6100, Board Determinations Under the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act. Rule 6100 provides a framework for the PCAOB to use when determining, as contemplated under the HFCAA, whether it is unable to inspect or investigate completely registered public accounting firms located in a foreign jurisdiction because of a position taken by one or more authorities in that jurisdiction. On December 16, 2021, the PCAOB issued a Determination Report which found that the PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate completely registered public accounting firms headquartered in: (i) China, and (ii) Hong Kong. Our auditor, Friedman LLP, headquartered in Manhattan, New York with no branches or offices outside the United States, is an independent registered public accounting firm registered with the PCAOB and is subject to laws in the United States pursuant to which the PCAOB conducts regular inspections to assess Friedman LLP’s compliance with applicable professional standards. The PCAOB currently has access to inspecting the working papers of our auditor. Our auditor is not headquartered in China or Hong Kong and was not identified in this report as a firm subject to the PCAOB’s determination. 30 On August 26, 2022, the PCAOB entered into a Statement of Protocol with the China Securities Regulatory Commission and the Ministry of Finance of the PRC and, as summarized in the “Statement on Agreement Governing Inspections and Investigations of Audit Firms Based in China and Hong Kong” published on the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s official website, the parties agreed to the following: (i) in accordance with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the PCAOB shall have independent discretion to select any issuer audits for inspection or investigation; (ii) the PCAOB shall have direct access to interview or take testimony from all personnel of the audit firms whose issuer engagements are being inspected or investigated; (iii) the PCAOB shall have the unfettered ability to transfer information to the SEC, in accordance with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act; and (iv) the PCAOB inspectors shall have access to complete audit work papers without any redactions, with view-only procedures for certain targeted pieces of information such as personally identifiable information. The PCAOB is required to reassess its determinations as to whether it is able to carry out inspection and investigation completely and without obstruction by the end of 2022. In the event that we complete a business combination with a company with substantial operations in China or Hong Kong and PCAOB is not able to fully conduct inspections of our auditor’s work papers in China or Hong Kong, it could cause us to fail to be in compliance with U.S. securities laws and regulations, we could cease to be listed on a U.S. securities exchange, and U.S. trading of our shares could be prohibited under the HFCAA. Any of these actions, or uncertainties in the market about the possibility of such actions, could adversely affect our prospects to successfully complete a business combination with a China or Hong Kong-based company, our access to the U.S. capital markets and the price of our shares. Future developments in respect of increase U.S. regulatory access to audit information are uncertain, as the legislative developments are subject to the legislative process and the regulatory developments are subject to the rule-making process and other administrative procedures. Other developments in U.S. laws and regulatory environment, including but not limited to executive orders such as Executive Order (E.O.) 13959, “Addressing the Threat from Securities Investments That Finance Communist Chinese Military Companies,” may further restrict our ability to complete a business combination with certain China-based businesses. We may not be able to complete an initial business combination with a U.S. target company since such initial business combination may be subject to U.S. foreign investment regulations and review by a U.S. government entity such as the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), or ultimately prohibited. Cross Wealth Investment Holding Limited, our sponsor, a British Virgin Islands company, which is controlled by our director, Jining Li, a Hong Kong national. Our sponsor owns approximately 6.22% of our outstanding shares as of the date of this annual report. Certain federally licensed businesses in the United States, such as broadcasters and airlines, may be subject to rules or regulations that limit foreign ownership. In addition, CFIUS is an interagency committee authorized to review certain transactions involving foreign investment in the United States by foreign persons in order to determine the effect of such transactions on the national security of the United States. Because we may be considered a “foreign person” under such rules and regulations, any proposed business combination between us and a U.S. business engaged in a regulated industry or which may affect national security, we could be subject to such foreign ownership restrictions and/or CFIUS review. The scope of CFIUS was expanded by the Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernization Act of 2018 (“FIRRMA”) to include certain non-passive, non-controlling investments in sensitive U.S. businesses and certain acquisitions of real estate even with no underlying U.S. business. FIRRMA, and subsequent implementing regulations that are now in force, also subject certain categories of investments to mandatory filings. If our potential initial business combination with a U.S. business falls within the scope of foreign ownership restrictions, we may be unable to consummate a business combination with such business. In addition, if our potential business combination falls within CFIUS’s jurisdiction, we may be required to make a mandatory filing or determine to submit a voluntary notice to CFIUS, or to proceed with the initial business combination without notifying CFIUS and risk CFIUS intervention, before or after closing the initial business combination. CFIUS may decide to block or delay our initial business combination, impose conditions to mitigate national security concerns with respect to such initial business combination or order us to divest all or a portion of a U.S. business of the combined company if we had proceeded without first obtaining CFIUS clearance. The foreign ownership limitations, and the potential impact of CFIUS, may limit the attractiveness of a transaction with us or prevent us from pursuing certain initial business combination opportunities that we believe would otherwise be beneficial to us and our shareholders. A s a result, the pool of potential targets with which we could complete an initial business combination may be limited and we may be adversely affected in terms of competing with other special purpose acquisition companies which do not have similar foreign ownership issues. 31 Moreover, the process of government review, whether by CFIUS or otherwise, could be lengthy. Because we have only a limited time to complete our initial business combination (12 months from the consummation of our IPO, or up to 21 months, if we extend the time to complete a business combination as described in the prospectus dated March 1, 2021 relating to our IPO) our failure to obtain any required approvals within the requisite time period may require us to liquidate. If we liquidate, our public shareholders may only receive $10.22 per share initially, and our warrants and rights will expire worthless. This will also cause you to lose any potential investment opportunity in a target company and the chance of realizing future gains on your investment through any price appreciation in the combined company. Risks Related to Doing Business in Jurisdictions We Operate All our operations are through our office space located in Hong Kong. However, due to the long arm provisions under the current PRC laws and regulations, the Chinese government may exercise significant oversight and discretion over the conduct of our business and may intervene in or influence our operations at any time, which could result in a material change in our operations and/or the value of our ordinary shares. Changes in the policies, regulations, rules, and the enforcement of laws of the Chinese government may also be quick with little advance notice and our assertions and beliefs of the risk imposed by the PRC legal and regulatory system cannot be certain. Goldenbridge is a holding company with no material operations of its own and we conduct our operation through our office located in Hong Kong. As of the date of this annual report, we are not materially affected by recent statements by the Chinese Government indicating an extent to exert more oversight and control over offerings that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers. However, due to long arm provisions under the current PRC laws and regulations, there remains regulatory uncertainty with respect to the implementation and interpretation of laws in China. The PRC government may choose to exercise significant oversight and discretion, and the policies, regulations, rules, and the enforcement of laws of the Chinese government to which we are subject may change rapidly and with little advance notice to us or our shareholders. As a result, the application, interpretation, and enforcement of new and existing laws and regulations in the PRC and our assertions and beliefs of the risk imposed by the PRC legal and regulatory system are often uncertain. In addition, these laws and regulations may be interpreted and applied inconsistently by different agencies or authorities, and inconsistently with our current policies and practices. New laws, regulations, and other government directives in the PRC may also be costly to comply with, and such compliance or any associated inquiries or investigations or any other government actions may: ● delay or impede our development; ● result in negative publicity or increase our operating costs; ● require significant management time and attention; and ● subject us to remedies, administrative penalties and even criminal liabilities that may harm our business, including fines assessed for our current or historical operations, or demands or orders that we modify or even cease our business practices. We are aware that