Quiver Quantitative

Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - EVOA

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$EVOA Risk Factor changes from 00/02/01/22/2022 to 00/06/30/22/2022

Item 1A. Risk Factors. In addition, we operate in a competitive and rapidly evolving industry in which new risks emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for us to predict all of the risks we may face, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor or combination of factors could cause actual results to differ from our expectations. As a result of these and other potential risks and uncertainties, our forward-looking statements should not be relied on or viewed as predictions of future events. All forward-looking statements in this report are made only as of the date of this document and, except as required by law, we undertake no obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements for any reason, including to conform these statements to actual results or to changes in our expectations. You should, however, review the factors and risks we describe in the reports we will file from time to time with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) after the date we file this report. We qualify all of our forward-looking statements by this cautionary note. iii PART I Item 1. Business. Our Business EVO Transportation & Energy Services, Inc. is a transportation provider serving the United States Postal Service (“USPS”) and other customers. We believe EVO is the second largest surface transportation company serving the USPS, with a diversified fleet of tractors, straight trucks, and other vehicles that currently operate on either diesel fuel or compressed natural gas (“CNG”). In certain markets, we fuel our vehicles at one of our three CNG stations that serve other customers as well. We are actively engaged in reducing CO2 emissions by operating on CNG, pursuing opportunities to use other alternative fuels, and by optimizing the routing efficiency of our operations to reduce fuel usage. We operate from our headquarters in Phoenix, Arizona and from 10 main terminals located throughout the United States. EVO has grown primarily through acquisitions, and we have completed seven acquisitions since our initial business combination in 2016. We have also grown organically by obtaining new contracts from the USPS and other customers. In 2021, we generated $270.7 million in revenue, which includes $34.8 million of nonrecurring revenue. We have been actively integrating the acquisitions we have made under common leadership and technology and are now operating under a single umbrella brand. Service and Product Offering Mail Transportation We transport mail and freight by truck for the USPS and other customers. Service and Product Offering Mail Transportation We transport mail and freight by truck for the USPS and other customers through approximately 350 contracts covering over 150,000 average daily route miles in aggregate. We competitively bid on transportation contracts that procure and specify the movement of mail between processing facilities and destination post offices. Customer contracts are typically four years in term and most often are renewed with the incumbent supplier if appropriate service has been performed in accordance with contract requirements including, but not limited to, USPS performance standards, Service Contract Act requirements, Department of Transportation (“DOT”) regulations (federal and state), and all other applicable local and state regulations. As of December 31, 2021, we held over 250 contracts with the USPS. Of these, 15 were Dynamic Route Optimization contracts and the remainder were traditional highway route contracts. Our mail transportation operations generated $270.7 million in revenue in 2021 (which includes $34.8 million of nonrecurring revenue), or 89% of our total revenues. Freight and Brokerage Services In addition to our USPS mail transportation and delivery services, we provide freight and brokerage services to various corporate customers. Our freight and brokerage services generated $33.0 million of revenues in 2021, or 11% of our total revenues.5 million of revenues in 2020, or 87% of our total revenues. Compressed Natural Gas Fueling We own three CNG fueling stations that serve our fleet and other customers. Those stations are located in Fort Worth, TX, Oak Creek, WI, and Tolleson, AZ and accommodate class 8 trucks and trailers. We have two additional CNG fueling stations located in Jurupa Valley, CA and San Antonio, TX that are no longer operational. Most of our CNG customers fuel at our stations under long term contracts and we have a small number of retail customers. Our CNG fueling operations generated $0.4 million of revenues in 2021, or less than 1% of our total revenues.5 million of revenues in 2020, or 87% of our total revenues. History The Company was incorporated in the State of Delaware on October 22, 2010 under the name “Minn Shares Inc.” From December 2010 until November 2016, Minn Shares Inc. was considered a public “shell” company and dedicated its operations to seeking a potential merger or acquisition partner. On November 22, 2016, the Company and Titan CNG LLC, a Delaware limited liability company in the business of owning and operating compressed natural gas fueling stations (“Titan”), entered into an agreement and plan of securities exchange whereby the members of Titan acquired approximately 90% of the Company’s outstanding shares. On November 22, 2016, the Company and Titan CNG LLC, a Delaware limited liability company in the business of owning and operating compressed natural gas fueling stations (“Titan”), entered into an agreement and plan of securities exchange whereby the members of Titan acquired approximately 90% of the Company’s outstanding shares. Following the closing, the business plan of Titan became the business plan of the Company and all former officers of the Company resigned and were replaced by officers designated by Titan. On August 31, 2017, the Company changed its name from “Minn Shares Inc.” to “EVO Transportation & Energy Services, Inc.” 1 Following the November 2016 public shell reverse merger transaction, the Company’s primary strategy was to seek growth through acquisitions. The Company completed the following acquisitions subsequent to November 2016: •On February 1, 2017, the Company acquired Environmental Alternative Fuels, LLC and its wholly owned subsidiary, EVO CNG, LLC. EVO CNG, LLC is engaged in the business of operating compressed natural gas fueling stations. •On June 1, 2018, the Company acquired Thunder Ridge Transport, Inc. (“Thunder Ridge”). Thunder Ridge is based in Springfield, Missouri and is engaged in the business of fulfilling government contracts for freight trucking services, as well as providing freight trucking services to non-government entities. •On November 16, 2018, the Company acquired W.E. Graham, Inc., a trucking company based in Memphis, Tennessee engaged in the business of fulfilling government contracts for freight trucking services. •On January 2, 2019, the Company acquired Sheehy Mail, Inc. (“Sheehy”). Sheehy is based in Waterloo, Wisconsin and is engaged in the business of fulfilling government contracts for freight trucking services, as well as providing freight trucking services to non-government entities. •On February 1, 2019, the Company acquired Ursa Major Corporation (“Ursa”) and J.B. Lease Corporation (“JB Lease”). Ursa and JB Lease are based in Oak Creek, Wisconsin and are engaged in the business of fulfilling government contracts for freight trucking services, as well as providing freight trucking services to non-government entities. •On July 15, 2019, the Company acquired Courtlandt and Brown Enterprises L.L.C. (“Courtlandt”) and Finkle Transport Inc. (“Finkle”). Finkle and Courtlandt are based in Newark, New Jersey and are engaged in the business of fulfilling government contracts for freight trucking services, as well as providing freight trucking services to non-government entities. •On September 16, 2019, the Company, through its wholly-owned subsidiary EVO Holding Company, LLC, acquired John W. Ritter, Inc. (“JWR”), Ritter Transportation Systems, Inc. (“Ritter Transportation”), Ritter Transport, Inc. (“Ritter Transport”), and Johmar Leasing Company, LLC (“Johmar,” and together with JWR, Ritter Transportation, and Ritter Transport, the “Ritter Companies”). The Ritter Companies are based in Laurel, Maryland and are engaged in the business of fulfilling government contracts for freight trucking services, as well as providing freight trucking services to non-government entities. Strategy In 2014, the USPS announced that it intends to significantly reduce its supplier base from over 4,000 surface transportation contractors to less than 1,000 by 2022. As part of this consolidation effort, the USPS began implementing the Dynamic Route Optimization (“DRO”) program and consolidating contracts, which is designed to manage fewer relationships and work with larger prime contractors. Although the DRO program has evolved since its announcement and now operates more like traditional static USPS contracts, we expect additional USPS contracts to come available in the next several years as the USPS continues to consolidate contracts. We believe EVO is well positioned to take on more business with the USPS as the postal service consolidates vendors and solicits larger contracts for which bigger suppliers are better equipped to bid. We have a dedicated team focused on bidding on new contracts and responding to any inquiries from the USPS on existing contracts. We believe we have an industry-leading ability to provide the USPS with the information and service levels they desire as we bid on new contracts, and we intend to continue to expand both organically and through acquisitions to provide greater coverage to the USPS. We believe we have an industry-leading ability to provide the USPS with the information and service levels they desire as we bid on new contracts. We have invested meaningfully in information systems and personnel which we believe will allow us to be effective in managing DRO/consolidation and other USPS contracts. For example, continuing implementation of a transportation management system has allowed us to meet the scheduling and reporting needs of the USPS under its DRO and other programs. For example, continuing implementation of a transportation management system has allowed us to meet the scheduling and reporting needs of the USPS under its DRO and other programs. Our acquisitive growth strategy has also enabled us to achieve a greater scale than many of our regional and local competitors, which gives us the ability to competitively bid on a high percentage of available contracts. Our acquisitive growth strategy has also enabled us to achieve a greater scale than many of our regional and local competitors, which gives us the ability to competitively bid on a high percentage of available contracts. Our largest customer, the USPS, adopted a robust environmental sustainability plan that includes a stated commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions through increased procurement of services from alternative fuels carriers. We have a dedicated focus on reducing emissions through operating routes as efficiently as possible as well as by operating vehicles on CNG. In addition, in certain markets we fuel our vehicles at one of our three operating CNG stations that serve other customers as well. We intend to continue to acquire additional vehicles powered by alternative fuels, including electrically powered 2 vehicles. We believe our shared commitment with the USPS to reducing emissions positions the Company to grow our business relationship with the USPS in the future. We intend to leverage our infrastructure to serve additional customers beyond the USPS. By utilizing our technology platform, network of terminals, and in some cases an ability to offer freight products with similar next day options, we are able to offer transportation services to corporate customers at competitive rates while also improving margins. We will continue to invest in our technology solutions in order to offer industry-leading service to our customers. We also plan to continue our focus on sustainable operations, both by continuing to utilize our company owned CNG stations and developing transit lanes utilizing CNG trucks near our CNG stations and by acquiring additional vehicles powered by alternative fuels, including electrically powered vehicles. Since January 2019, we completed the acquisition of Sheehy of Waterloo, Wisconsin, which operates the largest fleet of CNG trucks servicing the USPS. We also completed the acquisition of Ursa in 2019, which is based one mile from our Oak Creek CNG station. Market Overview Competition The U.S. mail surface transportation industry is estimated to represent an approximately $5 billion subset of the broader transportation market. The USPS trucking industry is highly competitive and fragmented. In 2014, the USPS had active contracts with over 4,000 transportation contractors, and it publicly announced its goal to reduce that number to below 1,000 by 2022. Although the DRO program has evolved since its announcement and now operates more like traditional static USPS contracts, we expect additional USPS contracts to come available in the next several years as the USPS continues to consolidate contracts. The Company competes primarily with other transportation companies for contracts with the USPS. We also compete with other motor carriers for