Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - CTO

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$CTO Risk Factor changes from 00/02/24/22/2022 to 00/02/22/24/2024

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORSSUMMARY OF RISK FACTORSBelow is a summary of the principal factors that make an investment in our securities speculative or risky. This summary does not address all of the risks that we face.

Additional discussion of the risks summarized in this risk factor summary, and other risks that we face, can be found below under the heading “Risk Factors” and should be carefully 11 Table of Contentsconsidered, together with other information in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and our other filings with the SEC, before making an investment decision regarding our securities. Additional discussion of the risks summarized in this risk factor summary, and other risks that we face, can be found below under the heading “Risk Factors” and should be carefully considered, together with other information in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and our other filings with the SEC, before making an investment decision regarding our securities. ●We are subject to risks related to the ownership of commercial real estate that could affect the performance and value of our properties.●We are subject to risks related to the ownership of commercial real estate that could affect the performance and value of our properties. ●Adverse changes in U.S., global and local regions or markets that impact our tenants’ businesses may materially and adversely affect us generally and the ability of our tenants to make rental payments to us pursuant to our leases.●Our business is dependent upon our tenants successfully operating their businesses, and their failure to do so could materially and adversely affect us.●The loss of revenues from our income property portfolio or certain tenants would adversely impact our results of operations and cash flows.●Retail properties, particularly those with multiple tenants, depend on the presence of and successful operation of an anchor tenant or tenants and the failure of such tenant’s business or the loss of the anchor tenant(s) could adversely affect the overall success of our property and thereby could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.●We are subject to risks that affect the general retail environment in the United States, such as weakness in the economy, the level of consumer spending, the adverse financial condition of large consumer retail companies and competition from discount and internet retailers, any of which could adversely affect market rents for retail space and the willingness or ability of retail tenants to lease space in our multi-tenant properties.●A significant portion of the revenue we generate from our income property portfolio is concentrated in specific industry classifications and/or geographic locations and any prolonged dislocation in those industries or downturn in those geographic areas would adversely impact our results of operations and cash flows.●Our revenues include receipt of management fees and potentially incentive fees derived from our provision of management services to PINE and the loss or failure, or decline in the business or assets, of PINE could substantially reduce our revenues.●There are various potential conflicts of interest in our relationship with PINE, including our executive officers and/or directors who are also officers and/or directors of PINE, which could result in decisions that are not in the best interest of our stockholders.●A part of our investment strategy is focused on investing in commercial loans and investments which may involve credit risk or the risk that our borrowers will fail to pay scheduled contractual payments to us when due.●A part of our investment strategy is focused on investing in commercial loan and master lease investments which may involve credit risk. ●We may invest in fixed-rate loan investments, and an increase in market interest rates may adversely affect the value of these investments, which could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.●We may invest in fixed-rate loan investments, and an increase in interest rates may adversely affect the value of these investments, which could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. ●The commercial loans or similar financings we may acquire that are secured by commercial real estate typically depend on the ability of the property owner to generate income from operating the property. Failure to do so may result in delinquency and/or foreclosure.●We may suffer losses when a borrower defaults on a loan and the value of the underlying collateral is less than the amount due.●The Company’s real estate investments are generally illiquid. The Company’s real estate investments are generally illiquid. ●We may experience a decline in the fair value of our real estate assets or investments which could result in impairments and would impact our financial condition and results of operations.●The Company may from time to time have stockholders that beneficially own more than 5% of the Company’s outstanding common stock and exercise the related voting rights of those shares.●The Company has several stockholders that beneficially own more than 5% of the Company’s outstanding common stock and exercise the related voting rights of those shares. Actions by these stockholders, including trading activity, could have a material adverse impact on the trading price of our stock.●The Company may be unable to obtain debt or equity capital on favorable terms, if at all, or additional borrowings may impact our liquidity or ability to monetize any assets securing such borrowings.