recently, the PRC government initiated a series of regulatory actions and statements to regulate business operations in certain areas in China with little advance notice, including cracking down on illegal activities in the securities market, enhancing supervision over China-based companies listed overseas using variable interest entity structure, adopting new measures to extend the scope of cybersecurity reviews, and expanding the efforts in anti-monopoly enforcement. Since these statements and regulatory actions are new, it is highly uncertain how soon legislative or administrative regulation making bodies will respond and what existing or new laws or regulations or detailed implementations and interpretations will be modified or promulgated, if any, and the potential impact such modified or new laws and regulations will have on our daily business operation, the ability to accept foreign investments and list on an U.S. or other foreign exchange. Chinese government may intervene or influence our operations at any time or may exert more control over offerings conducted overseas and foreign investment in China-based issuers, which may result in a material change in our operations and/or the value of our ordinary shares. The promulgation of new laws or regulations, or the new interpretation of existing laws and regulations, in each case that restrict or otherwise unfavorably impact the ability or way we conduct our business and could require us to change certain aspects of our business to ensure compliance, which could increase costs, require us to obtain licenses, permits, approvals or certificates, or subject us to additional liabilities. To the extent any new or more stringent measures are required to be implemented, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected as well as materially decrease the value of our ordinary shares, potentially rendering it worthless. 32 If the Chinese government chooses to exert more oversight and control over offerings that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers, such action may significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer ordinary shares to investors and cause the value of our ordinary shares to significantly decline or be worthless. Recent statements by the Chinese government have indicated an intent to exert more oversight and control over offerings that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investments in China-based issuers. On July 6, 2021, the General Office of the Communist Party of China Central Committee and the General Office of the State Council jointly issued a document to crack down on illegal activities in the securities market and promote the high-quality development of the capital market, which, among other things, requires the relevant governmental authorities to strengthen cross-border oversight of law-enforcement and judicial cooperation, to enhance supervision over China-based companies listed overseas, and to establish and improve the system of extraterritorial application of the PRC securities laws. On December 24, 2021, the CSRC published the Provisions of the State Council on the Administration of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies (the “Administration Provisions”), and the Administrative Measures for the Filing of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies (the “Measures”), which are now open for public comment. Furthermore, on July 10, 2021, the CAC issued a revised draft of the Measures for Cybersecurity Review for public comments, which required that, among others, in addition to “operator of critical information infrastructure”, any “data processor” controlling personal information of no less than one million users which seeks to list in a foreign stock exchange should also be subject to cybersecurity review, and further elaborated the factors to be considered when assessing the national security risks of the relevant activities. On December 28, 2021, the CAC, the National Development and Reform Commission (“NDRC”), and several other administrations jointly issued the revised Measures for Cybersecurity Review, or the “Revised Review Measures”, which became effective and replaced the existing Measures for Cybersecurity Review on February 15, 2022. According to the Revised Review Measures, if an “online platform operator” that is in possession of personal data of more than one million users intends to list in a foreign country, it must apply for a cybersecurity review. Based on a set of Q&A published on the official website of the State Cipher Code Administration in connection with the issuance of the Revised Review Measures, an official of the said administration indicated that an online platform operator should apply for a cybersecurity review prior to the submission of its listing application with non-PRC securities regulators. Moreover, the CAC released the draft of the Regulations on Network Data Security Management in November 2021 for public consultation, which among other things, stipulates that a data processor listed overseas must conduct an annual data security review by itself or by engaging a data security service provider and submit the annual data security review report for a given year to the municipal cybersecurity department before January 31 of the following year. Given the recency of the issuance of the Revised Review Measures and their pending effectiveness, there is a general lack of guidance and substantial uncertainties exist with respect to their interpretation and implementation. We do not currently expect the Revised Review Measures to have an impact on our business, operations or our offering as we do not believe that Goldenbridge is deemed to be an “operator of critical information infrastructure” or a “data processor” controlling personal information of no less than one million users, that are required to file for cybersecurity review before listing in the U.S., because (i) Goldenbridge is incorporated in the BVI and operating through an office located in Hong Kong and the Revised Review Measures remains unclear whether it shall be applied to a BVI holding company operating through an office located in Hong Kong; (ii) Goldenbridge operates without any subsidiary or VIE structure in mainland China; (iii) as of date of this annual report, Goldenbridge has not collected and stored any personal information of PRC individuals; and (vi) as of the date of this annual report, Goldenbridge has not been informed by any PRC governmental authority of any requirement that it files for a cybersecurity review. However, there remains significant uncertainty in the interpretation and enforcement of relevant PRC cybersecurity laws and regulations. If Goldenbridge is deemed to be an “operator of critical information infrastructure” or a “data processor” controlling personal information of no less than one million users, Goldenbridge’s operation and the listing of our ordinary shares in the U.S. could be subject to CAC’s cybersecurity review in the future. Based on our understanding of the current PRC laws, as of the date of this annual report, Goldenbridge is not required to obtain any permission or approval from PRC authorities to obtain any licenses or approvals for offering securities to foreign investors and while seeking a target for the initial business combination, or to operate and to issue our securities to foreign investors and to list on a US exchange, including the CSRC or the CAC, because (i) the CSRC currently has not issued any definitive rule or interpretation concerning whether offerings like ours are subject to this regulation; and (ii) Goldenbridge was established in the BVI and operates through an office space located in Hong Kong and is not included in the categories of industries and companies whose foreign securities offerings are subject to review by the CSRC or the CAC. 33 Uncertainties still exist, due to the possibility that laws, regulations, or policies in the PRC could change rapidly in the future. In the event that (i) the PRC government expanded the categories of industries and companies whose foreign securities offerings are subject to review by the CSRC or the CAC that we are required to obtain such permissions or approvals; or (ii) we inadvertently concluded that relevant permissions or approvals were not required or that we did not receive or maintain relevant permissions or approvals required, any action taken by the PRC government could significantly limit or completely hinder our operations in PRC and our ability and to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and could cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless. The Hong Kong legal system embodies uncertainties which could limit the legal protections available to the Company. Hong Kong is a Special Administrative Region of the PRC and enjoys a high degree of autonomy under the “one country, two systems” principle. The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region’s constitutional document, the Basic Law, ensures that the current political situation will remain in effect for 50 years. Hong Kong has enjoyed the freedom to function in a high degree of autonomy for its affairs, including currencies, immigration and custom, independent judiciary system and parliamentary system. However, we are not in any position to guarantee the implementation of the “one country, two systems” principle and the level of autonomy as currently in place at the moment. Any changes in the state of political environment in Hong Kong may materially and adversely affect our business and operation. A downturn in the Hong Kong, China or global economy, and economic and political policies of China could materially and adversely affect our business and financial condition. Our business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations may be influenced to a significant degree by political, economic and social conditions in Hong Kong and China generally and by continued economic growth in Hong Kong and China as a whole. The Chinese economy differs from the economies of most developed countries in many respects, including the amount of government involvement, level of development, growth rate, control of foreign exchange and allocation of resources. While the Chinese economy has experienced significant growth over the past decades, growth has been uneven, both geographically and among various sectors of the economy. The Chinese government