the services of drivers, independent contractors and management employees. Our largest customer, the USPS, typically awards its contracts competitively and often renews contracts with incumbent service providers if appropriate services have been performed. The Company believes that the principal differentiating factors in its business, relative to competition, are service, efficiency, pricing, and its focus on alternative fuels, which aligns with the USPS’s stated preference for contractors who prioritize alternative energy options. Additionally, the Company was an early adopter of the DRO program with the USPS. We believe our existing relationship with the USPS and experience with the DRO program provide the Company an additional competitive advantage when bidding on these contracts. Our Target Customers The USPS is our primary target customer, but we also seek to provide freight trucking and brokerage services to various corporate customers. Principal Customers and Suppliers The USPS is the Company’s primary customer, and for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, the USPS accounted for approximately 89% and 87%, respectively, of the Company’s revenue. As a result, the Company’s trucking operations are highly dependent on the USPS. For a discussion of the risks associated with the possible loss of the USPS as a customer or a significant reduction in the Company’s relationship with the USPS, refer to Item 1A. Risk Factors of this report. Safety and Risk Management The Company considers Safety, Risk and Regulatory compliance to be a key focus of all operations. Through this focus, the Company is consistently identifying risks, developing a proactive approach to improving overall Safety performance and reducing employee injuries. Of the many tools used by the company, items such as on-board cameras, trucks equipped with accident-avoidance devices, and training on defensive driving continue to be effective in reducing vehicle accidents and injuries. Of the many tools used by the company, items such as On-Board Cameras, trucks equipped with accident-avoidance devices, and training on Defensive Driving continue to be effective in reducing vehicle accidents and injuries. Because the Company’s primary business is transportation on public roadways, we are regulated by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), a division of the US Department of Transportation (DOT), and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Because the Company’s primary business is transportation on public roadways, they are regulated by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), a division of the US Department of Transportation (DOT), and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The Company operates its business to exceed the requirements of these agencies, and currently maintains a Satisfactory rating with the FMCSA. The primary safety related risks associated with the transportation industry consist of damage to Company equipment or third parties involved in a vehicle accident, personal injury to others involved in an accident, and injuries sustained to employees. 3 The primary safety related risks associated with the transportation industry consist of damage to Company equipment or third parties involved in a vehicle accident, personal injury to others involved in an accident, and injuries sustained to employees. 3 The Company maintains insurance coverage for all operations to exceed the requirements of the FMCSA, and consistently reviews its coverage on an annual basis. The Company maintains insurance coverage for all operations to exceed the requirements of the FMCSA, and consistently reviews said coverage on an annual basis. To the extent that the Company subcontracts any portion of its business to third party trucking companies, those companies operate under their own DOT authority, and provide their own liability and workers compensation insurance, which the Company has the right to audit from time to time. To the extent that the Company subcontracts any portion of its business to third party trucking company, those companies operate under their own DOT authority, and provide their own liability and workers compensation insurance which Company has the right to audit from time to time. All third-party trucking companies contracted with the Company must meet the Company's insurance requirements and safety requirements by being rated as Satisfactory by the FMCSA. All third-party trucking companies contracted with Company must meet the insurance requirements and meet the Safety requirements by being rated as Satisfactory by the FMCSA. All third-party trucking companies must also list the Company as additional insured on all insurance policies and contain a Waiver of Subrogation on their workers compensation policy. All third-party trucking companies must also list Company as additional insured on all insurance policies and contain a Waiver of Subrogation on their workers compensation policy. Fuel In 2021, we used approximately 7.75 million gallons of diesel and approximately 1.35 million gas gallon equivalents (“GGEs”) of CNG. Our fuel costs are typically passed on to customers. In addition, we qualified for a retroactive tax credit of $0.50 per GGE for roughly 0.50 per GGE for the roughly 1. 7 million of the GGEs utilized in 2021 and a tax credit of $0.30 per GGE for the remaining approximately 0.635 million GGES utilized in 2021. These tax credits expired on December 31, 2021. The Company actively manages its fuel purchasing network in an effort to maintain adequate fuel supplies and reduce its fuel costs. The Company purchases its fuel through a network of retail truck stops with which it has negotiated volume purchasing discounts. The Company seeks to reduce its fuel costs by routing its drivers to truck stops with which the Company has negotiated volume purchase discounts when fuel prices at such stops are lower than the bulk rate paid for fuel at the Company’s terminals. The Company stores fuel in aboveground storage tanks at some of its facilities. The Company stores fuel in aboveground and underground storage tanks at some of its facilities. The Company believes the most effective protection against fuel cost increases is to maintain a fuel-efficient fleet by incorporating fuel efficiency measures and focusing on alternative fuel vehicles, particularly CNG vehicles that can leverage the Company’s current and future CNG fueling stations. The Company may periodically enter into various commodity hedging instruments to mitigate a portion of the effect of fuel price fluctuations. As of December 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company had no liabilities related to commodity hedging instruments recorded in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. Shortages of fuel, increases in fuel prices, or rationing of petroleum products could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s operations and profitability. Operations Fleet We operate a substantial fleet of tractors, trailers, straight trucks, and local delivery vehicles. We own a significant portion of our fleet, but we also utilize leases and short-term rental agreements for some of our vehicles and trailers. We own the vast majority of our fleet, but we also utilize leases and short-term rental agreements for some of our vehicles and trailers. Our vehicles currently operate on either diesel fuel or CNG, and we are also pursuing opportunities to introduce other alternative fuel vehicles, including electric vehicles, into our fleet. Our vehicles currently operate on either diesel fuel or CNG, and we are also pursuing opportunities to introduce other alternative fuel vehicles, including electric vehicles, into our fleet. We intend to continue to replace our existing fleet with more efficient diesel, CNG and other alternative fuel vehicles. Operations Centers We manage regional operations centers with major centers of operations in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, Austin, Texas, Laurel, Maryland, and Newark, New Jersey. Other operations centers include Des Moines, Iowa, Columbus, Ohio, St. Louis, Missouri, Madison, Wisconsin, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Technology We utilize a suite of systems for transportation management, electronic logging, customer relationship management, brokerage, maintenance, accounting, recruiting, HR, payroll and camera systems. These systems include Omnitracs, Salesforce, NetSuite, Ten Street, APlus, Lytx, and others. These systems include Omnitracs, Salesforce, NetSuite, Ten Street, APlus, Lytx, and others We expect these systems to provide increased operational efficiencies and revenue maximization. We expect these systems to provide increased operational efficiencies and revenue maximization. Seasonality Due to seasonal increases in USPS volume, the Company’s truck utilization and revenue typically increase during the last quarter of each calendar year. Correspondingly, operating expenses increase, fuel efficiency declines because of engine idling, and harsh weather creates higher accident frequency, increased claims, and higher equipment repair expenditures. 4 Government Regulation and Environmental Matters The Company’s operations are regulated and licensed by various federal, state, and local government agencies. The Company and its drivers must comply with the safety and fitness regulations of the DOT and the agencies within the states that regulate transportation, including those regulations relating to operating authority, safety, drug- and alcohol-testing, hours-of-service, hazardous materials transportation, financial reporting, testing and specification of equipment, and product-handling requirements. Weight and equipment dimensions also are subject to government regulations. The Company also may become subject to new or more restrictive regulations relating to fuel emissions, environmental protection, drivers’ hours-of-service, driver eligibility requirements, on-board reporting of operations, collective bargaining, ergonomics and other matters affecting safety, insurance and operating methods. Other agencies, such as the United States Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) and the United States Department of Homeland Security (“DHS”), also regulate the Company’s equipment, operations, drivers and the environment. The DOT, through the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (“FMCSA”), imposes safety and fitness regulations on the Company and its drivers, including rules that restrict driver hours-of-service. The FMCSA has adopted a data-driven Compliance, Safety and Accountability (the “CSA”) program as its safety enforcement and compliance model. The CSA program holds motor carries and drivers accountable for their role in safety by evaluating and ranking fleets and individual drivers on certain safety-related standards. To promote improvement in all CSA categories, including those both over and under the established scoring threshold, the Company has procedures in place to address areas where it has exceeded the thresholds and the Company periodically reviews all safety-related policies, programs and procedures for their effectiveness and revises them, as necessary, to establish improvement. The Company believes its established policies, programs and procedures are adequate to address safety-related concerns but can give no assurance these measures will be effective. The FMCSA issues three categories of safety ratings: satisfactory, conditional, and unsatisfactory. All operating authorities granted by the DOT that are operated by the Company currently have a “satisfactory” FMCSA rating. The Company is also subject to various labor laws and regulations. The contracts that the Company holds with USPS are subject to the McNamara-O’Hara Service Contract Act (“SCA”) that is administered by the Department of Labor. The SCA, among other things, requires that the Company pay its drivers a minimum hourly wage as determined by the DOL as well as provide a bona fide fringe benefit package to its drivers. The Company is also subject to various environmental laws and regulations governing, among other matters, the operation of fuel storage tanks, release of emissions from its vehicles (including engine idling) and facilities, and adverse impacts to the environment, including to the soil, groundwater and surface water. The Company has implemented programs designed to monitor and address identified environmental risks. Historically, the Company’s environmental compliance costs have not had a material adverse effect on its results of operations. Employees As of December 31, 2021, the Company had approximately 1,744 employees, consisting of approximately 1,272 full-time employees and approximately 472 part-time employees. Employees As of December 31, 2020, the Company had approximately 1,600 employees, consisting of approximately 1,100 full-time employees and approximately 500 part-time employees. The Company employed approximately 1,494 drivers as of December 31, 2021. The Company employed approximately 1,400 drivers as of December 31, 2020. The Company is not a party to any collective bargaining agreements. Company Website The Company’s website may be accessed at www.evotransinc.com. All of our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission can be accessed free of charge through our website as soon as reasonably practicable after filing. All of our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission can be accessed free of charge through our website as soon as reasonably practicable after filing.

