Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - DLHC

-New additions in green
-Changes in blue
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Item 1A.

Intellectual Property

Our business involves providing services to government entities, our operations generally are not substantially dependent upon obtaining and/or maintaining copyright or trademark protections, although our operations make use of such protections and benefit from them as discriminators in competition. We claim copyright, trademark and other proprietary rights in a variety of intellectual property, including each of our proprietary computer software and data products and the related documentation. We hold the trademarks, e-PRAT® and SPOT-m®, for our offerings that optimize resource allocation and supply chain management processes in connection with our business process management services, as well as the registered trademark, Infinibyte®, for our cloud-based solution. We maintain a number of trade secrets that contribute to our success and competitive distinction and endeavor to accord such trade secrets adequate protection to ensure their continuing availability.

Human Capital Management and Employee Relations

Our employees are critical to our success and are the reason we continue to execute at a high level. We believe our continued focus on making employee engagement a top priority will help us provide high quality insights and information to our customers.
As of September 30, 2023, we employed approximately 3,200 employees performing throughout the U.S. and one location overseas. Management believes that it has good relations with its employees.

Vision and Values

DLH’s vision is to be the most trusted provider of technology solutions and readiness enhancement services to Federal civilian and military agencies. Through our work, DLH supports Military Service Members, Veterans, children and families, and other at-risk and underserved communities. As a market influencer and emerging leader, DLH strives to shape and enhance the sustainability and readiness posture of those we serve, delivering value to our customers and stakeholders.

DLH stands on strong values including:
Integrity and Trust - We establish relationships throughout our organization and with customers and partners that are built on a foundation of mutual trust and respect, which exemplifies the way DLH does business. We are committed to the highest standards of ethical conduct during the course of all business.
Performance Excellence - We are focused on achieving all requirements, with a passion for continuous improvement in the quality of our services and products. We strive to be our customers' "best value" provider and attain the highest measure of customer and shareholder satisfaction.
Diversity and Inclusion - We create and sustain a corporate culture that fosters inclusion of all employees and values each individual's unique talents and perspectives. We leverage the value of our diversity into every aspect of our business.
Agility - As we grow, we continue to evolve in a manner that maintains our flexibility and agility. This allows us to anticipate and respond to ever-changing government service requirements while delivering maximum value to customers and shareholders.






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Talent Acquisition, Development, and Retention

Our success depends in large part on our ability to attract talent to meet the needs of our customers. To ensure we have the talent to meet the needs of our customers, we employ broad recruiting and outreach efforts to enable us to attract an inclusive pool of highly qualified candidates. As demand for talent is highly competitive, we continue to invest in our employees through a variety of benefits and overall program enhancements. We continually review and adapt our recruiting, hiring, and training efforts to respond to market imperatives and the needs of our customers.

We seek to attract and cultivate high performing talent by providing opportunities for career growth, skills development, and recognition for their contributions as they work to serve our customers. We provide competitive compensation programs to compete and reward our talented employees. We provide competitive compensation programs to help meet the needs of our employees. In addition to base compensation, additional compensatory benefits may include bonus programs and participation in a 401(k) Plan. We have used targeted equity-based grants with performance and service based vesting conditions to facilitate attracting and retaining key personnel. We also invest in talent development initiatives including industry-leading learning management solutions, professional credentialing, and licensures. We also invest in talent development initiatives including industry-leading learning management, professional credentialing, and applicant tracking systems. These benefits will further enhance our talented employee base and augment our efforts to infuse proven best practices into our operations through world-class talent acquisition and talent management tools. These will further enhance our highly qualified employee base and augment our efforts to infuse top talent into our operations through world-class recruiting and talent management tools.

Employee Safety and Health

We are committed to the health, safety and wellness of our employees. We provide our employees and their families with flexible and convenient health and wellness programs, including competitive benefits arrangements to address healthcare needs, including health insurance benefits, health savings and flexible spending accounts, paid time off, family leave, and family care resources.
Company Website and Information
Our corporate headquarters are located at 3565 Piedmont Road NE, Building 3 Suite 700, Atlanta, Georgia 30305. Our telephone number is (770) 554-3545. Our website is www.dlhcorp.com. The website contains information about our company and operations. Links to the Investor Relations section of our website, copies of our filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") on Forms 10-K, 10-Q, 8-K, and all amendments to those reports, can be viewed and downloaded free of charge as soon as reasonably practicable after the reports and amendments are electronically filed with or furnished to the SEC. In addition, the SEC maintains a website (www.sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC, including DLH. The information on our website is not incorporated by reference into and is not part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

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ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

As provided for under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 ("1995 Reform Act"), we wish to caution shareholders and investors that the following important factors, among others discussed throughout this Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2023, have affected, and in some cases could affect, our actual results of operations and cause our results to differ materially from those anticipated in forward looking statements made herein. Our business, results of operations, cash flows and financial condition may be materially and adversely affected due to any of the following risks. The risks described below are not the only ones we face. Additional risks we are not presently aware of or that we currently believe are immaterial may also impair our business operations. The trading price of our common stock could decline due to any of these risks. In assessing these risks, you should also refer to the other information contained or incorporated by reference in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including our consolidated financial statements and related notes.
Risks Relating to Our Business and the Industry in which we Compete
We depend on contracts with the Federal government for virtually all of our revenue and our business could be seriously harmed if the Federal government decreased or ceased doing business with us.
At present, we derive 99% of our revenue from agencies of the Federal government, primarily as a prime contractor but also as a subcontractor to other Federal prime contractors. In addition, substantially all accounts receivable, including unbilled accounts receivable, are from agencies of the U.S. Government as of September 30, 2023 and 2022. We expect that Federal government contracts will continue to be our primary source of revenue for the foreseeable future. We believe that the credit risk associated with our receivables is limited due to the creditworthiness of these customers. In general, if we were suspended or debarred from contracting with the federal government or if the government otherwise ceased doing business with us or significantly decreased the amount of business it does with us, our business, financial condition and operating results would be materially and adversely affected.

A significant portion of our revenue is concentrated in a small number of contracts, and we could be seriously harmed if we were unable to continue providing services under, or unsuccessful in our recompete efforts on, these contracts.