has implemented various measures to encourage economic growth and guide the allocation of resources. Some of these measures may benefit the overall Chinese economy, but may have a negative effect on us. Economic conditions in Hong Kong and China are sensitive to global economic conditions. Any prolonged slowdown in the global or Chinese economy may have a negative impact on our business, results of operations and financial condition. Additionally, continued turbulence in the international markets may adversely affect our ability to access the capital markets to meet liquidity needs. The recent outbreak of war in Ukraine has already affected global economic markets, and the uncertain resolution of this conflict could result in protracted and/or severe damage to the global economy. Russia’s recent military interventions in Ukraine have led to, and may lead to, additional sanctions being levied by the United States, European Union and other countries against Russia. Russia’s military incursion and the resulting sanctions could adversely affect global energy and financial markets and thus could affect our client’s business and our business, even though we do not have any direct exposure to Russia or the adjoining geographic regions. The extent and duration of the military action, sanctions, and resulting market disruptions are impossible to predict, but could be substantial. Any such disruptions caused by Russian military action or resulting sanctions may magnify the impact of other risks described in this section. We cannot predict the progress or outcome of the situation in Ukraine, as the conflict and governmental reactions are rapidly developing and beyond their control. Prolonged unrest, intensified military activities, or more extensive sanctions impacting the region could have a material adverse effect on the global economy, and such effect could in turn have a material adverse effect on the operations, results of operations, financial condition, liquidity and business outlook of our business. 34 Risks Associated with Acquiring and Operating a Target Business with its Primary Operation in China Our principal executive offices are located in Hong Kong, our Sponsor is located in Hong Kong, and certain of our executive officers and/or directors are located in or have significant ties to Hong Kong, and we may seek to acquire a company that is based in China or Hong Kong or a PRC Target Company which might require a VIE structure in an initial business combination. Because of such ties to China or Hong Kong, we may be subjected to the laws, rules and regulations of the PRC. Accordingly, we will be subject to the following risks associated with acquiring and operating a target business with its primary operation in China. If the PRC government deems that the contractual arrangements in relation to the potential PRC Target Company, the VIE, do not comply with PRC regulatory restrictions on foreign investment in the relevant industries, or if these regulations or the interpretation of existing regulations change in the future, we could be subject to severe penalties or be forced to relinquish our interests in those operations. We are a holding company with no operations of its own. Our initial business combination target company may include a PRC Target Company which might require a VIE structure. The PRC Target Company, through contractual arrangements, can consolidate the financial results of the VIE in our consolidated financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP or IFRS, if it has the power to direct activities that most significantly impact the economic performance of the VIE and have the obligation to absorb losses or the right to receive benefits from the VIE that could potentially be significant to the VIE. In that case, following the consummation of a business combination with a PRC Target Company, our securities would be securities of an offshore holding company instead of shares of the VIE in China. For a summary of the VIE contractual arrangements, see “Proposed Business — Initial Business Combination with a Company Based in China or Hong Kong.” We will rely on WFOE’s contractual arrangements with the VIE and its shareholders to operate the business. These contractual arrangements may not be as effective as direct ownership in respect of our relationship with the VIE. Under the contractual arrangements, as a legal matter, if the VIE or any of its shareholders executing the VIE Agreements fails to perform its, his or her respective obligations under the contractual arrangements, we may have to incur substantial costs and resources to enforce such arrangements, and rely on legal remedies available under PRC laws, including seeking specific performance or injunctive relief, and claiming damages, which we cannot assure you will be effective. For example, if shareholders of a variable interest entity were to refuse to transfer their equity interests in such variable interest entity to us or our designated persons when we exercise the purchase option pursuant to the contractual arrangements, we may have to take a legal action to compel them to fulfill their contractual obligations. If (i) the applicable PRC authorities invalidate the contractual arrangements for violation of PRC laws, rules and regulations, (ii) any variable interest entity or its shareholders terminate the contractual arrangements, (iii) any variable interest entity or its shareholders fail to perform its/his/her obligations under the contractual arrangements, or (iv) if these regulations change or are interpreted differently in the future, the PRC Target Company’s business operations in China would be materially and adversely affected, and the value of your securities would substantially decrease or even become worthless. Further, if we fail to renew the contractual arrangements upon their expiration, we would not be able to continue the business operations unless the then current PRC law allows us to directly operate businesses in China. In addition, if any VIE or all or part of its assets become subject to liens or rights of third-party creditors, we may be unable to continue some or all of our business activities, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. If any of the variable interest entities undergoes a voluntary or involuntary liquidation proceeding, its shareholders or unrelated third-party creditors may claim rights to some or all of these assets, thereby hindering our ability to operate our business, which could materially and adversely affect our business and our ability to generate revenues. 35 All of the contractual arrangements will be governed by PRC law and provided for the resolution of disputes through arbitration in the PRC. Accordingly, these contracts will be interpreted in accordance with PRC laws and any disputes will be resolved in accordance with PRC legal procedures. The legal environment in the PRC is not as developed as in some other jurisdictions, such as the United States. As a result, uncertainties in the PRC legal system could limit our ability to enforce the contractual arrangements. In the event we are unable to enforce the contractual arrangements, we may not be able to exercise the power to direct activities that most impact the economic performance, bears the risks of, and enjoys the rewards for the purpose of consolidating the financial results of the VIE in our consolidated financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP or IFRS (as discussed above) and we may be precluded from operating our business, which would have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. Although based on industry practices, VIE contractual arrangements among WFOE, the VIE and its shareholders governed by PRC laws are valid, binding and enforceable, and will not result in any violation of PRC laws or regulations currently in effect, however, there are substantial uncertainties regarding the interpretation and application of current and future PRC laws, regulations and rules. Accordingly, the PRC regulatory authorities may ultimately take a view that is contrary to the accepted industry practices with respect to VIE contractual arrangements. In addition, it is uncertain whether any new PRC laws or regulations relating to variable interest entity structures will be adopted or if adopted, what they would provide. PRC government authorities may deem that foreign ownership is directly or indirectly involved in the VIE’s shareholding structure. If our potential corporate structure and contractual arrangements are deemed by the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, or MIIT, or the Ministry of Commerce, or MOFCOM, or other regulators having competent authority to be illegal, either in whole or in part, we may lose control of the consolidated VIE and have to modify such structure to comply with regulatory requirements. However, there can be no assurance that we can achieve this without material disruption to the PRC Target Company’s business. Furthermore, if we or the VIE is found to be in violation of any existing or future PRC laws or regulations, or fail to obtain or maintain any of the required permits or approvals, the relevant PRC regulatory authorities would have broad discretion to take action in dealing with such violations or failures, including, without limitation: ●revoking the business license and/or operating licenses of WFOE or the VIE; ●discontinuing or placing restrictions or onerous conditions on our operations through any transactions among WFOE, the VIE and its subsidiaries; ●imposing fines, confiscating the income from WFOE, the VIE or its subsidiaries, or imposing other requirements with which we or the VIE may not be able to comply; ●placing restrictions on our right to collect revenues; ●requiring us to restructure our ownership structure or operations, including terminating the contractual arrangements with the VIE and deregistering the equity pledges of the VIE, which in turn would affect our ability to consolidate, exercises the power to direct activities that most impact the economic performance, bears the risks of, or enjoys the rewards normally associated with ownership of the entity; or ●taking other regulatory or enforcement actions against us that could be harmful to our business. The imposition of any of these penalties will result in a material and adverse effect on our potential ability to conduct the business. In addition, it is unclear what impact the PRC government actions will have on us and on our ability to consolidate the financial results of the VIE in our consolidated financial statements, if the PRC government authorities were to find our potential corporate structure and contractual arrangements to be in violation of PRC laws and regulations. If the imposition of any of these government actions causes us to lose our right to direct the activities of the VIE or our right to receive substantially all the economic benefits and residual returns from the VIE and we are not able to restructure our ownership structure and operations in a timely and satisfactory manner, we will no longer be able to consolidate the financial results of the VIE in our consolidated financial statements. Either of these results, or any other significant penalties that might be imposed on us in this event, it will have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and our securities shares may decline in value or be worthless. 