This includes annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports filed or furnished on Form 8-K and all related amendments. Item 1A. Risk Factors. Risks Related to the Company If we do not obtain sufficient additional capital or generate substantial revenue, we may be unable to pursue our objectives. This raises substantial doubt related to our ability to continue as a going concern. As disclosed in the notes to our consolidated financial statements included in this report, numerous factors raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. Specific factors include the following: •our historical operating losses, net losses and cash used in operations; 5 •continued net losses during 2020, as well as during 2021 after excluding the nonrecurring revenue that resulted from the USPS settlement agreements and the nonrecurring gains that resulted from the extinguishment of certain debt obligations; •continued cash used in operations during 2020, as well as during 2021 after excluding the nonrecurring cash receipts that resulted from the USPS settlement agreements; •continued working capital deficit and stockholders’ deficit as of March 31, 2022; •the structure of our factoring arrangement; and •existing defaults on certain of our debt obligations; and uncertainty regarding our ability to obtain additional financing in the future. If we are unable to improve our liquidity position, we might be unable to continue as a going concern. This could significantly reduce or eliminate the value of our investors’ investment in the Company. The Company’s level of indebtedness could adversely affect its financial condition and its ability to fulfill its obligations and operate its business. The Company has incurred significant liabilities, and the Company’s ongoing capital needs are extensive relative to its current cash position. Unless the Company is able to restructure some or all of its outstanding debt and/or raise sufficient capital to fund its continued operations and its debt obligations, the Company will be unable to pay these obligations as they become due. The Company has been unable to pay its obligations under its liabilities as they have become due in the past. The Company is heavily reliant on its factoring arrangement, and any reductions to the Company’s ability to obtain credit under its factoring arrangement could significantly impact the Company’s liquidity. The Company obtains liquidity under an accounts receivable factoring arrangement with a financial institution (the “Factor”). Pursuant to the terms of the agreement, the Company, from time to time, sells to the Factor certain of its accounts receivable balances on a recourse basis for approved accounts. The Factor may also advance payment, in its discretion, for unearned future contract amounts. The Factor remits 95% of the purchased accounts receivable balance and accepted unearned future contract amounts for a given month to the Company (the “Advance Amount”) with the remaining balance, less fees, to be forwarded once the Factor collects the full accounts receivable balance or unearned future contract amount, as applicable, from the customer. This is one of our primary sources of liquidity. The Factor has no obligation to purchase the full amount of accounts receivable balances or unearned future contract amounts that the Company offers to sell, and there can be no assurance that the Factor will continue to purchase accounts receivable or unearned future contract amounts at the same levels as it has in the past. If the Factor determines in its sole discretion to decrease the amount it advances under the factoring arrangement or to terminate the factoring agreement entirely and we are unable to obtain a replacement source of credit on substantially similar terms, it would significantly decrease the Company’s liquidity, which would likely have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition. We have a limited operating history on which to base an investment decision. EVO did not begin trucking operations until June 2018. Thus, we are subject to all the risks associated with any business enterprise with a limited operating history. Our prospects must be considered in light of the risks, expenses and difficulties frequently encountered by companies in their early stages of operation. When evaluating our business and prospects, you must consider the risks, expenses and difficulties that we may encounter as a company that acquired substantially all of its operations in the past three years. We will need substantial additional capital to fund our growth plans and operate our business. We require substantial additional capital to fund our capital expenditures and debt service to achieve profitability and to otherwise execute on our business plan. The most likely sources of such additional capital include private placements and public offerings of shares of our capital stock, including shares of our common stock or securities convertible into or exchangeable for our common stock, debt financing or funds from potential strategic transactions. We may seek additional capital from available sources, which may include hedge funds, private equity funds, venture capitalists, lenders/banks and other financial institutions, as well as additional private placements. Any financings in which we sell shares of our capital stock will likely be dilutive to our current stockholders. If we raise additional capital by incurring debt, a portion of our cash flow would have to be dedicated to the payment of principal and interest on such indebtedness. In addition, typical loan agreements also might contain restrictive covenants that may impair our operating flexibility. Such loan agreements, loans, or debentures would also provide for default under certain circumstances, such as failure to meet certain financial covenants. A default under a loan agreement could result in the loan becoming immediately due and payable and, if unpaid, a judgment in favor of such 6 lender which would be senior to the rights of our stockholders. A default under a loan agreement could result in the loan becoming immediately due and payable and, if unpaid, a judgment in favor of such lender which would be senior to the rights of our stockholders. A judgment creditor would have the right to foreclose on any of our assets resulting in a material adverse effect on our business, operating results or financial condition. Our ability to raise additional capital may depend in part on our success in meeting sales and operating goals. We currently have no committed sources of additional capital and there is no assurance that additional financing will be available in the amounts or at the times required, or if it is, on terms acceptable or favorable to us. We currently have no committed sources of additional capital and there is no assurance that additional financing will be available in the 6 amounts or at the times required, or if it is, on terms acceptable or favorable to us. If we are unable to obtain additional financing when and if needed, our business will be materially impacted and our investors may lose the value of their entire investment. Potential inquiries into or audits of our Paycheck Protection Program loan, as well as the results of any such inquiries or audits, could have a significant adverse effect on us and our financial condition. We applied for and received a $10 million Paycheck Protection Program ("PPP") loan under the CARES Act. On May 8, 2020, we received a letter from the Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis of the U.S. House of Representatives demanding that we return the PPP loan. We elected not to return the PPP loan proceeds as requested and our PPP loan was subsequently forgiven. We elected not to return the PPP loan proceeds as requested and our PPP loan was subsequently forgiven. Also, the United States Small Business Administration ("SBA") has stated that it intends to audit the PPP loan application of any company, like us, that received PPP loan proceeds of more than $2 million. Our decision to retain the PPP loan may require members of our management team to devote attention to future correspondence and requests from the Select Subcommittee, the SBA, or other regulators, which would reduce the amount of time available to management to focus on our operations and strategic initiatives. If we are later determined to have violated any of the laws or governmental regulations that apply to us in connection with the PPP loan, or it is otherwise determined that we were ineligible to receive the PPP loan, we may be subject to penalties, including significant civil, criminal and administrative penalties. We have a history of losses and may incur additional losses in the future. In 2021, we reported net income of $14.3 million that included $34.8 million and $32. 8 million of nonrecurring pre-tax revenue resulting from the USPS settlement agreements, as well as a $11.0 million pre-tax gain on the extinguishment of certain debt obligations. In 2020, we incurred a net loss of $46.8 million.8 million and $32. We may continue to incur losses, the amount of our losses may increase, and we may never achieve or sustain profitability, any of which would adversely affect our business, prospects and financial condition and may cause the price of our common stock to fall. In addition, to try to achieve or sustain profitability, we may take actions that result in material costs or material asset or goodwill impairments. We may experience impairment of our long-lived assets and our goodwill. Long-lived assets, including property, plant and equipment, are tested for impairment whenever circumstances indicate that the carrying value of these assets may not be recoverable. Long-lived assets are considered impaired if the carrying value of the asset exceeds the sum of the future expected undiscounted cash flows to be derived from the asset. We also periodically evaluate our goodwill for potential impairment. When we perform the quantitative goodwill impairment test, we compare the fair value of the reporting unit to the carrying value, which includes goodwill. If the carrying value is higher than the fair value, the goodwill is considered impaired. Once an asset is considered impaired, an impairment loss is recorded within operating expense for the difference between the asset’s carrying value and its fair value. For assets held and used in the business, management generally determines fair value using estimated future cash flows to be derived from the asset, discounted to a net present value using an appropriate discount rate. For assets held for sale or for investment purposes, management determines fair value by estimating the proceeds to be received upon sale of the asset, less disposition costs. We may incur significant costs to comply with public company reporting requirements and other costs associated with being a public company. We may incur significant costs associated with our public company reporting requirements and other rules implemented by the Securities and Exchange Commission. We expect all of these applicable rules and regulations to increase our legal and financial compliance costs and to make some activities more time-consuming and costlier. As a public company, we are required to comply with rules and regulations of the SEC, including expanded disclosure and more complex accounting rules. We will need to implement additional finance and accounting systems, procedures and controls to satisfy these reporting requirements. In addition, we may need to hire additional legal and accounting staff to enable us to comply with these reporting requirements. These costs could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and limit our ability to realize our objectives. We may not be able to meet the internal control reporting requirements imposed by the SEC. As directed by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the SEC adopted rules requiring each public company to include a report of management on the company’s internal controls over financial reporting in its annual reports. While we expect to expend significant resources in developing the necessary documentation and testing procedures required by Section 404 of the 7 Sarbanes-Oxley Act, there is a risk that we may not be able to comply timely with all of the requirements imposed by this rule. While we expect to expend significant resources in developing the necessary documentation and testing procedures required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, there is a risk that we may not be able to comply timely with all of the requirements imposed by this rule. If we are unable to timely comply with all of these requirements, potential investors might deem our financial statements to be unreliable and our ability to obtain additional capital could suffer. We have identified seven material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting and may identify additional material weaknesses in the future or otherwise fail to maintain an effective system of internal control, which may result in material misstatements of our financial statements or cause us to fail to meet our periodic reporting obligations. The Company identified seven deficiencies in internal control that it considered to be material weaknesses and other deficiencies that it considered to be significant deficiencies. 