●Servicing our debt requires a significant amount of cash, and we may not have sufficient cash flow from our business to service or pay our debt.●Our operations and properties could be adversely affected in the event of natural disasters, pandemics, or other significant disruptions.12 Table of Contents●We may encounter environmental problems which require remediation or the incurrence of significant costs to resolve, which could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows.●We may encounter environmental problems which require remediation or the incurrence of significant costs to resolve, which could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows. ●Failure to remain qualified as a REIT, would cause us to be taxed as a regular corporation, which would substantially reduce funds available for distributions to our stockholders.●Even if we qualify as a REIT, we may face other tax liabilities that could reduce our cash flows and negatively impact our results of operations and financial condition.●If we failed to distribute our Pre-REIT Conversion Earnings and Profits, we could fail to qualify as a REIT.●Failure to make required distributions would subject us to U.S. federal corporate income tax.●Complying with REIT requirements may limit our ability to hedge our liabilities effectively and may cause us to incur tax liabilities.●The prohibited transactions tax may limit our ability to dispose of our properties.●The ability of the Board to revoke our REIT qualification without stockholder approval may cause adverse consequences to our stockholders.●If we are not successful in utilizing the Section 1031 like-kind exchange structure in deploying the proceeds from dispositions of income properties, or our Section 1031 like-kind exchange transactions are disqualified, we could incur significant taxes and our results of operations and cash flows could be adversely impacted.●If we are not successful in utilizing the like-kind exchange structure in deploying the proceeds from dispositions of income properties, or our like-kind exchange transactions are disqualified, we could incur significant taxes and our results of operations and cash flows could be adversely impacted. ●Dividends payable by REITs do not qualify for the reduced tax rates available for some dividends.​RISK FACTORSOur business is subject to a number of significant risks. The risks described below may not be the only risks which potentially could impact our business. These additional risks include those which are unknown now or that are currently considered immaterial. If any of the circumstances, events, or developments described below actually occur to a significant degree, our business, financial condition, results of operations, and/or cash flows could be materially adversely affected, and the trading price of our common stock and preferred stock could decline.

You should carefully consider the following risks and all the other information set forth in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including the consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto.​Risks Related to Our Business ​Income Property Operations​We are subject to risks related to the ownership of commercial real estate that could affect the performance and value of our properties. ​Factors beyond our control can affect the performance and value of our properties. Our core business is the ownership of commercial properties that generate lease revenue from either a single tenant in a stand-alone property or multiple tenants occupying a single structure or multiple structures. Accordingly, our performance is subject to risks incident to the ownership of commercial real estate, including:​●inability to collect rents from tenants due to financial hardship, including bankruptcy;●changes in local real estate conditions in the markets where our properties are located, including the availability and demand for the properties we own;●changes in consumer trends and preferences that affect the demand for products and services offered by our tenants;●adverse changes in national, regional and local economic conditions;●inability to lease or sell properties upon expiration or termination of existing leases;●environmental risks, including the presence of hazardous or toxic substances on our properties;●the subjectivity of real estate valuations and changes in such valuations over time;●illiquidity of real estate investments, which may limit our ability to modify our portfolio promptly in response to changes in economic or other conditions;●zoning or other local regulatory restrictions, or other factors pertaining to the local government institutions which inhibit interest in the markets in which our properties are located;●changes in interest rates and the availability of financing;●competition from other real estate companies similar to ours and competition for tenants, including competition based on rental rates, age and location of properties and the quality of maintenance, insurance 13 Table of Contentsand management services;●acts of God, including natural disasters and global pandemics, such as the COVID-19 Pandemic and its variants, which impact the United States, which may result in uninsured losses;●acts of war or terrorism, including consequences of terrorist attacks;●changes in tenant preferences that reduce the attractiveness and marketability of our properties to tenants or cause decreases in market rental rates;●costs associated with the need to periodically repair, renovate or re-lease our properties;●increases in the cost of our operations, particularly maintenance, insurance or real estate taxes which may occur even when circumstances such as market factors and competition cause a reduction in our revenues;●changes in governmental laws and regulations, fiscal policies and zoning ordinances and the related costs of compliance with laws and regulations, fiscal policies and ordinances including in response to global pandemics whereby our tenants’ businesses are forced to close or remain open on a limited basis only; and●commodities prices.