We are dependent upon the continuation of our relationships with the VA and HHS as a significant portion of our revenue is concentrated in contracts with these customers. There can be no assurance as to the actual amount of services that we will ultimately provide to VA and HHS under our current contracts, or that we will be successful in recompete efforts. As described in greater detail above in "Item 1 - Business - Major Contracts", our contracts with the VA for the provision of services to its CMOP operations are expected to be subject to renewal solicitations. We believe that our strong working relationships and effective service delivery support ongoing performance for the terms of the contracts and recompete efforts as a prime or subcontractor. Our results of operations, cash flows and financial condition would be materially adversely affected if we were unable to continue our relationship with either of these customers, if we were to lose any of our material current contracts, or if the amount of services we provide to them is materially reduced.

The U.S. government may prefer veteran-owned, minority-owned, women-owned and small disadvantaged businesses; therefore, we may have fewer opportunities to bid for or could lose a portion of our existing work to small businesses.

As a result of the Small Business Administration ("SBA") set-aside program, the U.S. government may decide to restrict certain procurement activity only to bidders that qualify as veteran owned, minority-owned, small, or small disadvantaged businesses. In such cases, we would not be eligible to perform as a prime contractor on those programs and would be limited to work as a subcontractor on those programs. As previously reported, various agencies within the federal government have policies that support small business goals, including the adoption of the “Rule of Two” by the VA, which provides that the agency shall award contracts by restricting competition for the contract to service-disabled or other veteran owned businesses. To restrict competition pursuant to this rule, the contracting officer must reasonably expect that at least two of these businesses, which are capable of delivering the services, will submit offers and that the award can be made at a fair and reasonable price that offers the best value to the U.S. The effect of these set-aside provisions may limit our ability to compete for prime contractor positions on programs that we have targeted for growth and to maintain our prime contractor position as current contracts are subject to renewal.

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Loss of our GSA schedule contracts or other contracting vehicles could impair our ability to win new business and perform under existing contracts.

We currently hold multiple GSA schedule contracts, including a Federal supply schedule contract for professional and allied healthcare services and the logistics worldwide services contract. If we were to lose one or more of these contracts or other contracting vehicles, we could lose a significant revenue source and our operating results and financial condition could be materially and adversely affected.

Future legislative or government budgetary and spending changes could negatively impact our business.

U.S. Government programs are subject to annual congressional budget authorization and appropriation processes. For many programs, Congress appropriates funds on a fiscal year basis even though the program performance period may extend over several years. Consequently, programs are often partially funded initially and additional funds are committed only as Congress makes further appropriations. In recent years, we have seen frequent debates regarding the scope of funding of our customers, thereby leading to budgetary uncertainty for our Federal customers. Changes in federal government budgetary priorities or actions taken to address government budget deficits, the national debt, and/or prevailing economic conditions, could directly affect our financial performance. Further, congressional seats may change during election years, and the balance of spending priorities may change along with them.

A significant decline in government expenditures, a shift of expenditures away from programs that we support or a change in federal government contracting policies could cause federal government agencies to reduce their purchases under contracts, to exercise their right to terminate contracts at any time without penalty or not to exercise options to renew contracts. In the event the budgets or budgetary priorities of the U.S. Government entities with which we do business are delayed, decreased or underfunded, our consolidated revenues and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

VA programs, which accounted for approximately 36.9% and 31.9% of Company revenue for the years ended September 30, 2023 and 2022, respectively, were exempt from the spending caps established under Federal government sequestration targets enacted in 2013.

Because we depend on U.S. government contracts, a delay in the completion of the U.S. government's budget and appropriations process could delay procurement of the services we provide and adversely affect our future revenues.

The funding of U.S. government programs is subject to an annual congressional budget authorization and appropriations process. In years when the U.S. government does not complete its appropriations before the beginning of the new fiscal year on October 1, government operations are typically funded pursuant to a "continuing resolution," which allows federal government agencies to operate at spending levels approved in the previous appropriations cycle but does not authorize new spending initiatives. Currently, the government is currently operating under a continuing resolution (CR) which expires on January 19, 2024 for certain departments and February 2, 2024 for others. When the U.S. government operates under a CR, delays can occur in the procurement of the services and solutions that we provide and may result in new initiatives being canceled. When a CR expires, unless appropriations bills have been passed by Congress and signed by the President, or a new CR is passed and signed into law, the government must cease operations, or shutdown, except in certain emergency situations or when the law authorizes continued activity. We continuously review our operations in an attempt to identify programs potentially at risk from CRs so that we can consider appropriate contingency plans. A federal government shutdown could, however, result in our incurrence of substantial labor or other costs without reimbursement under customer contracts, the delay or cancellation of programs or the delay of contract payments, which could have a negative effect on our cash flows and adversely affect our future results of operations.
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The markets in which we operate are highly competitive, and many of the companies we compete against have substantial resources. Further, the U.S. Government contract bid process is highly competitive, complex and sometimes lengthy, and is subject to protest and implementation delays.

The markets in which we operate are highly competitive. Further, many of our contracts and task orders with the Federal government are awarded through a competitive bidding process, which is complex and sometimes lengthy. We expect that many of the opportunities we will seek in the foreseeable future will be awarded through competitive bidding. We expect that much of the opportunities we will seek in the foreseeable future will be awarded through competitive bidding. Furthermore, budgetary pressures and developments in the procurement process have caused many government customers to increasingly purchase goods and services through IDIQ contracts, GSA schedule contracts and other government-wide acquisition contracts. These contracts, some of which are awarded to multiple contractors, have increased competition and pricing pressure, requiring that we make sustained post-award efforts to realize revenue under each such contract. Many of our competitors are larger and have greater resources than we do, larger customer bases and greater brand recognition. Our competitors, individually or through relationships with third parties, may be able to provide customers with different or greater capabilities or benefits than we can provide. If we are unsuccessful in competing with these other companies, our revenues and margins may materially decline.