7 The Company identified seven deficiencies in internal control that it considered to be material weaknesses and other deficiencies that it considered to be significant deficiencies. A deficiency in internal control exists when the design or operation of a control does not allow management or employees, in the normal course of performing their assigned functions, to prevent or detect and correct misstatements on a timely basis. A material weakness is a deficiency, or combination of deficiencies in internal controls, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the entity’s financial statements will not be prevented, or detected and corrected on a timely basis. A significant deficiency is a deficiency, or combination of deficiencies in internal control that is less severe than a material weakness, yet important enough to merit attention by those charged with governance.

In addition, the Company’s management has concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of December 31, 2021 due to the material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting described in Item 9A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. As a result, we will be required to expend significant resources to develop the necessary documentation and testing procedures required by Section 404, and there is a risk that we will not comply with all of the necessary requirements. The material weaknesses may result in material misstatements of our financial statements or cause us to fail to meet our periodic reporting obligations. Additionally, if we cannot remediate the material weaknesses in internal controls or if we identify additional material weaknesses in internal controls that cannot be remediated in a timely manner, investors and others with whom we do business may lose confidence in the reliability of our financial statements, and in our ability to obtain equity or debt financing could suffer. We partially funded the construction of certain of our fueling stations using grant funds that we are required to repay if we do not satisfy certain operational metrics. EVO CNG, LLC received grants in the amounts of $0.4 million and $0.1 million to assist in the construction and equipping of our San Antonio and Fort Worth fueling stations, respectively. The grants must be repaid if EVO CNG, LLC sells, transfers, destroys or otherwise loses title, possession, ownership or control of the equipment funded with the grants during the terms of the respective grant agreements. Our San Antonio fueling station is not operating, which might increase the risk that we will lose title, possession, ownership or control of the equipment at that station and that we will be required to repay the grant we received related to that station. We depend on certain key personnel, and our operating performance may be adversely impacted by the loss of any such key personnel. Our ability to execute our business plans and objectives depends, in large part, on our ability to attract and retain qualified personnel. Competition for personnel is intense and there can be no assurance that we will be able to attract and retain personnel. In particular, we are dependent upon the services of our management team. Our inability to utilize the services of our management team members could have an adverse effect on us and there would likely be a difficult transition period in finding replacements for any of them. The execution of our strategic plan will place increasing demands on our management and operations. If we lose or are unable to obtain the services of key personnel, our ability to manage our business and implement our strategic plan could be delayed or hindered, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. We are controlled by our current executive officers, directors and principal stockholders. Our executive officers, directors and principal stockholders beneficially own a substantial majority of our outstanding common stock. Accordingly, our executive officers, directors and principal stockholders will have the ability to exert substantial influence over our business affairs, including electing directors, appointing officers, determining officers’ compensation, issuing additional equity securities or incurring additional debt, effecting or preventing a merger, sale of assets or other corporate transaction and amending our articles of incorporation. We may not successfully manage our recent and planned growth. We have expanded our business through acquiring additional companies that provide contract trucking services to the USPS and leveraging our expanded operations to bid on additional USPS trucking contracts. We plan to continue to expand through acquisitions, bidding on additional USPS trucking contracts, and expanding both our freight and brokerage operations in the 8 future. We plan to continue to expand through acquisitions, bidding on additional USPS trucking contracts, and expanding both our freight and brokerage operations in the future. Any expansion of operations we have undertaken or may undertake entail and will entail risks and such actions may involve specific operational activities that may negatively impact our profitability. Consequently, investors must assume the risk that (i) such expansion may ultimately involve expenditures of funds beyond the resources available to us at that time, and (ii) management of such expanded operations may divert management’s attention and resources away from its existing operations. These factors may have a material adverse effect on our present and prospective business activities. Risks Related to the Company’s Operations The Company derives substantially all of its revenue from one customer, the loss of which would have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business. 8 Risks Related to the Company’s Operations The Company derives substantially all of its revenue from one customer, the loss of which would have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business. Substantially all of the Company’s revenue is generated from the USPS, the loss or reduction of which would have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business. Economic conditions may adversely affect the USPS and its ability to remain solvent. The United States Government Accountability Office described the USPS’s financial condition as “deteriorating and unsustainable” and reported that the USPS lost approximately $69 billion from fiscal years 2007 through 2018. The USPS’s financial difficulties can negatively impact the Company’s results of operations and financial condition and the Company’s ability to comply with the covenants in its debt agreements, especially if the USPS were to delay or default on payments to us. There can be no assurance that the Company’s relationship with the USPS will continue as presently in effect. Additionally, the Company’s contracts with the USPS are terminable for convenience by the USPS upon advance notice ranging from 60 days for some contracts to 180 days for DRO contracts. The Company’s contracts with the USPS are terminable for convenience by the USPS upon advance notice ranging from 60 days for some contracts to 180 days for DRO contracts. A default in performance by the Company under one USPS contract can constitute a cross-default allowing the USPS to terminate some or all of the Company’s other contracts with the USPS. A reduction in, or termination of, the Company’s services by the USPS would have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business and operating results. The Company has significant ongoing capital expenditure requirements. If the Company is unable to obtain additional capital on favorable terms or at all, it may not be able to execute on its business plans and its business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and prospects may be adversely affected. The Company’s business is capital intensive. Its capital expenditures focus primarily on equipment replacement and, to a lesser extent, facilities, equipment growth, and investments in information technology. The Company also expects to devote substantial financial resources to grow its operations and fund its acquisition activities. As a result of the Company’s funding requirements, it likely will need to raise funds through the sale of additional equity or debt securities or seek additional financing through other arrangements to increase its cash resources. Any sale of additional equity or debt securities may result in dilution to its stockholders. Public or private financing may not be available in amounts or on terms acceptable to the Company, if at all. If the Company is unable to obtain additional financing, it may be required to delay, reduce the scope of, or eliminate future acquisition activities or growth initiatives, which could adversely affect its business, financial condition and operating results. In such case, the Company may also operate its equipment (including tractors and trailers) for longer periods, which would result in increased maintenance costs, which would in turn reduce its operating income. The Company’s trucking business is affected by general economic and business risks that are largely beyond its control. The Company’s trucking business is cyclical and is dependent on a number of factors, many of which are beyond our control. The Company believes that some of the most significant of these factors are economic changes that affect supply and demand in transportation markets in general, including excess tractor capacity in comparison with shipping demand and recessionary economic cycles. The Company also is subject to cost increases outside of its control that could materially reduce its profitability if it is unable to increase its rates sufficiently. Such cost increases include, but are not limited to, increases in fuel prices, driver wages, subcontractor rates, interest rates, taxes, tolls, license and registration fees, insurance, equipment and healthcare for its employees. Such cost increases include, but are not limited to, increases in fuel prices, driver wages, owner-operator contracted rates, interest rates, taxes, tolls, license and registration fees, insurance, equipment and healthcare for its employees. The Company’s suppliers’ business levels also may be negatively affected by adverse economic conditions or financial constraints, which could lead to disruptions in the supply and availability of equipment, parts and services critical to its operations. A significant interruption in the Company’s normal supply chain could disrupt its operations, increase its costs and negatively impact its ability to serve its customers. 