​The occurrence of any of the risks described above may cause the performance and value of our properties to decline, which could materially and adversely affect us.​Adverse changes in U.S., global and local regions or markets that impact our tenants’ businesses may materially and adversely affect us generally and the ability of our tenants to make rental payments to us pursuant to our leases. ​Our results of operations, as well as the results of operations of our tenants, are sensitive to changes in U.S., global and local regions or markets that impact our tenants’ businesses. Adverse changes or developments in U.S., global or regional economic conditions may impact our tenants’ financial condition, which may adversely impact their ability to make rental payments to us pursuant to the leases they have with us and may also impact their current or future leasing practices. Adverse economic conditions such as high unemployment levels, rising interest rates, increased tax rates and increasing fuel and energy costs may have an impact on the results of operations and financial conditions of our tenants, which would likely adversely impact us. During periods of economic slowdown and declining demand for real estate, we may experience a general decline in rents or increased rates of default under our leases. A lack of demand for rental space could adversely affect our ability to maintain our current tenants and gain new tenants, which may affect our growth, profitability and ability to pay dividends. ​Our business is dependent upon our tenants successfully operating their businesses, and their failure to do so could materially and adversely affect us. ​Each of our properties is occupied by a single tenant or multiple tenants. Therefore, the success of our investments in these properties is materially dependent upon the performance of our tenants. The financial performance of any one of our tenants is dependent on the tenant’s individual business, its industry and, in many instances, the performance of a larger business network that the tenant may be affiliated with or operate under. The financial performance of any one of our tenants could be adversely affected by poor management, unfavorable economic conditions in general, changes in consumer trends and preferences that decrease demand for a tenant’s products or services or other factors, including the impact of a global pandemic which affects the United States, over which neither they nor we have control. To the extent we own multiple properties operated by one tenant, the general failure of that single tenant or a loss or significant decline in its business could materially and adversely affect us. ​At any given time, any tenant may experience a decline in its business that may weaken its operating results or the overall financial condition of individual properties or its business as a whole. Any such decline may result in our tenant failing to make rental payments when due, declining to extend a lease upon its expiration, delaying occupancy of our property or the commencement of the lease or becoming insolvent or declaring bankruptcy. We depend on our tenants to operate their businesses at the properties we own in a manner which generates revenues sufficient to allow them to meet their obligations to us, including their obligations to pay rent, maintain certain insurance coverage, pay real estate taxes, make repairs and otherwise maintain our properties. We depend on our tenants to 17 Table of Contentsoperate their businesses at the properties we own in a manner which generates revenues sufficient to allow them to meet their obligations to us, including their obligations to pay rent, maintain certain insurance coverage, pay real estate taxes, make repairs and otherwise maintain our properties. The ability of our tenants to fulfill their obligations under our leases may depend, in part, upon the overall profitability of their operations. Cash flow generated by certain tenant businesses may not be sufficient for a tenant to meet its obligations to us pursuant to the applicable lease. We could be materially and adversely affected if a tenant representing a significant portion of our operating results or a number of our tenants were unable to meet their obligations to us. ​14 Table of ContentsRetail properties, particularly those with multiple tenants, depend on the presence of and successful operation of an anchor tenant or tenants and the failure of such tenant’s business or the loss of the anchor tenant(s) could adversely affect the overall success of our property and thereby could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. ​Retail properties, particularly those with multiple tenants, depend on the presence of and successful operation of an anchor tenant or tenants and the failure of such tenant’s business or the loss of the anchor tenant(s) could adversely affect the overall success of our property and thereby could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. ​Retail properties, like other properties, are subject to the risk that tenants may be unable to make their lease payments or may decline to extend a lease upon its expiration. A multi-tenant property is particularly sensitive to the risk that a tenant that occupies a large area of a commercial retail property (commonly referred