Overall, the competitive bidding process presents a number of risks, including the following: (i) we expend substantial cost and managerial time and effort to prepare bids and proposals for contracts that we may not win, and to defend those bids through any protest process; (ii) we may be unable to estimate accurately the resources and cost structure that will be required to service any contract we win; and (iii) we may encounter expenses and delays if our competitors protest or challenge awards of contracts to us in competitive bidding, and any such protest or challenge could result in the resubmission of bids on modified specifications, or in the termination, reduction or modification of the awarded contract. If we are unable to win particular contracts, we may be prevented from providing the services that are purchased under those contracts for a number of years. If we are unable to consistently win new contract awards over any extended period, our business and prospects will be adversely affected and that could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated. In addition, upon the expiration of a contract, if the customer requires further services of the type provided by the contract, there is frequently a competitive rebidding process. There can be no assurance that we will win any particular bid, or that we will be able to replace business lost upon expiration or completion of a contract, and the termination or non-renewal of any of our significant contracts could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

If a bid is won and a contract awarded, there still is the possibility of a bid protest or other delays in implementation. Our business could be adversely affected by delays caused by our competitors protesting major contract awards received by us, resulting in the delay of the initiation of work. It can take many months to resolve protests by one or more of our competitors of contract awards we receive. The resulting delay in the startup and funding of the work under these contracts may cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated, and there can be no assurance that such protest process or implementation delays will not have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations in the future.

Our business may suffer if we or our employees are unable to obtain and maintain the necessary security clearances or other qualifications required to perform services for our customers.
Many federal government contracts require us to have security clearances and employ personnel with specified levels of education, work experience and security clearances. Depending on the level of clearance, security clearances can be difficult and time-consuming to obtain. If we or our employees lose or are unable to obtain necessary security clearances, we may not be able to win new business and our existing customers could terminate their contracts with us or decide not to renew them. To the extent we cannot obtain or maintain the required security clearances for our employees working on a particular contract, we may not derive the revenue anticipated from the contract, which could cause our results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

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Our business is regulated by complex federal procurement and contracting laws and regulations, and we are subject to periodic compliance reviews by governmental agencies.

We must comply with complex laws and regulations relating to the formation, administration, and performance of federal government contracts, including the Federal Acquisition Regulation, which, among other things, requires us to certify and disclose cost and pricing data and to divest work in the event of certain organizational conflicts of interest. These laws and regulations create compliance risk and affect how we do business with our federal agency customers and may impose added costs on our business. The government may in the future reform its procurement practices or adopt new contracting rules and regulations, including cost accounting standards, that could be costly to satisfy or that could impair our ability to obtain new contracts or change the basis upon which it reimburses our compensation and other expenses or otherwise limit such reimbursements. The government may in the future reform its procurement practices or adopt new contracting rules and regulations, including cost accounting standards, that could be costly to satisfy or that could impair our ability to obtain new contracts. These changes could impair our ability to obtain new contracts or win re-competed contracts or adversely affect our future profit margin. Additionally, the government may face restrictions from new legislation, regulations or government union pressures, on the nature and amount of services the government may obtain from private contractors. Any reduction in the government’s use of private contractors to provide federal services could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

Our performance on our U.S. Government contracts and our compliance with applicable laws and regulations, including submission of invoices to our customers, are subject to audit by the government. The scope of any such audits could span multiple fiscal years. These agencies review our performance on contracts, pricing practices, cost structure and compliance with applicable laws, regulations and standards. They also evaluate the adequacy of internal controls over our business systems, including our purchasing, accounting, estimating, earned value management, and government property systems. Any costs found to be improperly allocated or assigned to contracts will not be reimbursed, and any such costs already reimbursed must be refunded and certain penalties may be imposed. Moreover, if any of the administrative processes and systems are found not to comply with requirements, we may be subjected to increased government scrutiny and approval that could delay or otherwise adversely affect our ability to compete for or perform contracts or collect our revenues in a timely manner. Therefore, an unfavorable outcome of an audit could cause actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated. If a government review or investigation uncovers illegal activities or activities not in compliance with a particular contract's terms or conditions, we may be subject to civil and criminal penalties and administrative sanctions, including termination of contracts, forfeiture of profits, harm to our reputation, suspension of payments, fines, and suspension or debarment from doing business with Federal government agencies. Any of these events could lead to a material reduction in our revenues, cash flows and operating results. Further, as the reputation and relationships that we have established and currently maintain with government personnel and agencies are important to our ability to maintain existing business and secure new business, damage to our reputation or relationships could have a material adverse effect on our revenue and operating results.

Federal government contracts may be terminated at will and may contain other provisions that may be unfavorable to us.

Many of the U.S. Government programs in which we participate as a contractor or subcontractor may extend for several years. The U.S. Government may modify, curtail or terminate its contracts and subcontracts for convenience and to the extent that a contract award contemplates one or more option years, the Government may decline to exercise such option periods. Accordingly, the maximum contract value specified under a government contract or task order awarded to us is not necessarily indicative of the revenue that we will realize under that contract. Due to our dependence on these programs, the modification, curtailment or termination of our major programs or contracts may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. In addition, federal government contracts contain provisions and are subject to laws and regulations that give the government rights and remedies, some of which are not typically found in commercial contracts, including allowing the government to (i) cancel multi-year contracts and related orders if funds for contract performance for an subsequent year become unavailable; (ii) claim rights in systems and software developed by us; (iii) suspend or debar us from doing business with the federal government or with a governmental agency; and (iv) impose fines and penalties and subject us to criminal prosecution. If the government terminates a contract for convenience, we may recover only our incurred or committed costs, settlement expenses and profit on work completed prior to the termination. If the government terminates a contract for default, we may be unable to recover even those amounts and instead may be liable for excess costs incurred by the government in procuring undelivered items and services from another source. Depending on the value of a contract, such termination could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

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Certain contracts also contain organizational conflict of interest (OCI) clauses that limit our ability to compete for or perform certain other contracts. OCIs arise any time we engage in activities that (i) make us unable or potentially unable to render impartial assistance or advice to the government; (ii) impair or might impair our objectivity in performing contract work; or (iii) provide us with an unfair competitive advantage. For example, when we work on the design of a particular system, we may be precluded from competing for the contract to develop and install that system. Depending upon the value of the matters affected, an OCI issue that precludes our participation in or performance of a program or contract could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

We may not receive the full amounts authorized under the contracts included in our backlog, which could reduce our revenue in future periods below the levels anticipated.