36 The contractual arrangements under a VIE Structure may not be as effective as direct ownership in respect of our relationship with the VIE, and thus, we may incur substantial costs to enforce the terms of the arrangements, which we may not be able to enforce at all. The contractual arrangements may not be as effective as direct ownership in respect of our relationship with the VIE. For example, the VIE and its shareholders could breach their contractual arrangements with us by, among other things, failing to conduct their operations in an acceptable manner or taking other actions that are detrimental to our interests. If we had direct ownership of the VIE, we would be able to exercise our rights as a shareholder to effect changes in the board of directors of the VIE, which in turn could implement changes, subject to any applicable fiduciary obligations, at the management and operational level. However, under the VIE Agreements, we rely on the performance by the VIE and its shareholders of their obligations under the contracts to exercise control over the VIE. The shareholders of the consolidated VIE may not act in the best interests of our company or may not perform their obligations under these contracts. Such risks exist throughout the period in which we intend to operate certain portions of our business through the contractual arrangements with the VIE. If the VIE or its shareholders fail to perform their respective obligations under the contractual arrangements, we may have to incur substantial costs and expend additional resources to enforce such arrangements. For example, if the shareholders of the VIE refuse to transfer their equity interest in the VIE to us or our designee if we exercise the purchase option pursuant to the contractual arrangements, or if they otherwise act in bad faith toward us, then we may have to take legal actions to compel them to perform their contractual obligations. In addition, if any third parties claim any interest in such shareholders’ equity interests in the VIE, our ability to exercise shareholders’ rights or foreclose the share pledge according to the contractual arrangements may be impaired. If these or other disputes between the shareholders of the VIE and third parties were to impair our relationship with the VIE, our ability to consolidate the financial results of the VIE would be affected, which would in turn result in a material adverse effect on the business, operations and financial condition. Any failure by the VIE or its shareholders to perform their obligations under our contractual arrangements with them would have a material adverse effect on our business. The shareholders of the VIE are referred as its nominee shareholders because although they remain the holders of equity interests on record in the VIE, pursuant to the terms of the relevant power of attorney, such shareholders have irrevocably authorized the individual appointed by the WFOE to exercise their rights as a shareholder of the relevant VIE. If the VIE, or its shareholders fail to perform their respective obligations under the contractual arrangements, we may have to incur substantial costs and expend additional resources to enforce such arrangements. We may also have to rely on legal remedies under PRC laws, including seeking specific performance or injunctive relief, and claiming damages, which we cannot assure you will be effective under PRC laws. For example, if the shareholders of the VIE were to refuse to transfer their equity interest in the VIE to us or our designee if we exercise the purchase option pursuant to these contractual arrangements, or if they were otherwise to act in bad faith toward us, then we may have to take legal actions to compel them to perform their contractual obligations. All of these contractual arrangements may be governed by and interpreted in accordance with PRC law, and disputes arising from these contractual arrangements may be resolved in court or through arbitration in China. Accordingly, these contracts will be interpreted in accordance with PRC laws and any disputes will be resolved in accordance with PRC legal procedures. The legal system in the PRC is not as developed as in some other jurisdictions, such as the United States. As a result, uncertainties in the PRC legal system could limit our ability to enforce these contractual arrangements. See “Risks Associated with Acquiring and Operating a Target Business with its Primary Operation in China — Uncertainties with respect to the PRC legal system could adversely affect us.” Meanwhile, there are very few precedents and little formal guidance as to how contractual arrangements in the context of a consolidated variable interest entity should be interpreted or enforced under PRC laws. There remain significant uncertainties regarding the ultimate outcome of such arbitration should legal action become necessary. In addition, under PRC laws, rulings by arbitrators are final and parties cannot appeal arbitration results in court unless such rulings are revoked or determined unenforceable by a competent court. If the losing parties fail to carry out the arbitration awards within a prescribed time limit, the prevailing parties may only enforce the arbitration awards in PRC courts through arbitration award recognition proceedings, which would require additional expenses and delay. In the event that we are unable to enforce these contractual arrangements, or if we suffer significant delay or other obstacles in the process of enforcing these contractual arrangements, we may not consolidate the financial results of the VIE in our consolidated financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP or IFRS, and our ability to conduct our business may be negatively affected. 37 In the event we were to successfully consummate a business combination with a target business with primary operation in PRC, we will be subject to restrictions on dividend payments following consummation of our initial business combination. After we consummate our initial business combination, we may rely on dividends and other distributions from our operating company to provide us with cash flow and to meet our other obligations. Current regulations in China would permit our operating company in China to pay dividends to us only out of its accumulated distributable profits, if any, determined in accordance with Chinese accounting standards and regulations. In addition, our operating company in China will be required to set aside at least 10% (up to an aggregate amount equal to half of its registered capital) of its accumulated profits each year. Such cash reserve may not be distributed as cash dividends. In addition, if PRC Target Company’s operating company in China incurs debt on its own behalf in the future, the instruments governing the debt may restrict its ability to pay dividends or make other payments to us. The PRC government may intervene or influence the Target Operating Entity’s business operations at any time or may exert more control over offerings conducted overseas and foreign investment in China based issuers, which could result in a material change in the Target Operating Entity’s business operations post business combination and/or the value of our securities. Additionally, the governmental and regulatory interference could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors post business combination and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless. Statements by the Chinese government in 2021 have indicated an intent to exert more oversight and control over offerings that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investments in China-based issuers. The PRC has proposed new rules in 2021 that would require companies collecting or holding large amounts of data to undergo a cybersecurity review prior to listing in foreign countries, a move that would significantly tighten oversight over China based internet giants. On November 14, 2021, the Cyberspace Administration of China, or CAC, has publicly solicited opinion on the Regulation on Network Data Security Management (Consultation Draft), which stipulates that data processor that undertakes data processing activities using Internet networks within China shall apply for the cybersecurity review if it conducts data processing activities that will or may have an impact on the national security. The review is mandatory if the data processor controls more than 1 million users’ personal information and intends to be listed in a foreign country, or if the data processor that will or may impact the national security seeks to be listed in Hong Kong. As of the date of this report, the Draft Regulation on Network Data Security Management has not been formally adopted. On December 28, 2021, the Cyberspace Administration of China, jointly with 12 departments under the State Council, promulgated the Measures for Cybersecurity Review, which became effective on February 15, 2022. According to the Measures for Cybersecurity Review, operators of critical information infrastructure purchasing network products and services, and data processors carrying out data processing activities that affect or may affect national security, shall conduct cyber security review. An operator, including operators of critical information infrastructure and data processors, who controls more than 1 million users’ personal information must report to the Cyber Security Review Office for a