to as an anchor tenant) is unable to make their lease payments, does not extend their lease upon its expiration, or otherwise vacates their rented space. A lease termination by an anchor tenant or tenants could impact leases of other tenants. Other tenants may be entitled to modify the terms of their existing leases in the event of a lease termination by an anchor tenant, or the closure of the business of an anchor tenant that leaves its space vacant even if the anchor tenant continues to pay rent. Any such modifications or conditions could be unfavorable to us as the property owner and could decrease rents or expense recoveries. Additionally, should an anchor tenant vacate their leased space customer traffic to the property may be decreased, which could lead to decreased sales at other stores thus adversely impacting the tenant’s operations and impacting their ability to pay rent. In the event of default by a tenant or anchor store, we may experience delays and costs in enforcing our rights as landlord to recover amounts due to us under the terms of our agreements with those parties.​We are subject to risks that affect the general retail environment in the United States, such as weakness in the economy, the level of consumer spending, the adverse financial condition of large consumer retail companies and competition from discount and internet retailers, any of which could adversely affect market rents for retail space and the willingness or ability of retail tenants to lease space in our multi-tenant properties. A significant portion of the properties in our income property portfolio are commercial properties that were developed to be occupied by retail tenants and thus we are subject to the risks that affect the retail sector generally, as well as the market for retail space. The business environment for retail operators and the market for retail space have previously been, and could again be, adversely affected by weakness in the national, regional and local economies, the level of consumer spending and consumer confidence, the adverse financial condition of some large retail companies, the consolidation of operators that occurs from time to time in the retail sector, any excess amount of retail space in a number of markets and increasing competition from discount retail operators, outlet malls, internet or e-commerce retail businesses and other online businesses. Increases in consumer spending through e-commerce channels may significantly affect our retail tenants’ ability to generate sales in their stores and could affect the way future tenants lease space. In addition, some of our retail tenants face competition from the expanding market for digital content and hardware. New and enhanced technologies, including new digital technologies, new web services technologies and artificial intelligence, may increase competition for certain of our retail tenants. New and enhanced technologies, including new digital technologies and new web services technologies, may increase competition for certain of our retail tenants. We cannot predict with certainty what future tenants will require to operate their businesses, what demands will be made for the build out of future retail spaces and how much revenue will be generated at traditional “brick and mortar” locations. If we are unable to anticipate and respond promptly to trends in the market, our occupancy levels and rental income may decline.​Any of the foregoing factors could adversely affect the financial condition of our retail tenants and the willingness of retail operators to lease space at our income properties. In turn, these conditions could negatively affect market rents for retail space and could materially and adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations, cash flow and our ability to satisfy our debt service obligations and to pay distributions to the Company’s stockholders.​Competition that traditional retail tenants face from e-commerce retail sales, or the integration of brick and mortar stores with e-commerce retail operators, could adversely affect our business.​​​​18 Table of ContentsCompetition that traditional retail tenants face from e-commerce retail sales, or the integration of brick and mortar stores with e-commerce retail operators, could adversely affect our business. ​Our retail tenants face increasing competition from e-commerce businesses. E-commerce sales continue to account for an increasing percentage of retail sales in the U.S. and this trend is likely to continue. These trends may have an impact on decisions that retail businesses make regarding their utilization of “brick and mortar” stores. Changes in shopping trends as a result of the growth in e-commerce may also impact the profitability of retail operators that do not adapt to changes in market conditions. The continued growth of e-commerce sales could decrease the need for traditional retail outlets and reduce the demand for retail space and property requirements. These conditions could adversely impact our results of operations and cash flows if we are unable to meet the needs of our tenants or if our tenants encounter financial difficulties as a result of changing market conditions.15 Table of ContentsA key element of our future success will depend upon, among other things, our ability to successfully execute our strategy to invest in income-producing assets which if unsuccessful could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.A key element of our future success will depend upon, among other things, our ability to successfully execute our strategy to invest in income-producing assets which if unsuccessful could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. ​There is no