Our total backlog consists of funded and unfunded amounts and may include estimates and assumptions about matters that cannot be determined with certainty at the time the backlog is calculated. Funded backlog represents contract value that has been appropriated by a customer and is expected to be recognized into revenue. Unfunded backlog represents the sum of the unappropriated contract value on executed contracts and unexercised option years that is expected to be recognized into revenue. The maximum contract value specified under a government contract or task order awarded to us is not necessarily indicative of the revenue that we will realize under that contract. For example, we generate revenue from IDIQ contracts, which do not require the government to purchase a pre-determined amount of goods or services under the contract. Action by the government to obtain support from other contractors or failure of the government to order the quantity of work anticipated could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated. Additionally, many of our multi-year contracts may only be partially-funded at any point during their term with the unfunded portion subject to future appropriations by Congress. As a result of a lack of appropriated funds or efforts to reduce federal government spending, our backlog may not result in revenue. Accordingly, our backlog may not result in actual revenue in any particular period, or at all, which could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

Our business growth and profitable operations require that we develop and maintain strong relationships with other contractors with whom we partner or otherwise depend on.

We may enter into future teaming ventures with other companies, which carry risk in regard to maintaining strong, trusted working relationships in order to successfully fulfill contract obligations.We may enter into future teaming ventures with other companies, which carry risk in regards to maintaining strong, trusted working relationships in order to successfully fulfill contract obligations. Teaming arrangements may include being engaged as a subcontractor to a prime contractor, engaging a subcontractor on a contract for which we are the prime contractor, or entering into a joint venture with another company. We may lack control over fulfillment of such contracts, and poor performance on the contract could impact our customer relationship, even if we perform as required. We expect to depend on relationships with other contractors for a portion of our revenue in the foreseeable future. Our revenue and operating results could differ materially and adversely from those anticipated if any such prime contractor or teammate chooses to offer directly to the customer services of the type that we provide or if they team with other companies to provide those services. Our revenue and operating results could differ materially and adversely from those anticipated if any such prime contractor or teammate chooses to offer directly to the client services of the type that we provide or if they team with other companies to provide those services.

Restrictions on or other changes to the federal government’s use of service contracts may harm our operating results.

We derive virtually all of our revenue from service contracts with the federal government. The government may face restrictions from new legislation, regulations or government union pressures on the nature and amount of services the government may obtain from private contractors (i.e., insourcing versus outsourcing). Any reduction in the government’s use of private contractors to provide federal services could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

Our earnings and margins may vary based on the mix of our contracts and programs.

At September 30, 2023, our backlog includes cost reimbursable, time-and-materials, and firm-fixed-price contracts. Our earnings and margins may vary depending on the relative mix of contract types, the costs incurred in their performance, the achievement of other performance objectives and the stage of performance at which the right to receive fees, particularly under incentive and award fee contracts, is finally determined.

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Our employees, or those of our teaming partners, may engage in misconduct or other improper activities which could harm our business.

We are exposed to risk from misconduct or fraud by our employees, or employees of our teaming partners. Such violations could include intentional disregard for Federal government procurement regulations, engaging in unauthorized activities, seeking reimbursement for improper expenses, or falsifying time records. Employee misconduct could also involve the improper use of our customers' sensitive or classified information and result in a serious harm to our reputation. Employee misconduct could also involve the improper use of our clients' sensitive or classified information and result in a serious harm to our reputation. While we have appropriate policies in effect to deter illegal activities and promote proper conduct, it is not always possible to deter employee misconduct. Precautions to prevent and detect this activity may not be effective in controlling such risks or losses. As a result of employee misconduct, we could face fines and penalties, loss of security clearance and suspension or debarment from contracting with the federal government, which could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition, cash flows, and liquidity.

If we are unable to attract qualified personnel, our business may be negatively affected.

We rely heavily on our ability to attract and retain qualified employees and other personnel who possess the skills, experience, and licenses necessary in order to provide our solutions for our assignments.We rely heavily on our ability to attract and retain qualified professionals and other personnel who possess the skills, experience, and licenses necessary in order to provide our solutions for our assignments. Our business is materially dependent upon the continued availability of such qualified personnel. Our inability to secure qualified personnel would have a material adverse effect on our business. Competition for qualified employees is intense and the cost of attracting qualified personnel and providing them with attractive benefits packages may be higher than we anticipate and, as a result, if we are unable to pass these costs on to our customers, our profitability could decline. Moreover, if we are unable to attract and retain qualified personnel, the quality of our services may decline and, as a result, we could lose customers.

If our subcontractors do not perform their contractual obligations, our performance as a prime contractor and our ability to obtain future business could be materially and adversely impacted and our actual results could differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

Our performance of government contracts may involve the issuance of subcontracts to other companies upon which we rely to perform all or a portion of the work we are obligated to deliver to our customers. Unsatisfactory performance by one or more of our subcontractors to deliver on a timely basis the agreed-upon supplies, perform the agreed-upon services, or appropriately manage their vendors may materially and adversely impact our ability to perform our obligations as a prime contractor. A subcontractor’s performance deficiency could result in the government terminating our contract for default. A default termination could expose us to liability for excess costs of reprocurement by the government and have a material adverse effect on our ability to compete for future contracts and task orders. Depending upon the level of problem experienced, such problems with subcontractors could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

The federal government’s appropriation process and other factors may delay the collection of our receivables, and our business may be adversely affected if we cannot collect our receivables in a timely manner. The federal government’s appropriation process and other factors may delay the collection of our receivables, and our business may be adversely affected if we cannot collect our receivables in a timely manner.

We depend on the collection of our receivables to generate cash flow, provide working capital, pay debt and continue our business operations. If the federal government or any prime contractor for whom we are a subcontractor fails to pay or delays the payment of their outstanding invoices for any reason, our business and financial condition may be materially and adversely affected. The government may fail to pay outstanding invoices for a number of reasons, including lack of appropriated funds or lack of an approved budget. Contracting officers have the authority to impose contractual withholdings, which can also adversely affect our ability to collect timely. If we experience difficulties collecting receivables, it could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated. In addition, from time to time, when we are awarded a contract, we incur significant expenses before we receive any contract payments. These expenses include leasing and outfitting office space, purchasing office equipment, and hiring personnel. In other situations, contract terms provide for billing upon achievement of specified project milestones. In these situations, we are required to expend significant sums of money before receiving related contract payments. As a result, in these situations, we are required to expend significant sums of money before receiving related contract payments. In addition, payments due to us from government agencies may be delayed due to billing cycles or as a result of failures by the government to approve governmental budgets in a timely manner. In addition to these factors, poor execution on project startups could impact us by increasing our use of cash. In certain circumstances, we may defer recognition of costs incurred at the inception of a contract. Such action assumes that we will be able to recover these costs over the life of the contract. To the extent that a project does not perform as anticipated, these deferred costs may not be considered recoverable resulting in an impairment charge.