cybersecurity review if it intends to be listed in a foreign country. Our initial business combination target company may include a PRC Target Company. Therefore, it is uncertain whether such PRC Target Company will be involved in the collection of user data, implicate cybersecurity, or involve any other type of restricted industry. Based on our understanding of currently applicable PRC laws and regulations, our registered public offering in the U.S. is not subject to the review or prior approval of the CAC or the CSRC. Uncertainties still exist, however, due to the possibility that laws, regulations, or policies in the PRC could change rapidly in the future. Any future action by the PRC government expanding the categories of industries and companies whose foreign securities offerings are subject to review by the CSRC or the CAC could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and could cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless. 38 As a result of merger and acquisition regulations implemented on September 8, 2006 (amended on June 22, 2009) relating to acquisitions of assets and equity interests of Chinese companies by foreign persons, it is expected that acquisitions will take longer and be subject to economic scrutiny by the PRC government authorities such that we may not be able to complete a transaction. On September 8, 2006, the Ministry of Commerce, together with several other government agencies, promulgated the Regulations on Merger and Acquisition of Domestic Enterprises by Foreign Investors (the “M&A Regulations”, including its amendment on June 22, 2009), which implemented a comprehensive set of regulations governing the approval process by which a Chinese company may participate in an acquisition of its assets or its equity interests and by which a Chinese company may obtain public trading of its securities on a securities exchange outside the PRC. Although there was a complex series of regulations in place prior to September 8, 2006 for approval of Chinese enterprises that were administered by a combination of provincial and centralized agencies, the M&A Regulations have largely centralized and expanded the approval process to the Ministry of Commerce, the State Administration of Industry and Commerce (SAIC), the State Administration of Foreign Exchange (SAFE) or its branch offices, the State Asset Supervision and Administration Commission (SASAC), and the CSRC. Depending on the structure of the transaction, these M&A Regulations will require the Chinese parties to make a series of applications and supplemental applications to one or more of the aforementioned agencies, some of which must be made within strict time limits and depending on approvals from one or the other of the aforementioned agencies. The application process has been supplemented to require the presentation of economic data concerning a transaction, including appraisals of the business to be acquired and evaluations of the acquirer which will permit the government to assess the economics of a transaction in addition to the compliance with legal requirements. If obtained, approvals will have expiration dates by which a transaction must be completed. Also, completed transactions must be reported to the Ministry of Commerce and some of the other agencies within a short period after closing or be subject to an unwinding of the transaction. Therefore, acquisitions in China may not be able to be completed because the terms of the transaction may not satisfy aspects of the approval process and may not be completed, even if approved, if they are not consummated within the time permitted by the approvals granted. China Securities Regulatory Commission and other Chinese government agencies may exert more oversight and control over offerings that are conducted overseas and foreign investment in China-based issuers. If we seek to enter into a business combination with a PRC Target Company, additional compliance procedures may be required in connection with future offerings of our securities and our business combination process, and, if required, we cannot predict whether we will be able to obtain such approval. As a result, both our investors and us face uncertainty about future actions by the PRC government that could significantly affect our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of our securities to significantly decline or be worthless. On July 6, 2021, the General Office of the Communist Party of China Central Committee and the General Office of the State Council jointly issued a document to crack down on illegal activities in the securities market and promote the high-quality development of the capital markets, which, among other things, requires the relevant governmental authorities to strengthen cross-border oversight of law-enforcement and judicial cooperation, to enhance supervision over China-based companies listed overseas, and to establish and improve the system of extraterritorial application of the PRC securities laws. Since this document is relatively new, uncertainties still exist in relation to how soon legislative or administrative regulation making bodies will respond and what existing or new laws or regulations or detailed implementations and interpretations will be modified or promulgated, if any, and the potential impact such modified or new laws and regulations will have on our future business combination with a company with major operation in China. Therefore, CSRC and other Chinese government agencies may exert more oversight and control over offerings that are conducted overseas and foreign investment in China-based issuers. Additional compliance procedures may be required in connection with this offering and our business combination process, and, if required, we cannot predict whether we will be able to obtain such approval. As a result, both you and us face uncertainty about future actions by the PRC government that could significantly affect our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of our securities to significantly decline or be worthless. 39 The Chinese government may exercise significant oversight and discretion over the conduct of our post-combination entity’s business and may intervene in or influence its operations at any time, which could result in a material change in its operations and/or the value of our securities. We are also currently not required to obtain approval from Chinese authorities to list on U.S. exchanges, however, if the PRC Target Company and the VIE were required to obtain approval in the future and were denied permission from Chinese authorities to list on U.S. exchanges, we will not be able to continue listing on U.S. exchange, which would materially affect the interest of the investors. The Chinese government has exercised and continues to exercise substantial control over virtually every sector of the Chinese economy through regulation and state ownership. Our ability to operate through a PRC Target Company and a VIE in China may be harmed by changes in its laws and regulations, including those relating to taxation, environmental regulations, land use rights, property and other matters. The central or local governments of these jurisdictions may impose new, stricter regulations or interpretations of existing regulations that would require additional expenditures and efforts on our part to ensure our compliance with such regulations or interpretations. Accordingly, government actions in the future, including any decision not to continue to support recent economic reforms and to return to a more centrally planned economy or regional or local variations in the implementation of economic policies, could have a significant effect on economic conditions in China or particular regions thereof, and could require us to divest ourselves of any interest we then hold in Chinese properties. For example, the Chinese cybersecurity regulator announced on July 2, 2021 that it had begun an investigation of Didi Global Inc. (NYSE: DIDI) and two days later ordered that the company’s app be removed from smartphone app stores. On July 24, 2021, the General Office of the Communist Party of China Central Committee and the General Office of the State Council jointly released the Guidelines for Further Easing the Burden of Excessive Homework and Off-campus Tutoring for Students at the Stage of Compulsory Education, pursuant to which foreign investment in such firms via mergers and acquisitions, franchise development, and variable interest entities are banned from this sector. As such, the PRC Target Company’s business segments may be subject to various government and regulatory interference in the provinces in which they operate. The PRC Target Company could be subject to regulations by various political and regulatory entities, including various local and municipal agencies and government sub-divisions, and these regulations may be interpreted and applied inconsistently by different agencies or authorities. The PRC Target Company may incur increased costs necessary to comply with existing and newly adopted laws and regulations or penalties for any failure to comply, and such compliance or any associated inquiries or investigations or any other government actions may: ●delay or impede our development; ●result in negative publicity or increase the Company’s operating costs; ●require significant management time and attention; and ●subject the post-combination entity to remedies, administrative penalties and even criminal liabilities that may harm our business, including fines assessed for our current or historical operations, or demands or orders that we modify or even cease our business practices. Our initial business combination target company may include a PRC Target Company. Therefore, it is uncertain when and whether we and the post-combination entity will be required to obtain permission from the PRC government to list on U.S. exchanges, and even when such permission is obtained, whether it will be denied or rescinded. Further, the promulgation of new laws or regulations, or the new interpretation of existing laws and regulations, in each case that restrict or otherwise unfavorably may impact the ability or way the post-combination entity may conduct its business and could require it to change certain aspects of its business to ensure compliance, which could decrease demand for its products or services, reduce revenues, increase costs, require us to obtain more licenses, permits, approvals or certificates, or subject it to additional liabilities. As such, the post-combination entity’s operations could be adversely affected, directly or indirectly, by existing or future PRC laws and regulations relating to its business or industry, which could result in a material adverse change in the value of our securities, potentially rendering it worthless. As a result, both our investors and us face uncertainty about future actions by the PRC government that could significantly affect our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of our securities to significantly decline or be worthless. 