assurance that we will be able to continue to execute our strategy of investing in income-producing assets, including income properties and commercial loans or similar financings secured by real estate. There is no assurance that the number of properties in our income property portfolio or the number of loans in our loan investment portfolio will expand at all or, if they expand, at any specified rate or to any specified size. If we continue to invest in diverse geographic markets other than the markets in which we currently own income properties or loan investments, we will be subject to risks associated with investing in new markets as those markets may be relatively unfamiliar to us. In addition, investments in new markets may introduce increased costs to us relating to factors including the regulatory environment and the local and state tax structure. Additionally, there is no assurance we will be able to continue to make investments in commercial loans or similar financings secured by real estate. Consequently, if we are unable to successfully execute our strategy of investing in income-producing assets or some or all of our investments, including in new markets, introduce increased operating costs our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows may be adversely affected. We operate in a highly competitive market for the acquisition of income properties and more established entities or other investors may be able to compete more effectively for acquisition opportunities than we can. ​A number of entities and other investors compete with us to purchase income properties. We compete with REITs, public and private real estate focused companies, high wealth individual investors, and others. Many of our competitors are substantially larger and have considerably greater financial, technical and marketing resources than we do. Several of our public company competitors have greater access to capital, typically by raising equity or debt financing, have significant amounts of capital available and investment objectives that overlap with ours, which often creates competition for acquisition opportunities. Some competitors may have a lower cost of capital and access to funding sources that are not available to us. In addition, some of our competitors may have higher risk tolerances or different assessments of investment risk, which could allow them to consider a wider variety of income property acquisitions and establish more relationships than us. We cannot be assured that the competitive pressures we face will not have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and therefore our cash flows. Also, because of this competition, we may not be able to take advantage of attractive acquisition opportunities from time to time, and we can offer no assurance that we will be able to identify and purchase assets that are consistent with our objectives. The loss of revenues from our income property portfolio or certain tenants would adversely impact our results of operations and cash flows. Certain of our tenants may account for a significant portion of our total revenues and/or square footage in our income property portfolio (see Note 2, “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” under the heading Concentration of Credit Risk in the notes to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8). Certain of our tenants may account for a significant portion of our total revenues and or square footage in our income property portfolio (see Note 2, “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” under the heading Concentration of Credit Risk in the notes to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8). The default, financial distress, or bankruptcy of one or all of our major tenants could cause substantial vacancies in some of the largest properties in our income property portfolio and reduce our revenues from our income property operations significantly, thereby adversely impacting our results of operations and cash flows. Vacancies reduce our revenue until the affected properties can be re-leased and could decrease the value of each such vacant property. Upon the expiration of the leases that are currently in place, we may not be able to re-lease a vacant property at a comparable lease rate or without incurring additional expenditures in connection with such re-leasing. If, following the loss of an income property tenant, we are unable to re-lease the income property at comparable rental rates and in a timely manner, our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could be adversely affected. If, following the loss of an income property tenant, we are unable to re-lease the income property at 19 Table of Contentscomparable rental rates and in a timely manner, our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could be adversely affected. A significant portion of the revenue we generate from our income property portfolio is concentrated in specific industry classifications and/or geographic locations and any prolonged dislocation in those industries or downturn in those geographic areas would adversely impact our results of operations and cash flows. Certain of our tenants and or geographic concentrations may account for a significant portion of our base rent revenue (see Note 2, “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” under the heading Concentration of Credit Risk in the notes to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8). Such geographic concentrations could be heightened by the fact that our investments may be concentrated in certain areas that are affected by epidemics or pandemics such as COVID-19 more than other areas. Such geographic concentrations could be heightened