9 In addition, events outside the Company’s control, such as strikes or other work stoppages at its facilities or at customer, port, border or other shipping locations, or actual or threatened armed conflicts or terrorist attacks, efforts to combat terrorism, military action against a foreign state or group located in a foreign state, or heightened security requirements could lead to reduced economic demand, reduced availability of credit or temporary closing of the shipping locations or United States borders. In addition, events outside the Company’s control, such as strikes or other work stoppages at its facilities or at customer, port, border or other shipping locations, or actual or threatened armed conflicts or terrorist attacks, efforts to combat terrorism, military action against a foreign state or group located in a foreign state, or heightened security requirements could lead to reduced economic demand, reduced availability of credit or temporary closing of the shipping locations or United States borders. Such events or enhanced security measures in connection with such events could impair the Company’s operating efficiency and productivity and result in higher operating costs. The trucking industry is highly competitive and fragmented, and the Company’s business and results of operations may suffer if it is unable to adequately address downward pricing and other competitive pressures. 9 The trucking industry is highly competitive and fragmented, and the Company’s business and results of operations may suffer if it is unable to adequately address downward pricing and other competitive pressures. The Company competes with many truckload carriers of varying sizes, including some that may have greater access to equipment, a wider range of services, greater capital resources, less indebtedness or other competitive advantages. The Company also competes with smaller, regional service providers that cover specific shipping lanes or that offer niche services. Numerous competitive factors could impair the Company’s ability to maintain or improve its profitability. These factors include the following: •many of the Company’s competitors periodically reduce their freight rates to gain business, especially during times of reduced growth in the economy, which may limit the Company’s ability to maintain or increase freight rates, may require the Company to reduce its freight rates or may limit its ability to maintain or expand its business; •some shippers, including the USPS, have reduced or may reduce the number of carriers they use by selecting core carriers as approved service providers and in some instances the Company may not be selected; •many customers, including the USPS, periodically solicit bids from multiple carriers for their shipping needs, which may depress freight rates or result in a loss of business to competitors; •the continuing trend toward consolidation in the trucking industry may result in more large carriers with greater financial resources and other competitive advantages, and the Company may have difficulty competing with them; •advances in technology may require the Company to increase investments in order to remain competitive, and its customers may not be willing to accept higher freight rates to cover the cost of these investments; •the Company may have higher exposure to litigation risks as compared to smaller carriers; and •smaller carriers may build economies of scale with procurement aggregation providers, which may improve the smaller carriers’ abilities to compete with the Company. Driver shortages and increases in driver compensation could adversely affect the Company’s profitability and ability to maintain or grow its trucking business. Driver shortages could require the Company to spend more to attract and retain drivers. The market for qualified drivers is intensely competitive, which may subject the Company to increased payments for driver compensation. Also, because of the competition for drivers, the Company may face difficulty maintaining or increasing its number of drivers. Compliance and enforcement initiatives included in the CSA program implemented by the FMCSA and regulations of the DOT relating to driver time and safety and fitness could also reduce the availability of qualified drivers. In addition, the Company experiences regular driver turnover, which requires the Company to continually recruit a substantial number of drivers in order to operate existing equipment. If the Company is unable to continue to attract and retain a sufficient number of drivers, it could be required to operate with fewer trucks and face difficulty meeting customer demands or be forced to forego business that would otherwise be available to it, which could adversely affect its profitability and ability to maintain or grow its business. Increased prices for, or decreases in the availability of, new equipment and decreases in the value of used equipment could adversely affect the Company’s results of operations and cash flows. Investment in new equipment is a significant part of the Company’s annual capital expenditures, and the Company’s trucking business operates optimally with an available supply of tractors and trailers from equipment manufacturers to operate and grow its business. In recent years, manufacturers have raised the prices of new equipment significantly due to increased costs of materials and parts shortages. If new equipment prices increase more than anticipated, the Company could incur higher depreciation and rental expenses than anticipated. If the Company is unable to fully offset any such increases in expenses with freight rate increases and/or improved fuel economy, its results of operations and cash flows could be adversely affected. 10 The Company may also face difficulty in purchasing new equipment due to decreased supply. The Company may also face difficulty in purchasing new equipment due to decreased supply. From time to time, some original equipment manufacturers (OEM) of tractors and trailers may reduce their manufacturing output due to lower demand for their products in economic downturns or a shortage of component parts. Component suppliers may either reduce production or be unable to increase production to meet OEM demand, creating periodic difficulty for OEMs to react in a timely manner to increased demand for new equipment and/or increased demand for replacement components as economic conditions change. The COVID-19 pandemic and resulting supply chain disruptions have particularly limited OEMs' ability to satisfy demand. In those situations, the Company may face reduced supply levels and increased acquisition costs. An inability to continue to obtain an adequate supply of new tractors or trailers for its operations could have a material adverse effect on its business, results of operations and financial condition. During prolonged periods of decreased tonnage levels, the Company and other trucking companies may make strategic fleet reductions, which could result in an increase in the supply of used equipment. 10 During prolonged periods of decreased tonnage levels, the Company and other trucking companies may make strategic fleet reductions, which could result in an increase in the supply of used equipment. When the supply exceeds the demand for used equipment, the general market value of used equipment decreases. Used equipment prices are also subject to substantial fluctuations based on availability of financing and commodity prices for scrap metal. A depressed market for used equipment could require the Company to trade its equipment at depressed values or to record losses on disposal or an impairment of the carrying values of its equipment that is not protected by residual value arrangements. Trades at depressed values and decreases in proceeds under equipment disposals and impairment of the carrying values of its equipment could adversely affect its results of operations and financial condition. Seasonality and the impact of weather and other catastrophic events adversely affect the Company’s trucking operations and profitability. The Company’s tractor productivity decreases during the winter season because inclement weather impedes operations. At the same time, operating expenses increase due to, among other things, a decline in fuel efficiency because of engine idling and harsh weather that creates higher accident frequency, increased claims and higher equipment repair expenditures. The Company also may suffer from weather-related or other events, such as tornadoes, hurricanes, blizzards, ice storms, floods, fires, earthquakes and explosions, which may disrupt fuel supplies, increase fuel costs, disrupt freight shipments or routes, affect regional economies, destroy its assets or the assets of its customers or otherwise adversely affect the business or financial condition of its customers, any of which could adversely affect its results or make its results more volatile. The trucking industry is highly regulated and changes in existing laws or regulations, or liability under existing or future laws or regulations, could have a material adverse effect on its results of operations and profitability. The Company operates in the United States pursuant to operating authority granted by the DOT. The Company, as well as its company and leased labor drivers, must also comply with governmental regulations regarding safety, equipment, environmental protection and operating methods. Examples include regulation of equipment weight, equipment dimensions, fuel emissions, driver hours-of-service, driver eligibility requirements, and on-board reporting of operations. The Company may become subject to new or more restrictive regulations relating to such matters that may require changes in its operating practices, influence the demand for transportation services or require it to incur significant additional costs. Possible changes to laws and regulations include: •increasingly stringent environmental laws and regulations, including changes intended to address fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions that are attributed to climate change; •restrictions, taxes or other controls on emissions; •regulation specific to the energy market and logistics providers to the industry; •changes in the hours-of-service regulations, which govern the amount of time a driver may drive in any specific period; •driver and vehicle ELD requirements; •requirements leading to accelerated purchases of new tractors, trucks, or trailers; •mandatory limits on vehicle weight and size; •driver hiring restrictions; •increased bonding or insurance requirements; and •security requirements imposed by the DHS. From time to time, various legislative proposals are introduced, including proposals to increase federal, state or local taxes, including taxes on motor fuels and emissions, which may increase the Company’s or its third party providers’ operating costs, 11 require capital expenditures or adversely impact the recruitment of drivers. The Company also could lose revenue if its customers divert business from it because it has not complied with their sustainability requirements. Safety-related evaluations and rankings under the CSA program could adversely impact the Company’s relationships with its trucking customers and its ability to maintain or grow its fleet, each of which could have a material adverse effect on its results of operations and profitability. The Compliance, Safety and Accountability (the “CSA”) program includes compliance and enforcement initiatives designed to monitor and improve commercial motor vehicle safety by measuring the safety record of both the motor carrier and the driver. These measurements are scored and used by the FMCSA to identify potential safety risks and to direct enforcement action. The FMCSA issues three categories of safety ratings: satisfactory, conditional, and unsatisfactory. As of December 31, 2020, all DOT operating authority numbers operated by the Company currently have a “satisfactory” FMCSA rating. The Company’s CSA scores are dependent upon its safety and compliance experience, which could change at any time. In addition, the safety standards prescribed in the CSA program or the underlying methodology used by the FMCSA to determine a carrier’s safety rating could change and, as a result, the Company’s ability to maintain an acceptable score could be adversely impacted. If the FMCSA adopts rulemakings in the future that revise the methodology used to determine a carrier’s safety rating in a manner that incorporates more stringent standards, then the Company’s CSA scores could be adversely affected. If the Company receives an unacceptable CSA score, its relationships with customers could be damaged, which could result in a loss of business or otherwise adversely affect the Company. The CSA program affects drivers because their safety performance