40 Changes in the policies, regulations, rules, and the enforcement of laws of the PRC government may be quick with little advance notice and could have a significant impact upon our ability to operate profitably in the PRC. Our post-combination entity may conduct most of its operations and generate most of its revenue in the PRC. Accordingly, economic, political and legal developments in the PRC will significantly affect our post-combination entity’s business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. Policies, regulations, rules, and the enforcement of laws of the PRC government can have significant effects on economic conditions in the PRC and the ability of businesses to operate profitably. Our post-combination entity’s ability to operate profitably in the PRC may be adversely affected by changes in policies by the PRC government, including changes in laws, regulations or their interpretation, particularly those dealing with the Internet, including censorship and other restriction on material which can be transmitted over the Internet, security, intellectual property, money laundering, taxation and other laws that affect our post-combination entity’s ability to operate its business. Any actions by the PRC government to exert more oversight and control over offerings (including businesses whose primary operations are in Hong Kong) that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investments in Hong Kong- or PRC-based issuers could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of our securities to significantly decline or be worthless. We and our initial business combination may be subject to a variety of PRC laws and other obligations regarding cybersecurity and data protection and we may have to spend additional resources and incur additional time delays to complete any such business combination or be prevented from pursuing certain investment opportunities. We and our initial business combination, if with a PRC Target Company, may be subject to PRC laws relating to the collection, use, sharing, retention, security, and transfer of confidential and private information, such as personal information and other data. These laws continue to develop, and the PRC government may adopt other rules and restrictions in the future. Non-compliance could result in penalties or other significant legal liabilities. For instance, various regulatory bodies in China, including CAC, the Ministry of Public Security and the State Administration for Market Regulation, have enforced data privacy and protection laws and regulations with varying and evolving standards and interpretations. In April 2020, the Chinese government promulgated Cybersecurity Review Measures, which came into effect on June 1, 2020. Pursuant to the Cybersecurity Review Measures, operators of critical information infrastructure must pass a cybersecurity review when purchasing network products and services which do or may affect national security. On November 14, 2021, the Cyberspace Administration of China has publicly solicited opinion on the Regulation on Network Data Security Management (Consultation Draft), which stipulates that data processor that undertakes data processing activities using Internet networks within China shall apply for the cybersecurity review if it conducts data processing activities that will or may have an impact on the national security. The review is mandatory if the data processor controls more than 1 million users’ personal information and intends to be listed in a foreign country, or if the data processor that will or may impact the national security seeks to be listed in Hong Kong. As of the date of this report, the Draft Regulation on Network Data Security Management has not been formally adopted. On December 28, 2021, the Cyberspace Administration of China, jointly with 12 departments under the State Council, promulgated the Measures for Cybersecurity Review, which became effective on February 15, 2022. According to the Measures for Cybersecurity Review, operators of critical information infrastructure purchasing network products and services, and data processors carrying out data processing activities that affect or may affect national security, shall conduct cyber security review. An operator, including operators of critical information infrastructure and data processors, who controls more than 1 million users’ personal information must report to the Cyber Security Review Office for a cybersecurity review if it intends to be listed in a foreign country. Certain internet platforms in China have been reportedly subject to heightened regulatory scrutiny in relation to cybersecurity matters. As of the date of this report, we have not been informed by any PRC governmental authority of any requirement that we file for a cybersecurity review. As a result, it will not affect our process of searching for a business combination target until further certainty in the interpretation and enforcement of relevant PRC cybersecurity laws and regulations. However, if we or the combined company following a business combination are deemed to be a critical information infrastructure operator or a company that is engaged in data processing and holds personal information of more than one million users, we could be subject to PRC cybersecurity review. As there remains significant uncertainty in the interpretation and enforcement of relevant PRC cybersecurity laws and regulations, we or the combined company following a business combination could be subject to cybersecurity review, and if so, it is uncertain whether we can or how long it will take us to obtain such approval or complete such procedures and any such approval could be rescinded and we may not be able to pass such review in relation to this offering, searching for a business combination target, or a business combination. In addition, we could become subject to enhanced cybersecurity review or investigations launched by PRC regulators in the future. Any failure or delay in the completion of the cybersecurity review procedures or any other non-compliance with the related laws and regulations may result in fines or other penalties, including suspension of business, website closure, and revocation of prerequisite licenses, as well as reputational damage or legal proceedings or actions, which may have material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. 41 On June 10, 2021, the Standing Committee of the PRC National People’s Congress, or SCNPC, promulgated the PRC Data Security Law, which will take effect in September 2021. The PRC Data Security Law imposes data security and privacy obligations on entities and individuals carrying out data activities, and introduces a data classification and hierarchical protection system based on the importance of data in economic and social development, and the degree of harm it will cause to national security, public interests, or legitimate rights and interests of individuals or organizations when such data is tampered with, destroyed, leaked, illegally acquired or used. The PRC Data Security Law also provides for a national security review procedure for data activities that may affect national security and imposes export restrictions on certain data and information. On August 20, 2021, the SCNPC adopted the Personal Information Protection Law, which shall come into force as of November 1, 2021. The Personal Information Protection Law includes the basic rules for personal information processing, the rules for cross-border provision of personal information, the rights of individuals in personal information processing activities, the obligations of personal information processors, and the legal responsibilities for illegal collection, processing, and use of personal information. These rules could result in us not being able to acquire a potential target in the PRC, or our using time and working capital to pursue a transaction that cannot be completed because of the actions of regulators. As uncertainties remain regarding the interpretation and implementation of these laws and regulations, we cannot assure you that we or the combined company following a business combination will comply with such regulations in all respects and we or the combined company following a business combination may be ordered to rectify or terminate any actions that are deemed illegal by regulatory authorities. We or the combined company following a business combination may also become subject to fines and/or other sanctions which may have material adverse effect on our business, operations and financial condition. If we become directly subject to the recent scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity involving U.S.