by the fact that our investments may be concentrated in certain areas that are affected by COVID-19 more than other areas. Any financial hardship and/or economic downturns in the financial industry, including a downturn similar 16 Table of Contentsto the financial crisis in 2007 through 2009, or in the states noted could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and cash flows. Any financial hardship and/or economic downturns in the financial industry, including a downturn similar to the financial crisis in 2007 through 2009, or in the states noted could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and cash flows. Certain provisions of the Company’s leases may be unenforceable. The Company’s rights and obligations with respect to its leases are governed by written agreements with its tenants. A court could determine that one or more provisions of such an agreement are unenforceable, such as a particular remedy, a termination provision, or a provision governing the Company’s remedies for default of the tenant. If we were unable to enforce provisions of a lease agreement or agreements, our results of operations, financial condition, and cash flows could be adversely impacted. We may not be able to dispose of properties we target for sale to recycle our capital. While the Company’s strategy may include selectively selling non-core assets or other income-producing properties to recycle our capital, we may be unable to sell such assets or properties targeted for disposition due to adverse market or other conditions or not achieve the pricing or timing that is consistent with our expectations. While the Company’s strategy may include selectively selling non-core or other income-producing properties to recycle our capital, we may be unable to sell properties targeted for disposition due to adverse market or other conditions or not achieve the pricing or timing that is consistent with our expectations. This may adversely affect, among other things, the Company’s ability to deploy capital into the acquisition of other income-producing properties, the execution of our overall operating strategy and consequently our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows. We may seek to conduct development activities, including the development of new income properties or the redevelopment or renovation of existing income properties, which may cause us to experience unexpected costs and have other risks that may adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and liquidity. ​We have recently and may in the future develop new income properties. In addition, we have in recent years and may in the future redevelop, significantly renovate or otherwise invest additional capital in certain of our existing income properties to improve the assets and enhance the opportunity for increased returns on our overall investment. These various development activities, particularly the development of new income properties, is subject to a number of risks, including risks associated with construction work and risks of cost overruns due to construction delays or other factors that may increase the expected costs of a project. Furthermore, the commencement of development projects is subject to other risks including the receipt of zoning or entitlements and other required governmental permits and authorizations. In addition, we may incur development costs in connection with projects that are ultimately not pursued to completion. Any of the development activities noted may be financed under our Credit Facility or through other forms of financing. If such financing is not available on acceptable terms, our development activities may not be pursued or may be curtailed. In addition, such development activities would likely reduce the available borrowing capacity on our Credit Facility which we use for the acquisition of income properties and other operating needs. The risks associated with development activities, including but not necessarily limited to those noted, could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations, and liquidity. ​Management of and Investment in PINE​Our revenues include receipt of management fees and potentially incentive fees derived from our provision of management services to PINE and the loss or failure, or decline in the business or assets, of PINE could substantially reduce our revenues.​Our revenues include the fees we earn from providing management services to PINE. The revenues we generate from managing PINE depend in large part on the ability of PINE to raise capital to invest in real estate assets and on the positive performance of PINE’s investments and stockholder returns. The revenues we generate from managing PINE depend in large part on the ability of PINE to raise capital to invest in real 20 Table of Contentsestate assets and on the positive performance of their investments and stockholder returns. The performance of PINE is subject to a number of risks and uncertainties. Therefore, a portion of our operating results and our ability to maintain and grow the fees we earn from providing management services to PINE depends upon the ability of PINE and its tenants to maintain and grow their respective businesses. Our ability to maintain and grow the fees we earn from providing management services to PINE also depend upon the ability of PINE to maintain and grow its market capitalization and to achieve positive stockholder returns in excess of applicable total stockholder return indexes. Our operating results and our ability to maintain and grow our revenues also depend upon the ability of PINE to maintain and grow their market capitalizations and to achieve positive stockholder returns in excess of applicable total stockholder return indexes. Reduced business activities, market capitalizations or stockholder returns, sales of assets or the failure of PINE or the termination of our management agreement with PINE 17 Table of Contentscould materially reduce our revenues and our profitability thereby adversely impacting our cash flows and results of operations. Reduced business activities, market capitalizations or stockholder returns, sales of assets or the failure of PINE or the termination of our management agreement with PINE could materially reduce our revenues and our profitability thereby adversely impacting our cash flows and results of operations. Our management agreement with PINE is subject to termination for events of default or non-performance, and any such termination could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.