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Risks Relating to Our Information Technology Systems and Intellectual Property

We are highly dependent on the proper functioning of our information systems.

We are highly dependent on the proper functioning of our information systems in operating our business. Critical information systems used in daily operations match employee resources and customer assignments and track regulatory credentialing. They also perform payroll, billing and accounts receivable functions. While we have multiple back up plans for these types of contingencies, our information systems are vulnerable to fire, storms, flood, power loss, telecommunication outages, physical break-ins, cyber-attack, ransomware, and similar events. While we have multiple back up plans for these types of contingencies, our information systems are vulnerable to fire, storm, flood, power loss, telecommunication outages, physical break-ins, cyber-attack, ransomware, and similar events. If our information systems become inoperable, or are otherwise unavailable, these functions would have to be accomplished manually, which in turn could impact our financial viability, due to the increased cost associated with performing these functions manually.

Our systems and networks may be subject to cybersecurity breaches.

Many of our operations rely heavily upon technology systems and networks to receive, input, maintain and communicate participant and customer data pertaining to the programs we manage. Any systems failures, whether caused by us, a third-party service provider, or unauthorized intruders and hackers, or due to situations such as computer viruses, natural disasters, or power shortages, could cause loss of data or interruptions or delays in our business or that of our customers. If our systems or networks were compromised by a security breach, we could be adversely affected by losing confidential or protected information of program participants and customers, and we could suffer reputational damage and a loss of confidence from prospective and existing customers. If our systems or networks were compromised by a security breach, we could be adversely affected by losing confidential or protected information of program participants and clients, and we could suffer reputational damage and a loss of confidence from prospective and existing clients. Similarly, if our internal networks were compromised, we could be adversely affected by the loss of proprietary, trade secret or confidential technical and financial data. The loss, theft or improper disclosure of that information could subject the Company to sanctions under the relevant laws, lawsuits from affected individuals, negative press articles and a loss of confidence from our government customers, all of which could adversely affect our existing business, future opportunities and financial condition. Further, our property and cyber insurance may be inadequate to compensate us for all losses that may occur as a result of any system or operational failure or disruption and, as a result, our actual results could differ materially and adversely from those anticipated. In addition, in order to provide services to our customers, we often depend upon or use customer systems that are supported by the customer or third parties. Any security breach or system failure in such systems could result in an interruption of our customer’s operations which could cause us to experience significant delays under a contract, and a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

Additionally, a number of projects require us to receive, maintain and transmit protected health information or other types of confidential personal information. That information may be regulated by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009, Internal Revenue Service regulations and other laws. The loss, theft or improper disclosure of that information could subject us to sanctions under these laws, breach of contract claims, lawsuits from affected individuals, negative press articles and a loss of confidence from our government customers, all of which could adversely affect our existing business, future opportunities and financial condition.

Failure to adequately protect, maintain, or enforce our rights in our intellectual property may adversely limit our competitive position.

We rely upon a combination of nondisclosure agreements and other contractual arrangements, as well as copyright, trademark, and trade secret laws to protect our proprietary information. We also enter into proprietary information and intellectual property agreements with employees, which require them to disclose any inventions created during employment, to convey such rights to inventions to us, and to restrict any disclosure of proprietary information. Trade secrets are generally difficult to protect. Although our employees are subject to confidentiality obligations, this protection may be inadequate to deter or prevent misappropriation of our confidential information and/or the infringement of our trademarks and copyrights. Further, we may be unable to detect unauthorized use of our intellectual property or otherwise take appropriate steps to enforce our rights. Failure to adequately protect, maintain, or enforce our intellectual property rights may adversely limit our competitive position.

We may face from time to time, allegations that we or a supplier or customer have violated the intellectual property rights of third parties. If, with respect to any claim against us for violation of third-party intellectual property rights, we are unable to prevail in the litigation or retain or obtain sufficient rights or develop non-infringing intellectual property or otherwise alter our business practices on a timely or cost-efficient basis, our business and competitive position may be adversely affected.
Any infringement, misappropriation or related claims, whether or not meritorious, are time consuming, divert technical and management personnel, and are costly to resolve. As a result of any such dispute, we may have to develop non-infringing intellectual property, pay damages, enter into royalty or licensing agreements, cease utilizing certain products or services, or take other actions to resolve the claims. These actions, if required, may be costly or unavailable on terms acceptable to us.
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Risks Relating to Acquisitions

In connection with acquisitions, we may be required to take write-downs or write-offs, restructuring and impairment, or other charges that could negatively affect our business, assets, liabilities, prospects, outlook, financial condition, and results of operations.

Although we conduct extensive due diligence in connection with an acquisition, we cannot assure that this diligence revealed all material issues that may be present, that it would be possible to uncover all material issues through customary due diligence, or that factors outside of our control will not later arise. We have also purchased representations and warranties insurance in connection with the acquisition, but there is no assurance that those policies will cover any losses we might experience from breaches of the sellers’ representations and warranties or otherwise arising from the acquisition. Even if our due diligence successfully identifies certain risks, unexpected risks may arise and previously known risks may materialize in a manner not consistent with our preliminary risk analysis. Further, as a result of the acquisition, purchase accounting, and the operation of the combined company after closing, we may be required to take write-offs or write-downs, restructuring and impairment or other charges that could negatively affect business, assets, liabilities, prospects, outlook, financial condition and results of operations.

We may have difficulty identifying and executing other acquisitions on favorable terms and therefore may grow at slower than anticipated rates.We may have difficulty integrating the operations of companies we acquire, which could cause actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

One of our potential paths to growth is to selectively pursue acquisitions. Through acquisitions, we may be able to expand our base of customers, increase the range of solutions we offer to our customers and deepen our penetration of existing markets and customers. We may not identify and execute suitable acquisitions. To the extent that management is involved in identifying acquisition opportunities or integrating new acquisitions into our business, our management may be diverted from operating our core business. Without acquisitions, we may not grow as rapidly otherwise, which could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

We may encounter other risks in regard to making acquisitions, including:

increased competition for acquisitions may increase the costs of our acquisitions;

non-discovery or non-disclosure of material liabilities during the due diligence process, including omissions by prior owners of any acquired businesses or their employees in complying with applicable laws or regulations, or their inability to fulfill their contractual obligations to the federal government or other customers; and

acquisition financing may not be available on reasonable terms or at all.