and compliance impact their safety records and, while working for a carrier, will impact their carrier’s safety record. The methodology for determining a carrier’s DOT safety rating relies upon implementation of Behavioral Analysis and Safety Improvement Categories (“BASIC”) applicable to the on-road safety performance of the carrier’s drivers and certain of those rating results are provided on the FMCSA’s Carrier Safety Measurement System website. As a result, certain current and potential drivers may no longer be eligible to drive for the Company, the Company’s fleet could be ranked poorly as compared to its peer firms, and the Company’s safety rating could be adversely impacted. The occurrence of future deficiencies could affect driver recruiting and retention by causing high-quality drivers to seek employment (in the case of company drivers) or contracts (in the case of third party drivers) with other carriers, or could cause the Company’s customers to direct their business away from the Company and to carriers with better fleet safety rankings, either of which would adversely affect the Company’s results of operations and productivity. Additionally, the Company may incur greater than expected expenses in its attempts to improve its scores as a result of poor rankings. Those carriers and drivers identified under the CSA program as exhibiting poor BASIC scores are prioritized for interventions, such as warning letters and roadside investigations, either of which may adversely affect the Company’s results of operations. The requirements of CSA could also shrink the trucking industry’s pool of drivers if drivers with unfavorable scores leave the industry. As a result, the costs to attract, train and retain qualified drivers could increase. A shortage of qualified drivers could also increase driver turnover, decrease asset utilization, limit growth and adversely impact the Company’s results of operations and profitability. The Company is subject to environmental and worker health and safety laws and regulations that may expose it to significant costs and liabilities and have a material adverse effect on its results of operations, competitive position and financial condition. The Company is subject to stringent and comprehensive federal, state, and local environmental and worker health and safety laws and regulations governing, among other matters, the operation of fuel storage tanks, release of emissions from its vehicles (including engine idling) and facilities, the health and safety of its workers in conducting operations, and adverse impacts to the environment. Under certain environmental laws, the Company could be subject to strict liability, without regard to fault or legality of conduct, for costs relating to contamination at facilities the Company owns or operates or previously owned or operated and at third-party sites where the Company disposed of waste, as well as costs associated with the clean-up of releases arising from accidents involving the Company’s vehicles. The Company often operates in industrial areas, where truck terminals and other industrial activities are located, and where soil, groundwater or other forms of environmental contamination have occurred from historical or recent releases and for which the Company may incur remedial or other environmental liabilities. The Company also maintains aboveground fuel storage tanks at some of its facilities and vehicle maintenance operations at certain of its facilities. The Company also maintains aboveground and underground bulk fuel storage tanks and fueling islands at some of its facilities and vehicle maintenance operations at certain of its facilities. The Company’s operations involve the risks of fuel spillage or seepage into the environment, environmental damage and unauthorized hazardous material spills, releases or disposal actions, among others. Increasing efforts to control air emissions, including greenhouse gases, may have an adverse effect on the Company. Federal and state lawmakers have implemented various climate-change initiatives and greenhouse gas regulations and may implement additional initiatives in the future, all of which could increase the cost of new tractors, impair productivity and increase the Company’s operating expenses. 12 Compliance with environmental laws and regulations may also increase the price of the Company’s equipment and otherwise affect the economics of the Company’s trucking business by requiring changes in operating practices or by influencing the demand for, or the costs of providing, transportation services. Compliance with environmental laws and regulations may also increase the price of the Company’s equipment and otherwise affect the economics of the Company’s trucking business by requiring changes in operating practices or by influencing the demand for, or the costs of providing, transportation services. For example, regulations issued by the EPA and various state agencies that require progressive reductions in exhaust emissions from diesel engines have resulted in higher prices for tractors and diesel engines and increased operating and maintenance costs. Also, in order to reduce exhaust emissions, some states and municipalities have begun to restrict the locations and amount of time where diesel-powered tractors, such as the Company’s, may idle. These restrictions could force the Company to alter its drivers’ behavior, purchase on-board power units that do not require the engine to idle or face a decrease in productivity. The Company is also subject to potentially stringent rulemaking related to sustainability practices, including conservation of resources by decreasing fuel consumption. This increased focus on sustainability practices may result in new regulations and/or customer requirements that could adversely impact the Company’s business. This increased focus 12 on sustainability practices may result in new regulations and/or customer requirements that could adversely impact the Company’s business. Historically, the Company’s environmental compliance costs have not had a material adverse effect on its results of operations; however, there can be no assurance that such costs will not be material in the future or that future compliance will not have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business and operating results. If the Company has operational spills or accidents or if it is found to be in violation of, or otherwise liable under, environmental or worker health or safety laws or regulations, the Company could incur significant costs and liabilities. Those costs and liabilities may include the assessment of sanctions, including administrative, civil and criminal penalties, the imposition of investigatory, remedial or corrective action obligations, the occurrence of delays in permitting or performance of projects, and the issuance of orders enjoining performance of some or all of the Company’s operations in a particular area. The occurrence of any one or more of these developments could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, competitive position and financial condition. Environmental and worker health and safety laws are becoming increasingly more stringent and there can be no assurances that compliance with, or liabilities under, existing or future environmental and worker health or safety laws or regulations will not have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows or prospects. Insurance and claims expenses could significantly reduce the Company’s profitability. The Company is exposed to claims related to cargo loss and damage, property damage, personal injury, workers’ compensation, group health and group dental. The Company has insurance coverage with third-party insurance carriers, but it assumes a significant portion of the risk associated with these claims due to its self-insured retention and deductibles, which can make its insurance and claims expense higher or more volatile. Additionally, the Company faces the risks of increasing premiums and collateral requirements and the risk of carriers or underwriters leaving the transportation sector, which may materially affect its insurance costs or make insurance more difficult to find, as well as increase its collateral requirements. The Company could experience increases in its insurance premiums in the future if it decides to increase its coverage or if its claims experience deteriorates. In addition, the Company is subject to changing conditions and pricing in the insurance marketplace and the cost or availability of various types of insurance may change dramatically in the future. If the Company’s insurance or claims expense increases, and the Company is unable to offset the increase with higher freight rates, its results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. The Company’s results of operations may also be materially and adversely affected if it experiences a claim in excess of its coverage limits, a claim for which coverage is not provided or a covered claim for which its insurance company fails to perform. Difficulty in obtaining goods and services from the Company’s vendors and suppliers could adversely affect the Company’s business. The Company is dependent upon its vendors and suppliers, including equipment manufacturers, for tractors, trailers and other products and materials. The Company believes that it has positive vendor and supplier relationships and is generally able to obtain favorable pricing and other terms from such parties. If the Company fails to maintain amenable relationships with its vendors and suppliers, or if its vendors and suppliers are unable to provide the products and materials the Company needs or undergo financial hardship, the Company could experience difficulty in obtaining needed goods and services, and subsequently, its business and operations could be adversely affected. The Company’s contractual agreements with its sub-contracted operators expose it to risks that it does not face with its company drivers. The Company relies, in part, upon independent sub-contractors to perform the services for which it contracts with customers. The Company’s reliance on sub-contractors creates numerous risks for the Company’s business. If the Company’s sub-contractors fail to meet the Company’s contractual obligations or otherwise fail to perform in a manner consistent with the Company’s requirements, the Company may be required to utilize alternative service providers at potentially higher prices or with some degree of disruption of the services that the Company provides to customers. If the Company fails to deliver on time, if its contractual obligations are not otherwise met, or if the costs of its services increase, then the Company’s profitability and customer relationships could be harmed. 