​Our management with PINE may be terminated by PINE in certain circumstances. Depending upon the circumstances of a termination, we may or may not be entitled to receive a termination fee. If our management agreement with PINE is terminated, we may be unable to replace the lost revenue. Even if we receive a termination fee upon the termination of the management agreement with PINE, we may be unable to invest the after tax proceeds from the termination fee we receive in opportunities that earn returns equal to or greater than the revenues lost as a result of the terminated management agreement. The termination of our management agreement with PINE could have a material adverse impact on our business, results of operations and financial condition.​An internalization of PINE’s management functions could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.In the future, PINE’s board of directors may consider internalizing the functions performed for PINE by us. We may be unable to replace the revenue that we would have received in the future in the absence of an internalization transaction. In the event that we and PINE agree to an internalization transaction, the payment of the internalization price to us would be in lieu of the payment of any termination fee. The internalization price would be payable in cash, shares of PINE’s common stock or OP Units, or a combination thereof, as determined by a majority of PINE’s independent directors in their sole discretion. Even if the internalization price paid to us in connection with an internalization is substantial, we cannot assure you that any cash, shares of PINE’s common stock or OP Units received in connection with an internalization transaction will ultimately lead to returns equal to or greater than the revenues lost as a result of the internalization transaction.Internalization transactions, including without limitation, transactions involving the acquisition of external advisors or property managers affiliated with entity sponsors have also, in some cases, been the subject of litigation. Even if these claims are without merit, we could be forced to spend significant amounts of money defending claims which would reduce the amount of funds available for us to invest in properties or other investments and to pay distributions to our stockholders. All of these factors could have a material adverse effect on us.​We may be unable to successfully operate PINE’s business.​We are paid a management fee to manage PINE’s business and we may be paid an incentive fee which will depend on numerous factors, including our ability to make investments on behalf of PINE that generate attractive, risk-adjusted returns, and thereby result in PINE’s stockholders achieving a necessary level of return. We will be paid a management fee to manage PINE’s business and we may be paid an incentive fee which will depend on numerous factors, including our ability to make investments on behalf of PINE that generate attractive, risk-adjusted returns, and thereby result in PINE’s stockholders achieving a necessary level of return. A key element of PINE’s success includes its ability to raise additional equity capital to fund its goals for growth. A key element of PINE’s success will likely include its ability to raise additional equity capital to fund its goals for growth. Our successful performance as the manager of PINE therefore depends, in part, on our ability to assist PINE in raising equity capital in amounts sufficient to support PINE’s goals and on acceptable terms. Our successful performance as the manager of PINE will therefore depend, in part, our ability to assist PINE in raising equity capital in amounts sufficient to support PINE’s goals and on acceptable terms. Our successful performance as the manager of PINE also depends on our ability to access debt financing for PINE, and on acceptable terms. Our successful performance as the manager of PINE will also depend on our ability to access financing for PINE, and on acceptable terms. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in this business, that PINE will achieve its objectives, will invest successfully in income properties and will generally operate successfully, or that we will earn fees from PINE sufficient to recover the costs we have incurred or to provide a suitable return on our investment in PINE. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in this business, that PINE will achieve its objectives, will invest successfully in income properties and 21 Table of Contentswill generally operate successfully, or that we will earn fees from PINE sufficient to recover the costs we have incurred or to provide a suitable return on our investment in PINE. Declines in the market values of our investment in PINE may adversely affect periodic reported results.