Any of these risks could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

We may have difficulty integrating the operations of companies we acquire, which could cause actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

The success of a potential future acquisition strategy depends upon our ability to successfully integrate the businesses. We may have difficulty integrating a business that we may acquire in the future. The integration of a business into our operations may result in unforeseen operating difficulties, absorb significant management attention and require significant financial resources that would otherwise be available for the ongoing development of our business. These integration difficulties include the integration of personnel with disparate business backgrounds, the transition to new information systems, coordination of geographically dispersed organizations, loss of key employees of acquired companies, and reconciliation of different corporate cultures. Further, the integration process could take longer than anticipated and could result in the loss of key employees, the disruption of each company’s ongoing businesses, result in tax costs or inefficiencies, or inconsistencies in standards, controls, information technology systems, procedures and policies, any of which could materially adversely affect our ability to maintain relationships with customers, employees or other third parties, or our ability to achieve the anticipated benefits of the transactions, and could harm our financial performance. For these or other reasons, we may be unable to retain key customers of acquired companies. Moreover, any acquired business may not generate the revenue or net income we expected or produce the efficiencies or cost-savings we anticipated. Any of these outcomes could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

With respect to our acquisition of Grove Resource Solutions (GRSi) in December 2022, the benefits of the acquisition will depend, in part, on our ability to successfully combine our businesses and realize the anticipated benefits, including business
16



opportunities and growth prospects from combining our businesses. We may not achieve these objectives within the anticipated time frame or may never realize these benefits and the value of our common stock may be harmed. The acquisition involves the integration of GRSi’s business with our existing business, which has been a costly and time-consuming process. If we are unable to successfully or timely integrate our operations with those of GRSi, we may incur unanticipated liabilities and be unable to realize the revenue growth, synergies, and other anticipated benefits resulting from the acquisition, and our business, results of operations, and financial condition could be materially adversely affected.

We have a substantial amount of goodwill on our balance sheet. Future write-offs of goodwill may have the effect of decreasing our earnings or increasing our losses.

We have obtained growth through acquisitions of other companies and businesses. Under existing accounting standards, we are required to periodically review goodwill for possible impairment. In the event that we are required to write down the value of any assets under these pronouncements, it may materially and adversely affect our earnings. See the more detailed discussion appearing as part of our Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in Item 7 herein.

Risks Relating to Our Outstanding Indebtedness

We have incurred debt in connection with acquisitions and we must make the scheduled principal and interest payments on the facility and maintain compliance with other debt covenants.

Following our acquisition of Grove Resource Solution, LLC ("GRSi") in December 2022, we amended and restated our credit agreement with First National Bank of Pennsylvania and certain other lenders (the “Credit Agreement”) and incurred additional indebtedness. The Credit Agreement requires compliance with a number of financial covenants and contains restrictions on our ability to engage in certain transactions, including limitations on: granting liens; incurring other indebtedness; disposing assets; making investments in other entities; and completing other mergers and consolidations. Also, the Credit Agreement requires us to comply with certain financial covenants including a minimum fixed charge coverage ratio and a maximum total leverage ratio. In addition, the Credit Agreement also requires prepayments of a percentage of excess cash flow. Accordingly, a portion of our cash flow from operations was dedicated to the repayment of our indebtedness and we expect future cash flow to be used to reduce our indebtedness. The loan agreement provides for customary events of default, including, among other things, a payment default, covenant default or defaults on other indebtedness or judgments in excess of a stipulated amount, change of control events, suspension or disbarment from contracting with the federal government and the material inaccuracy of our representations and warranties. If we are unable to make the scheduled principal and interest payments on the Credit Agreement or maintain compliance with other debt covenants, we may be in default under the loan agreement, which if not waived, could cause our debt to become immediately due and payable and enable the lenders to enforce their rights under the Credit Agreement. Such an event would likely have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our increased indebtedness could adversely affect us in a number of other ways, including:

causing us to be less able to take advantage of business opportunities, such as other acquisition opportunities, and to react to changes in market or industry conditions;

increasing our vulnerability to adverse economic, industry, or competitive developments;

affecting our ability to pay or refinance debts as they become due during adverse economic, financial market, and industry conditions;

requiring us to use a larger portion of cash flow for debt service, reducing funds available for other purposes;

decreasing our profitability and/or cash flow;

causing us to be disadvantaged compared to competitors with less leverage; and

limiting our ability to borrow additional funds in the future to fund working capital, capital expenditures, and other general corporate purposes.

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Risks Relating to Our Corporate Structure and Capital Stock

Our stock price may be volatile and your investment in our common stock may suffer a decline in value.

The price of our common stock could be subject to fluctuations and may decline in the future due to risks defined herein, or due to factors beyond our control, including changes in market conditions such as increased interest rates, a recession, or a change in Federal spending priorities. Stock markets in general have experienced volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of a particular company. These broad market fluctuations could adversely affect the trading price of our common stock.

Since we have not paid dividends on our common stock, you cannot expect dividend income from an investment in our common stock.

We have not paid any dividends on our common stock since our inception and do not contemplate or anticipate paying any dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. Current lenders do and future potential lenders may prohibit us from paying dividends without prior consent. Therefore, holders of our common stock may not receive any dividends on their investment in us. Earnings, if any, may be retained and used to finance the development and expansion of our business.

We may issue preferred stock with rights senior to our common stock, which may adversely impact the voting and other rights of the holders of our common stock.

Our certificate of incorporation authorizes the issuance of "blank check" preferred stock with such designations, rights and preferences as may be determined from time to time by our board of directors up to an aggregate of 5,000,000 shares of preferred stock. Accordingly, our board of directors is empowered, without stockholder approval, to issue preferred stock with dividend, liquidation, conversion, voting or other rights, which would adversely affect the voting power or other rights of the holders of our common stock. In the event of issuance, the preferred stock could be utilized, under certain circumstances, as a method of discouraging, delaying or preventing a change in control of our Company, which could have the effect of discouraging bids for our Company and thereby prevent stockholders from receiving the maximum value for their shares. Although we have no present intention to issue any shares of our preferred stock, in order to discourage or delay a change of control of our Company, we may do so in the future. In addition, we may determine to issue preferred stock in connection with capital raising efforts and the terms of the stock so issued could have special voting rights or rights related to the composition of our Board.