-listed Chinese companies, we may have to expend significant resources to investigate and resolve the matter which could harm our business operations, this offering and our reputation and could result in a loss of your investment in our ordinary shares, especially if such matter cannot be addressed and resolved favorably. Recently, U.S. public companies that have substantially all of their operations in China, have been subjected to intense scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity by investors, financial commentators and regulatory agencies, such as the SEC. Much of the scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity has centered around financial and accounting irregularities, a lack of effective internal controls over financial accounting, inadequate corporate governance policies or a lack of adherence thereto and, in many cases, allegations of fraud. As a result of the scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity, the publicly traded stock of many U.S. listed Chinese companies has sharply decreased in value and, in some cases, has become virtually worthless. Many of these companies are now subject to shareholder lawsuits and SEC enforcement actions and are conducting internal and external investigations into the allegations. It is not clear what effect this sector-wide scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity will have on our Company if we target a PRC company with respect to the initial business combination. If we become the subject of any unfavorable allegations, whether such allegations are proven to be true or untrue, we will have to expend significant resources to investigate such allegations and/or defend the Company. This situation may be a major distraction to our management. If such allegations are not proven to be groundless, we will be severely hampered and your investment in our securities could be rendered worthless. Compliance with the PRC Antitrust law may limit our ability to effect our initial business combination. The PRC Antitrust Law became effective on August 1, 2008. The government authorities in charge of antitrust matters in China are the Antitrust Commission and other antitrust authorities under the State Council. The PRC Antitrust Law regulates (1) monopoly agreements, including decisions or actions in concert that preclude or impede competition, entered into by business operators; (2) abuse of dominant market position by business operators; and (3) concentration of business operators that may have the effect of precluding or impeding competition. To implement the Antitrust Law, in 2008, the State Council formulated the regulations that require filing of concentration of business operators, pursuant to which concentration of business operators refers to (1) merger with other business operators; (2) gaining control over other business operators through acquisition of equity interest or assets of other business operators; and (3) gaining control over other business operators through exerting influence on other business operators through contracts or other means. In 2009, the Ministry of Commerce, to which the Antitrust Commission is affiliated, promulgated the Measures for Filing of Concentration of Business Operators (amended by the Guidelines for Filing of Concentration of Business Operators in 2014), which set forth the criteria of concentration and the requirement of miscellaneous documents for the purpose of filing. The business combination we contemplate may be considered the concentration of business operators, and to the extent required by the Antitrust Law and the criteria established by the State Council, we must file with the antitrust authority under the PRC State Council prior to conducting the contemplated business combination. If the antitrust authority decides not to further investigate whether the contemplated business combination has the effect of precluding or impeding competition or fails to make a decision within 30 days from receipt of relevant materials, we may proceed to consummate the contemplated business combination. If antitrust authority decides to prohibit the contemplated business combination after further investigation, we must terminate such business combination and would then be forced to either attempt to complete a new business combination if it was prior to 15 wait months from the closing of our offering or we would be required to return any amounts which were held in the trust account to our shareholders. When we evaluate a potential business combination, we will consider the need to comply with the Antitrust Law and other relevant regulations which may limit our ability to effect an acquisition or may result in our modifying or not pursuing a particular transaction. 42 Enhanced scrutiny over acquisition transactions by the PRC tax authorities may have a negative impact on potential acquisitions we may pursue in the future. The PRC tax authorities have enhanced their scrutiny over the direct or indirect transfer of certain taxable assets, including, in particular, equity interests in a PRC resident enterprise, by a non-resident enterprise by promulgating and implementing SAT Circular 59 and Circular 698, which became effective in January 2008, and a Circular 7 in replacement of some of the existing rules in Circular 698, which became effective in February 2015. Under Circular 698, where a non-resident enterprise conducts an “indirect transfer” by transferring the equity interests of a PRC “resident enterprise” indirectly by disposing of the equity interests of an overseas holding company, the non-resident enterprise, being the transferor, may be subject to PRC corporate income tax, if the indirect transfer is considered to be an abusive use of company structure without reasonable commercial purposes. As a result, gains derived from such indirect transfer may be subject to PRC tax at a rate of up to 10%. Circular 698 also provides that, where a non-PRC resident enterprise transfers its equity interests in a PRC resident enterprise to its related parties at a price lower than the fair market value, the relevant tax authority has the power to make a reasonable adjustment to the taxable income of the transaction. In February 2015, the SAT issued Circular 7 to replace the rules relating to indirect transfers in Circular 698. Circular 7 has introduced a new tax regime that is significantly different from that under Circular 698. Circular 7 extends its tax jurisdiction to not only indirect transfers set forth under Circular 698 but also transactions involving transfer of other taxable assets, through the offshore transfer of a foreign intermediate holding company. In addition, Circular 7 provides clearer criteria than Circular 698 on how to assess reasonable commercial purposes and has introduced safe harbors for internal group restructurings and the purchase and sale of equity through a public securities market. Circular 7 also brings challenges to both the foreign transferor and transferee (or other person who is obligated to pay for the transfer) of the taxable assets. Where a non-resident enterprise conducts an “indirect transfer” by transferring the taxable assets indirectly by disposing of the equity interests of an overseas holding company, the non-resident enterprise being the transferor, or the transferee, or the PRC entity which directly owned the taxable assets may report to the relevant tax authority such indirect transfer. Using a “substance over form” principle, the PRC tax authority may disregard the existence of the overseas holding company if it lacks a reasonable commercial purpose and was established for the purpose of reducing, avoiding or deferring PRC tax. As a result, gains derived from such indirect transfer may be subject to PRC corporate income tax, and the transferee or other person who is obligated to pay for the transfer is obligated to withhold the applicable taxes, currently at a rate of 10% for the transfer of equity interests in a PRC resident enterprise. We may face uncertainties on the reporting and consequences on future private equity financing transactions, share exchange or other transactions involving the transfer of shares in our company by investors that are non-PRC resident enterprises. The PRC tax authorities may pursue such non-resident enterprises with respect to a filing or the transferees with respect to withholding obligation, and request our PRC subsidiaries to assist in the filing. As a result, we and non-resident enterprises in such transactions may become at risk of being subject to filing obligations or being taxed, under Circular 59 or Circular 698 and Circular 7, and may be required to expend valuable resources to comply with Circular 59, Circular 698 and Circular 7 or to establish that we and our non-resident enterprises should not be taxed under these circulars, which may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. The PRC tax authorities have the discretion under SAT Circular 59, Circular 698 and Circular 7 to make adjustments to the taxable capital gains based on the difference between the fair value of the taxable assets transferred and the cost of investment. Although we currently have no plans to pursue any acquisitions in China or elsewhere in the world, we may pursue acquisitions in the future that may involve complex corporate structures. If we are considered a non-resident enterprise under the PRC corporate income tax law and if the PRC tax authorities make adjustments to the taxable income of the transactions under SAT Circular 59 or Circular 698 and Circular 7, our income tax costs associated with such potential acquisitions will be increased, which may have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. 43 The approval of the China Securities Regulatory Commission is not required in connection with our offering, however, if required, we cannot predict whether we will be able to obtain such approval. The M&A Regulations, adopted by six PRC regulatory agencies requires an overseas special purpose vehicle formed for listing purposes through acquisitions of PRC domestic companies and controlled by PRC companies or individuals to obtain the approval of the CSRC prior to the listing and trading of such special purpose vehicle’s securities on an overseas stock exchange. On September 21, 2006, the CSRC published on its official website procedures specifying documents and materials required to be submitted to it by any such special purpose vehicle seeking CSRC’s approval of overseas listings. However, substantial uncertainty remains regarding the scope and applicability of the M&A Regulations and the CSRC approval requirement to offshore special purpose vehicles. In addition, the Opinions jointly issued by the General Office of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China and the General Office of the State Council (the “Opinions”), which were made available to the public on July 6, 2021, call for strengthened regulation over illegal securities activities and supervision of overseas listings by China-based companies and propose to take effective measures, such as promoting the development of relevant regulatory systems to deal with the risks and incidents faced by China-based overseas-listed companies. The Opinions also provide that the State Council will revise provisions regarding the overseas issuance and listing of shares by companies limited by shares and will clarify the duties of domestic regulatory authorities. As of the date of this report, no official