13 The financial condition and operating costs of the Company’s sub-contractors are affected by conditions and events that are beyond the Company’s control and may also be beyond their control. The financial condition and operating costs of the Company’s sub-contractors are affected by conditions and events that are beyond the Company’s control and may also be beyond their control. Adverse changes in the financial condition of the Company’s sub-contractors or increases in their equipment or operating costs could cause them to seek higher revenues or to cease their business relationships with the Company. The prices the Company charges its customers could be impacted by such issues, which may in turn limit pricing flexibility with customers, resulting in fewer customer contracts and decreasing the Company’s revenues. Sub-contractors typically use tractors, trailers and other equipment bearing the Company’s trade names and trademarks. If one of the Company’s sub-contractors is subject to negative publicity, it could reflect on the Company and have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, brand and financial performance. If one of the Company’s sub-contractors is subject to negative publicity, it could reflect on the Company and have a material adverse 13 effect on the Company’s business, brand and financial performance. Under certain laws, the Company could also be subject to allegations of liability for the activities of its sub-contractors. Sub-contractors are third-party service providers, as compared to company drivers who are employed by the Company. As independent business owners, the Company’s sub-contractors may make business or personnel decisions that conflict with the Company’s best interests. As independent business owners, the Company’s sub-contractors may make business or personal decisions that conflict with the Company’s best interests. For example, if a load is unprofitable, route distance is too far from home or personal scheduling conflicts arise, a sub-contractor may deny loads of freight from time to time. In these circumstances, the Company must be able to timely deliver the freight in order to maintain relationships with customers. If the Company’s sub-contractors are deemed by regulators or judicial process to be employees, the Company’s business and results of operations could be adversely affected. Tax and other regulatory authorities have in the past sought to assert that sub-contractors in the trucking industry are employees rather than independent contractors. Taxing and other regulatory authorities and courts apply a variety of standards in their determination of independent contractor status. If the Company’s sub-contractors are determined to be its employees, it would incur additional exposure under federal and state tax, workers’ compensation, unemployment benefits, labor, employment, and tort laws, including for prior periods, as well as potential liability for employee benefits and tax withholdings. The Company is dependent on computer and communications systems, and a systems failure or data breach could cause a significant disruption to its business. The Company’s business depends on the efficient and uninterrupted operation of its computer and communications hardware systems and infrastructure. The Company currently maintains its computer systems at multiple locations, including several of its offices and terminals and third-party data centers, along with computer equipment at each of its terminals. The Company’s operations and those of its technology and communications service providers are vulnerable to interruption by fire, earthquake, power loss, telecommunications failure, terrorist attacks, internet failures, computer viruses, data breaches (including cyber-attacks or cyber intrusions over the internet, malware and the like) and other events generally beyond its control. Although the Company believes that it has robust information security procedures and other safeguards in place, as cyber threats continue to evolve, it may be required to expend additional resources to continue to enhance its information security measures and investigate and remediate any information security vulnerabilities. A significant cyber incident, including system failure, security breach, disruption by malware or other damage, could interrupt or delay the Company’s operations, damage its reputation, cause a loss of customers, agents or third party capacity providers, expose the Company to a risk of loss or litigation, or cause the Company to incur significant time and expense to remedy such an event, any of which could have a material adverse impact on its results of operations and financial position. If the Company’s employees were to unionize, the Company’s operating costs could increase and its ability to compete could be impaired. None of the Company’s employees are currently represented under a collective bargaining agreement; however, the Company always faces the risk that its employees will try to unionize. Further, Congress or one or more states could approve legislation and/or the National Labor Relations Board (the NLRB) could render decisions or implement rule changes that could significantly affect the Company’s business and its relationship with employees, including actions that could substantially liberalize the procedures for union organization. For example, in December 2014, the NLRB implemented a final rule amending the agency’s representation-case proceedings that govern the procedures for union representation. Pursuant to this amendment, union elections can now be held within 10 to 21 days after the union requests a vote, which makes it easier for unions to successfully organize all employees, in all industries. In addition, the Company can offer no assurance that the Department of Labor will not adopt new regulations or interpret existing regulations in a manner that would favor the agenda of unions. The Company believes the applicability of the SCA to Company employees reduces the likelihood of organizational activity. Any attempt to organize by the Company’s employees could result in increased legal and other associated costs and divert management attention, and if the Company entered into a collective bargaining agreement, the terms could negatively affect its costs, efficiency and ability to generate acceptable returns on the affected operations. In particular, the unionization of the 14 Company’s employees could have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and prospects because: •restrictive work rules could hamper the Company’s efforts to improve and sustain operating efficiency and could impair the Company’s service reputation and limit the Company’s ability to provide next-day services; •a strike or work stoppage could negatively impact the Company’s profitability and could damage customer and employee relationships; and •an election and bargaining process could divert management’s time and attention from the Company’s overall objectives and impose significant expenses. In particular, the unionization of the Company’s employees could have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and prospects because: •restrictive work rules could hamper the Company’s efforts to improve and sustain operating efficiency and could impair the Company’s service reputation and limit the Company’s ability to provide next-day services; •a strike or work stoppage could negatively impact the Company’s profitability and could damage customer and employee relationships; and •an election and bargaining process could divert management’s time and attention from the Company’s overall objectives and impose significant expenses. Higher health care costs and labor costs could adversely affect the Company’s financial condition and results of operations. 14 Higher health care costs and labor costs could adversely affect the Company’s financial condition and results of operations. With the passage in 2010 of the United States Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (the PPACA), the Company is required to provide health care benefits to all full-time employees that meet certain minimum requirements of coverage and affordability, or otherwise be subject to a payment per employee based on the affordability criteria set forth in the PPACA. Many of these requirements have been phased in over a period of time, with the majority of the most impactful provisions affecting the Company having begun in the second quarter of 2015. Additionally, some states and localities have passed state and local laws mandating the provision of certain levels of health benefits by some employers. The PPACA also requires individuals to obtain coverage or face individual penalties, so employees who are currently eligible but have elected not to participate in the Company’s health care plans may ultimately find it more advantageous to do so. It is also possible that by making changes or failing to make changes in the health care plans the Company offers it will have difficulty attracting and retaining employees, including drivers. The costs and other effects of these healthcare requirements may significantly increase the Company’s health care coverage costs and could materially adversely affect its financial condition and results of operations. The COVID-19 pandemic and other similar outbreaks may have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations in the future. The continued spread and impact of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) might materially negatively impact our future results of operations and financial condition. COVID-19 has created, and any other outbreaks of similar contagious diseases or other adverse public health developments could create, significant volatility, uncertainty and economic disruption. COVID-19 or another similar outbreak could negatively impact our business in numerous ways, including, but not limited to, the following: •our revenue may be reduced due to a decrease in demand for our services or the transportation markets in general as a result of the global economic downturn; •our operations may be disrupted or impaired if a significant portion of our drivers or other employees are unable to work due to illness; •we may experience a loss of business or increased costs resulting from supply chain disruptions and changing transportation needs caused by the nationwide emergency response to the pandemic; •we may experience workforce issues and incur severance payments as a result of adjusting our workforce to market conditions, and we may subsequently experience retention issues and driver shortages; •our management may be distracted as they are focused on mitigating the effects of COVID-19 on our business operations while protecting the health of our workforce, which has required, and will continue to require, a large investment of time and resources; and •we may be at greater risk for cybersecurity issues, as digital technologies may become more vulnerable and experience a higher rate of cyberattacks in the current and continuing environment of remote connectivity. The extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic impacts the Company will depend on numerous evolving factors and future developments that we are not able to predict, including: the geographic scope, severity, and duration of the pandemic; governmental, business and other actions in response to the pandemic (which could include limitations on the Company’s operations or mandates to provide services in a specified manner); the impact of the pandemic on economic activity; the response of the overall economy and the financial markets; expenses we have incurred and may incur in the future in connection with our response to the pandemic; the health of and the effect on our workforce and our ability to meet staffing needs; and the potential effects on our internal controls, including those over financial reporting, as a result of changes in working environments. In 2020, services the Company provides USPS were deemed “essential” such that the Company was required to continue operations during “lockdowns” and similar restrictive measures limiting business activity generally. In 2020, services the Company provides USPS were deemed “essential” such that the Company was required to continue operations during “lockdowns” and similar restrictive measures limiting business activity generally. 15 In response to the spread of COVID-19, we modified our business practices for the continued health and safety of our employees. In response to the spread of COVID-19, we have modified our business practices for the continued health and safety of our employees. Specifically, we implemented measures to enhance the sanitization process of the Company’s equipment and properties, increased the social distancing of our employees by working remotely where possible, and provided driving associates with personal protective equipment (PPE). Specifically, we have implemented measures to enhance the sanitization process of the Company’s equipment and properties, increased the social distancing of our employees by working remotely where possible, and provided driving associates with personal protective equipment (PPE). We may take further actions, or be required to take further actions, that are in the best interests of our employees in the future. The implementation of health and safety practices, including federal or state vaccine mandates and similar measures, could impact our productivity and costs, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. In addition, the focus on managing and mitigating the impacts of COVID-19 on our business may cause us to divert or delay the application of our resources toward existing or new initiatives or investments, which could have a material adverse impact on our results of operations.