The exercise or vesting of our outstanding common stock options and restricted stock units may depress our stock price and dilute your ownership of the Company.

To the extent that options are exercised or restricted stock units vest, dilution to our shareholders will occur. We cannot foresee the impact of any potential sales of our common shares on the market, but it is possible that if a significant percentage of such available shares were attempted to be sold within a short period of time, the market for our shares would be adversely affected. It is also unclear whether or not the market for our common stock could absorb a large number of attempted sales in a short period of time. Moreover, the terms upon which we will be able to obtain additional equity capital may be adversely affected, since the holders of these securities can be expected to exercise them at a time when we would, in all likelihood, be able to obtain any needed capital on terms more favorable to us than the exercise terms provided by those securities. To the extent that these securities are exercised, dilution to our shareholders will occur. Moreover, the terms upon which we will be able to obtain additional equity capital may be adversely affected, since the holders of these securities can be expected to exercise them at a time when we would, in all likelihood, be able to obtain any needed capital on terms more favorable to us than the exercise terms provided by those securities.

Anti-takeover provisions in our Articles of Incorporation make a change in control of our Company more difficult.

The provisions of our Articles of Incorporation and the New Jersey Business Corporation Act, together or separately, could discourage potential acquisition proposals, delay or prevent a change in control and limit the price that certain investors might be willing to pay in the future for our common stock. Among other things, these provisions:

require certain supermajority votes; and

establish certain advance notice procedures for nomination of candidates for election as directors and for shareholders' proposals to be considered at shareholders' meetings.
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In addition, the New Jersey Business Corporation Act contains provisions that, under certain conditions, prohibit business combinations with 10% shareholders and any New Jersey corporation for a period of five years from the time of acquisition of shares by the 10% shareholder. The New Jersey Business Corporation Act also contains provisions that restrict certain business combinations and other transactions between a New Jersey corporation and 10% shareholders.

Our executive officers, directors and significant stockholders will be able to influence matters requiring stockholder approval.

As of September 30, 2023, our executive officers, directors and largest shareholder (Wynnefield Capital, Inc. and its affiliates) own approximately 44% of our outstanding common stock. Within this amount, Wynnefield Capital, Inc. and its affiliates own approximately 26% of our outstanding common stock. This concentration of ownership may have the effect of delaying, preventing or deterring a change in control of the Company, could deprive our stockholders of an opportunity to receive a premium for their common stock as part of a sale or merger of our company and may negatively affect the market price of our common stock. These matters might include proxy contests, tender offers, mergers or other purchases of common stock that could give our stockholders the opportunity to realize a premium over the then-prevailing market price for shares of our common stock.

In addition, persons associated with Wynnefield Capital, Inc. currently serve on our Board of Directors. As a result of this share ownership and relationships on our Board of Directors, our largest stockholder will be able to influence all affairs and actions of our company, including matters requiring stockholder approval such as the election of directors and approval of significant corporate transactions. The interests of our principal stockholders may differ from the interests of the other stockholders.

General Business Risks

We may experience fluctuations in our revenues and operating results from period to period.

Our revenue and operating results may fluctuate significantly and unpredictably in the future. We have expended, and will continue to expend, substantial resources to enhance our health services offerings and expansion into the Federal health market. We may incur growth expenses before new business revenue is realized, thus showing lower profitability in a particular period or consecutive periods. Other factors which may cause our cash flows and results of operations to vary from quarter to quarter include: the terms and progress of contracts; expenses related to certain contracts which may be incurred in periods prior to revenue being recognized; the commencement, completion or termination of contracts during any particular quarter; the timing and terms of award contracts; and government budgetary delays or shortfalls. We may be unable to achieve the desired levels of revenue growth due to circumstances that are beyond our control, as already expressed regarding competition, government budgets, and the procurement process in general. We may be unable to achieve desired levels of revenue growth due to circumstances that are beyond our control, as already expressed regarding competition, government budgets, and the procurement process in general. In particular, if the federal government does not adopt, or delays adoption of, a budget for each fiscal year beginning on October 1, or fails to pass a continuing resolution, federal agencies may be forced to suspend our contracts and delay the award of new and follow-on contracts and orders due to a lack of funding. Also, some aspects of this work can be seasonal with regard to resources and funding, and it is difficult to predict the timing of when those resources will be expended. Although we continue to manage our operating costs and expenses, there is no guarantee that we will significantly increase future revenue and profit in any particular future period. Revenue levels achieved from our customers, the mix of solutions that we offer and our performance on future contracts will affect our financial results. Further, changes in the volume of activity and the number of contracts commenced, completed or terminated during any quarter may cause significant variations in our cash flows and results of operations. Therefore, period-to-period comparisons of our operating results may not be a good indication of our future performance.

An increase in the prices of goods and services could raise the costs associated with providing our services, diminish our ability to compete for new contracts or task orders and/or reduce customer buying power.

We may experience an increase in the costs in our supply and labor markets due to global inflationary pressures and other various geopolitical factors. We generate a portion of our revenues through various fixed price and multi-year government contracts which anticipate moderate increases in costs over the term of the contract. With the current pace of inflation our standard approach to moderate annual price escalations in our bids for multi-year work may be insufficient to counter inflationary cost pressures. This could result in reduced profits, or even losses, as inflation increases, particularly for fixed priced contracts and our longer-term multi-year contracts. In the competitive environment in which we operate as a government contractor, the lack of pricing leverage and ability to renegotiate long-term, multi-year contracts, could reduce our profits, disrupt our business, or otherwise materially adversely affect our results of operations.

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Our profits and revenues could suffer if we are involved in legal proceedings, investigations, and disputes.