guidance and related implementation rules have been issued in relation to the recently issued Opinions and the interpretation and implementation of the Opinions remain unclear at this stage. Based on our understanding of the current PRC laws and regulations, our company is not required to obtain any prior permission under the M&A Regulations or the Opinions from any PRC governmental authorities (including the CSRC) for consummating our offering, given that: (a) the CSRC currently has not issued any definitive rule or interpretation concerning whether offerings like ours under our prospectus dated March 1, 2021 are subject to the M&A Regulations; and (b) our company is a blank check company newly incorporated in the British Virgin Islands rather than in China and currently our company does not own or control any equity interest in any PRC company or operate any business in China. As of the date of this annual report, we have not received any inquiry, notice, warning, sanctions or regulatory objection to this offering from the CSRC or any other PRC governmental authorities. However, there remains some uncertainty and no assurance as to how our interpretations to the M&A Rules and the Opinions will be interpreted or implemented by the relevant PRC governmental authorities, including the CSRC, or that the CSRC or any other PRC governmental authorities would not promulgate new rules or adopt new interpretation of existing rules that would require us to obtain CSRC or other PRC governmental approvals for our offering or, in the context of an overseas offering or if we decide to consummate the business combination with a target business based in and primarily operating in China. Furthermore, CAC, issued the draft amendment to the Cybersecurity Review Measures in July 2021, which provides, among other things, that an application for cyber security review shall be made by an issuer who is a critical information infrastructure operator or a data processing operator as defined therein before such issuer’s listing in a foreign country if the issuer possesses personal information of more than one million users, and that the relevant governmental authorities in the PRC may initiate cybersecurity review if such governmental authorities determine an operator’s cyber products or services, data processing or potential listing in a foreign country affect or may affect national security. Such draft amendment was released for public comment, and its provisions and anticipated adoption or effective date are subject to changes and thus its interpretation and implementation remain substantially uncertain. While the application of the M&A Rules remains unclear, we believe that the CSRC approval was not required in the context of our offering. However, there can be no assurance that the relevant PRC government agencies, including the CSRC, would reach the same conclusion. If the CSRC or another PRC governmental authority subsequently determines that its approval is needed for our offering, or for our business combination with a target business based in and primarily operating in China, or approval obtained for the business combination is subsequently rescinded, we may face adverse actions or sanctions by the CSRC or other PRC governmental authorities. These governmental authorities may delay a potential business combination, impose fines and penalties, limit our operations in China, or take other actions that could result in our inability to consummate an initial business combination with a China-based business, or materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, reputation and prospects, as well as the trading price of our securities or the continued listing on U.S. exchange. Any changes in PRC law, regulations, or interpretations may severely affect our operations after our IPO. The use of the term “operate” and “operations” includes the process of searching for a target business and conducting related activities. To that extent, we may not be able to conduct the process of searching of a potential target company in China. If we decide to consummate our business combination with a target business based in and primarily operating in China, the combined company’s business operations in China through its subsidiaries and VIEs, as applicable, are subject to relevant requirements to obtain applicable licenses from PRC governmental authorities under relevant PRC laws and regulations. 44 Uncertainties with respect to the PRC legal system could adversely affect us. Our principal executive offices are located in Hong Kong, our Sponsor is located in Hong Kong, and certain of our executive officers and/or directors are located in or have significant ties to Hong Kong, and we may seek to acquire a company that is based in China or Hong Kong in an initial business combination. The uncertainties in the interpretation and enforcement of PRC laws, rules and regulations would apply to us if we were to acquire a company that is based in China or Hong Kong regardless of whether we have a VIE structure or direct ownership structure post-business combination. Because of such ties to China or Hong Kong, we may be governed by PRC laws and regulations. PRC companies and variable interests entities are generally subject to laws and regulations applicable to foreign investments in China and, in particular, laws and regulations applicable to wholly foreign-owned enterprises. The PRC legal system is based on statutes. Prior court decisions may be cited for reference but have limited precedential value. Since 1979, PRC legislation and regulations have significantly enhanced the protections afforded to various forms of foreign investments in China. However, China has not developed a fully integrated legal system and recently enacted laws and regulations may not sufficiently cover all aspects of economic activities in China. In particular, because these laws and regulations are relatively new, and because of the limited volume of published decisions and their nonbinding nature, the interpretation and enforcement of these laws and regulations involve uncertainties. In addition, the PRC legal system is based in part on government policies and internal rules (some of which are not published on a timely basis or at all) that may have a retroactive effect. As a result, we may not be aware of our violation of these policies and rules until sometime after the violation. In addition, any litigation in China may be protracted and result in substantial costs and diversion of resources and management attention. PRC regulation of loans and direct investment by offshore holding companies to PRC entities may delay or prevent us from using the proceeds of our offering to make loans or additional capital contributions to our PRC subsidiaries, which could materially and adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand our business. Any loans to PRC subsidiaries are subject to PRC regulations. For example, loans by us to subsidiaries in China, which are foreign invested entities (“FIEs”), to finance their activities cannot exceed statutory limits and must be registered with SAFE. On March 30, 2015, SAFE promulgated Hui Fa [2015] No.19, a notice regulating the conversion by a foreign-invested company of foreign currency into RMB. The foreign exchange capital, for which the monetary contribution has been confirmed by the foreign exchange authorities (or for which the monetary contribution has been registered for account entry) in the capital account of a foreign-invested enterprise may be settled at a bank as required by the enterprise’s actual management needs. Foreign-invested enterprises with investment as their main business (including foreign-oriented companies, foreign-invested venture capital enterprises and foreign-invested equity investment enterprises) are allowed to, under the premise of authenticity and compliance of their domestic investment projects, carry out based on their actual investment scales direct settlement of foreign exchange capital or transfer the RMB funds in the foreign exchange settlement account for pending payment to the invested enterprises’ accounts. On May 10, 2013, SAFE released Circular 21, which came into effect on May 13, 2013. According to Circular 21, SAFE has simplified the foreign exchange administration procedures with respect to the registration, account openings and conversions, settlements of FDI-related foreign exchange, as well as fund remittances. Circular 21 may significantly limit our ability to convert, transfer and use the net proceeds from this offering and any offering of additional equity securities in China, which may adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand our business in the PRC. We may also decide to finance the PRC Target Company’s subsidiaries by means of capital contributions. These capital contributions must be approved by MOFCOM or its local counterpart, which usually takes no more than 30 working days to complete. We may not be able to obtain these government approvals on a timely basis, if at all, with respect to future capital contributions by us to the PRC Target Company’s subsidiaries. If we fail to receive such approvals, we will not be able to capitalize our PRC operations, which could adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand our business. 45 Changes in China’s economic, political or social conditions or government policies could have a material adverse effect on the PRC Target Company’s business and results of operations we may pursue in the future. If our initial business combination target is a PRC company or Hong Kong with operations in China or Hong Kong, its business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations may be influenced to a significant degree by political, economic and social conditions in China generally and by continued economic growth in China as a whole. The Chinese economy differs from the economies of most developed countries in many respects, including the amount of government involvement, level of development, growth rate, control of foreign exchange and allocation of resources. Although the Chinese government has implemented measures emphasizing the utilization of market forces for economic reform, the reduction of state ownership of productive assets and the establishment of improved corporate governance in business enterprises, a substantial portion of productive assets in China is still owned by the government.