To the extent the COVID-19 pandemic adversely affects our business and financial results, it may also exacerbate many of the other risks set forth in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including those relating to our financial performance and debt obligations. 15 To the extent the COVID-19 pandemic adversely affects our business and financial results, it may also exacerbate many of the other risks set forth in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including those relating to our financial performance and debt obligations. There are no comparable recent events that provide guidance as to the effect the COVID-19 global pandemic may have, and as a result, the ultimate impact of the pandemic is highly uncertain and subject to change. The Company may be adversely affected by fluctuations in the price or availability of CNG and diesel fuel. Fuel is one of the Company’s largest operating expenses. Fuel prices fluctuate greatly due to factors beyond the Company’s control, such as political events, price and supply decisions by oil producing countries and cartels, terrorist activities, environmental laws and regulations, armed conflicts, depreciation of the dollar against other currencies, world supply and demand imbalances, and hurricanes and other natural or man-made disasters, each of which may lead to an increase in the cost of fuel. Such events may lead not only to increases in fuel prices, but also to fuel shortages and disruptions in the fuel supply chain. Because the Company’s operations are dependent upon fuel, significant fuel cost increases, shortages or supply disruptions could materially and adversely affect its results of operations and financial condition. Although the Company's customers generally reimburse it for fuel expenses, those reimbursements are typically at fuel prices applicable to the preceding month. Although the Company's customers generally reimburse it for fuel expenses, those reimbursements are typically at fuel prices applicable to the preceding month. As a result, those reimbursements might be for amounts lower than the Company's fuel costs as fuel prices fluctuate. Our use of natural gas vehicles “NGVs” might not produce expected competitive advantages, and costs associated with using NGVs could exceed the related benefits that we are able to realize, both of which could adversely affect the Company’s results of operations and cash flows. We operate NGVs because we believe our use of NGVs provides us with a competitive advantage when bidding on USPS and other freight contracts. However, higher costs associated with purchasing and repairing NGVs might exceed any benefits attributable to our use of NGVs. For example, there are a limited number of original equipment manufacturers of NGVs and the engines, fuel tanks and other equipment required to upfit a gasoline or diesel engine to run on natural gas, which can increase costs related to purchasing and repairing NGVs as well limit the supply of NGVs available to purchase and therefore our ability to add to our fleet. Also, some of the higher costs of owning and operating NGVs have historically been offset by federal and state government incentives, including those that offset part or all of the additional up-front cost to acquire NGVs or convert vehicles to run on natural gas, those that waive vehicle weight limits for NGVs, and those that offer tax credits. However, those incentives may not continue. If those government incentives are discontinued or not renewed, our operating costs could significantly increase. In addition to potential increases in expenses and other operating costs related to our use of NGVs, if technologies are developed that either reduce the emissions in gasoline and diesel-powered vehicles or improve the operating capabilities of electric, solar, or other alternative fuel technology vehicles, the benefits of NGVs could be significantly reduced. Any such reduction could adversely affect our ability to retain existing freight contracts when they are up for renewal and receive new contracts, which would adversely impact our financial performance. Risks Related to Our Securities There is no established trading market for our common stock, and our stockholders may be unable to sell their shares. There is no established market, private or public, for any of our securities and there can be no assurance that a trading market will ever develop or, if developed, that it will be maintained. There can be no assurance that the Company’s stockholders will ever be able to resell their shares. Our common stock is subject to the “penny stock” rules of the SEC, which restrict transactions in our stock and may reduce the value of an investment in our stock. Our common stock is currently regarded as a “penny stock” because our shares are not listed on a national stock exchange or quoted on the NASDAQ Market within the United States and our common stock has a market price less than $5.00 per share. The penny stock rules require a broker-dealer to deliver a standardized risk disclosure document prepared by the SEC, to 16 provide a customer with additional information including current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction, monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the customer’s account, to make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser, and receive the purchaser’s written agreement to the transaction. The penny stock rules require a broker-dealer to deliver a standardized risk disclosure document prepared by the SEC, to provide a customer with additional information including current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction, monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the customer’s account, to make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser, and receive the purchaser’s written agreement to the transaction. To the extent these requirements may be applicable; they will reduce the level of trading activity in the secondary market for our common stock and may severely and adversely affect the ability of broker-dealers to sell our common stock. We are an “emerging growth company” and a "smaller reporting company," and the reduced disclosure requirements applicable to emerging growth companies and smaller reporting companies may make our common stock less attractive to investors. 16 We are an “emerging growth company” and a "smaller reporting company," and the reduced disclosure requirements applicable to emerging growth companies and smaller reporting companies may make our common stock less attractive to investors. We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the JOBS Act, as well as a smaller reporting company. For so long as we remain an emerging growth company and/or a smaller reporting company, we are permitted and intend to rely on exemptions from certain disclosure requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies or smaller reporting companies. These exemptions include: •being permitted to provide only two years of audited financial statements, in addition to any required unaudited interim financial statements, with correspondingly reduced “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” disclosure; •not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements in the assessment of our internal control over financial reporting of Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act; •not being required to comply with any requirement that may be adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board regarding mandatory audit firm rotation or a supplement to the auditor’s report providing additional information about the audit and the financial statements; •reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation; and •exemptions from the requirements of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and stockholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. We cannot predict whether investors will find our common stock less attractive if we rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our common stock less attractive as a result, we will experience greater difficulty raising equity capital, there may be a less active trading market for our common stock, and our stock price may be more volatile. If some investors find our common stock less attractive as a result, we will experience greater detail raising equity capital, there may be a less active trading market for our common stock, and our stock price may be more volatile. We have never paid and do not expect to pay cash dividends on our shares. We have never paid cash dividends, and we anticipate that any future profits received from operations will be retained for operations. We do not anticipate the payment of cash dividends on our capital stock in the foreseeable future and any decision to pay dividends will depend upon our profitability, available cash and other factors. Therefore, no assurance can be given that there will ever be any cash dividend or distribution in the future. We may in the future issue additional shares of our common stock which would reduce investors’ ownership interests in the Company and which may dilute our share value. Our certificate of incorporation authorizes the issuance of 110,000,000 shares consisting of: (i) 100,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.0001 per share; and (ii) 10,000,000 shares of preferred stock, par value $0.0001 per share. The future issuance of all or part of our remaining authorized common stock or preferred stock may result in substantial dilution in the percentage of our common stock held by our then existing stockholders. We may value any common stock issued in the future on an arbitrary basis. The issuance of common stock for future services or acquisitions or other corporate actions may have the effect of diluting the value of the shares held by our investors, and might have an adverse effect on any trading market for our common stock. 17 The Company’s certificate of incorporation permits the board of directors to issue stock with terms that may subordinate the rights of common stockholders or discourage a third party from acquiring the Company in a manner that might result in a premium price to the Company’s stockholders. The Company’s board of directors, without any action by the Company’s stockholders, may amend the Company’s certificate of incorporation from time to time to increase or decrease the aggregate number of shares or the number of shares of any class or series of stock that the Company has authority to issue. The board of directors may also classify or reclassify any unissued common stock or preferred stock into other classes or series of stock and establish the preferences, conversion or other rights, voting powers, restrictions, limitations as to dividends or other distributions, qualifications and terms or conditions of redemption of any class or series of stock. Thus, the board of directors could authorize the issuance of preferred stock with terms and conditions that could have a priority as to distributions and amounts payable upon liquidation over the rights of the holders of the Company’s common stock. For example, the Series A Preferred Stock authorized by the board of directors in April 2018, the Series B Preferred Stock authorized by the board of directors in March 2020, and the Series C Preferred Stock authorized by the board of directors in March 2022 all rank senior in preference and priority to the Company’s common stock with respect to dividend and liquidation rights and, generally votes with the common stock on an as converted basis on all matters presented for a vote of the holders of common stock, including directors, and entitle the holders of Series A Preferred Stock to fifteen votes for each share of Series A Preferred Stock held and the holders of Series B Preferred Stock to four votes for each share of Series B Preferred Stock held. For example, the Series A Preferred Stock authorized by the board of directors in April 2018 and the Series B Preferred Stock authorized by the board of directors in March 2020 both rank senior in preference and priority to the Company’s common stock with respect to dividend and liquidation rights and, generally votes with the common stock on an as converted basis on all matters presented for a vote of the holders of common stock, including directors, and entitle the holders of Series A Preferred Stock to fifteen votes for each share of Series A Preferred Stock held and the holders of Series B Preferred Stock to four votes for each share of Series B Preferred Stock held. Upon certain triggering events, the holder of our Series C preferred Stock is entitled to exercise a majority vote on all matters presented for a vote of the holders of common stock and to appoint a majority of our board of directors. The Series A Preferred stock, Series B Preferred stock, and Series C Preferred Stock, as well as any other series of preferred stock that the board of directors may authorize in the future could also have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control of us, including an extraordinary transaction (such as a merger, tender offer or sale of all or substantially all our assets) that might provide a premium price for holders of the Company’s common stock. The Series A Preferred stock and Series B Preferred stock, as well as any other series of preferred stock that the board of directors may authorize in the future could also have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control of us, including an extraordinary transaction (such as a merger, tender offer or sale of all or substantially all our assets) that might provide a premium price for holders of the Company’s common stock. Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments. As a smaller reporting company, the Company is not required to provide disclosure under this item. .
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