We are exposed to legal proceedings, investigations and disputes. In addition, in the ordinary course of our business we may become involved in legal disputes regarding personal injury or employee disputes. While we provide for these types of incidents through commercial third-party insurance carriers, we often defray these types of cost through higher deductibles. Any unfavorable legal ruling against us could result in substantial monetary damages by losing our deductible portion of carried insurance. We maintain insurance coverage as part of our overall legal and risk management strategy to lower our potential liabilities. If we sustain liabilities that exceed our insurance coverage or for which we are not insured, it could have a material adverse impact on our results of operations, cash flows and financial condition, including our profits, revenues and liquidity.

We are dependent upon certain of our management personnel and do not maintain "key personnel" life insurance on our executive officers.

Our success to date has resulted in part from the significant contributions of our executive officers. Our executive officers are expected to continue to make important contributions to our success. As of September 30, 2023, certain of our officers are under employment contracts. However, we do not maintain "key personnel" life insurance on any of our executive officers. Loss for any reason of the services of our key personnel could materially affect our operations.

We may not be fully covered by the insurance we procure and our business could be adversely impacted if we were not able to renew all of our insurance plans.

Although we carry multiple lines of liability insurance (including coverage for medical malpractice and workers' compensation), they may not be sufficient to cover the total cost of any judgments, settlements or costs relating to any present or future claims, suits or complaints. If we are unable to secure renewal of our insurance contracts or the renewal of such contracts with favorable rates and with competitive benefits, our business could be adversely affected. In addition, sufficient insurance may not be available to us in the future on satisfactory terms or at all. Further, the fact that the majority of our employees are located at customer locations increases our potential liability for negligence and professional malpractice and such liabilities may not become immediately apparent. Any increase in our costs of insurance will impact our profitability to the extent that we cannot offset these increases into our costs of services. If the insurance we carry is not sufficient to cover any judgments, settlements or costs relating to any present or future claims, suits or complaints, our business, financial condition, results of operations and liquidity could be materially adversely affected.

Our financial condition may be affected by increases in employee healthcare claims and insurance premiums, and workers' compensation claims and insurance rates.

Our current workers' compensation and medical plans are partially self-funded insurance programs. The Company currently pays base premiums plus actual losses incurred, not to exceed certain individual and aggregate stop-loss limits. In addition, health insurance premiums, and workers' compensation rates for the Company are in large part determined by our claims experience. These categories of expenditure comprise a significant portion of our direct costs. If we experience a large increase in claim activity, our direct expenditures, health insurance premiums, unemployment taxes or workers' compensation rates may increase. Although we employ internal and external risk management procedures in an attempt to manage our claims incidence and estimate claims expenses and structure our benefit contracts to provide as much cost stability as reasonably possible given the self-funded nature of our plans, we may not be able to prevent increases in claim activity, accurately estimate our claims expenses or pass the cost of such increases on to our customers. Since our ability to incorporate such increases into our fees to our customers is constrained by contractual arrangements with our customers, a delay could occur before such increases could be reflected in our fees, which may reduce our profit margin. Since our ability to incorporate such increases into our fees to our clients is constrained by contractual arrangements with our clients, a delay could occur before such increases could be reflected in our fees, which may reduce our profit margin. As a result, such increases could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and liquidity.

We may be subject to fines, penalties and other sanctions if we do not comply with laws governing our business.

Our business lines operate within a variety of complex regulatory schemes, including but not limited to the FAR, Federal Cost Accounting Standards, the Truth in Negotiations Act, as well as the regulations governing accounting standards. If a government audit finds improper or illegal activities by us or we otherwise determine that these activities have occurred, we may be subject to civil and criminal penalties and administrative sanctions, including termination of contracts, forfeiture of profits, suspension of payments, fines and suspension or disqualification from doing business with the government. Any adverse determination could adversely impact our ability to bid in response to RFPs in one or more jurisdictions. Further, as a government contractor subject to the types of regulatory schemes described above, we are subject to an increased risk of investigations, criminal prosecution, civil fraud, whistleblower lawsuits and other legal actions and liabilities to which private
20



sector companies are not, the result of which could have a material adverse effect on our operating results, cash flows and financial condition.

Changes to U.S. tax laws may adversely affect our financial condition or results of operations and create the risk that we may need to adjust our accounting for these changes.

The accounting treatment of these tax law changes is complex, and some of the changes may affect both current and future periods. Consistent with guidance from the SEC, our consolidated financial statements reflect our estimates of the tax effects of the current tax laws and regulations.

We are exposed to increased costs and risks associated with complying with increasing and new regulation of corporate governance and disclosure standards.

Since the implementation of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, we spend a significant amount of management's time and resources (both internal and external) to comply with changing laws, regulations and standards relating to corporate governance and public disclosures. This compliance requires management's annual review and evaluation of our internal control systems. This process has caused us to engage outside advisory services and has resulted in additional accounting and legal expenses. We may encounter problems or delays in completing these reviews and evaluation and the implementation of improvements. If we are not able to timely comply with the requirements set forth in the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, we might be subject to sanctions or investigation by regulatory authorities. Any such action could materially adversely affect our business and our stock price.

Our results of operations could in the future be materially adversely impacted by global, macroeconomic events, such health epidemics, pandemics and other outbreaks, and the response to contain it.

We face various risks related to health epidemics, pandemics, and similar outbreaks, including the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic and the mitigation efforts to control its spread have created significant volatility, uncertainty and economic disruption and adversely impacted the U.S. and global economies. The extent to which the coronavirus pandemic and recovery activity further impacts our business, operations and financial results will depend on numerous evolving factors that we may not be able to accurately predict, including: the duration and scope of the pandemic; governmental, business and individuals’ actions that have been and which may continue to be taken in response to the pandemic, including our ability to fully perform on our contracts as a result of government actions; the impact of the pandemic on economic activity and actions taken in response; the effect on our customers and customer demand for our services and solutions; our ability to sell and provide our services and solutions; and any closures of our and our customers’ offices and facilities, particularly at our pharmacy distribution centers. Furthermore, the significant increase in remote working of our employees may exacerbate certain risks to our business, including an increased demand for information technology resources and the increased risk of malicious technology-related events, such as cyberattacks and phishing attacks. Government agencies are our primary customers and the long-term impact of increased government spending in response to COVID-19 remains uncertain. We continue to monitor the effect of COVID-19 on our business, but for the reasons stated above, we cannot predict the full impact of COVID-19. Any of these events could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and the market price of our common stock.

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
There are no unresolved staff comments.
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