​We hold a significant equity interest in PINE as of December 31, 2023 including the OP Units we hold in the PINE Operating Partnership as further described in Note 1, “Organization” in the notes to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8.​We hold a significant equity interest in PINE as of December 31, 2021, including the OP Units we hold in the PINE Operating Partnership as further described in Note 1, “Organization” in the notes to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8. PINE is publicly traded and as such, PINE’s common stock is subject to the risks associated with public equities, including, but not limited to, market risk broadly, risks associated with the REIT industry, and risks associated with the real estate industry more specifically. PINE is publicly traded and as such their common stock is subject to the risks associated with public equities, include, but are not limited to market risk broadly, risks associated with the REIT industry, and risks associated with the real estate industry more specifically. The public equity markets can be volatile, and the value of PINE’s stock and OP Units may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. The public equity markets can be volatile, and the value of PINE’s share may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. A significant decrease in the trading price of PINE’s stock 18 Table of Contentscould result in losses that have a material adverse effect on the value of our investment in PINE which could adversely impact our financial condition. A significant decrease in the trading price of PINE’s shares could result in losses that have a material adverse effect on the value of our investment in PINE which could adversely impact our financial condition. There are various potential conflicts of interest in our relationship with PINE, including our executive officers and/or directors who are also officers and/or directors of PINE, which could result in decisions that are not in the best interest of our stockholders.​We are subject to conflicts of interest that may exist or could arise in the future with PINE, including our executive officers and/or directors who are also directors or officers of PINE. Conflicts may include, without limitation: conflicts arising from the enforcement of agreements between us and PINE; conflicts in the amount of time that our officers and employees will spend on our affairs versus PINE's affairs; and conflicts in future transactions that we may pursue with PINE. Transactions between us and PINE would be subject to certain approvals of our directors; however, there can be no assurance that such approval will be successful in achieving terms and conditions as favorable to us as would be available from a third party. Our president and chief executive officer who is also one of our directors also serves on PINE's board of directors. Our president and chief executive officer who is also one of directors also serves on PINE's board of directors. ​Our directors and executive officers have duties to our company under applicable Maryland law, and our executive officers and our directors who are also directors or officers of PINE also have duties to PINE under applicable Maryland law. Those duties may come in conflict from time to time. We have duties as the manager of PINE which may come in conflict with our duties to our stockholders from time to time. In addition, conflicts of interest may exist or could arise in the future with our duties to PINE as its manager in connection with future investment opportunities.​Commercial Loans and InvestmentsA part of our investment strategy is focused on investing in commercial loans and investments which may involve credit risk or the risk that our borrowers will fail to pay scheduled contractual payments to us when due. As part of our business strategy, we have invested in commercial loans secured by commercial real estate and may in the future invest in other commercial loans or similar financings secured by real estate. Investments in commercial loans or similar financings of real estate involve credit risk with regard to the borrower, the borrower’s operations and the real estate that secures the financing. The credit risks include, but are not limited to, the ability of the borrower to execute their business plan and strategy, the ability of the borrower to sustain and/or improve the operating results generated by the collateral property, the ability of the borrower to continue as a going concern, and the risk associated with the market or industry in which the collateral property is utilized. Our evaluation of the investment opportunity in a mortgage loan or similar financing includes these elements of credit risk as well as other underwriting criteria and factors. Further, we may rely on third party resources to assist us in our investment evaluation process and otherwise in conducting customary due diligence. Our underwriting of the investment or our estimates of credit risk may not prove to be accurate, as actual results may vary from our estimates. In the event we underestimate the performance of the borrower and/or the underlying real estate which secures our commercial loan or financing, we may experience losses or unanticipated costs regarding our investment and our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows may be adversely impacted. Our commercial loans and investments segment is also exposed to risks associated with real estate investments generally.Any deterioration of real estate fundamentals generally, and in the United States in particular, could negatively impact the performance of our commercial loans and investments segment by making it more difficult for borrowers to satisfy their debt payment obligations, increasing the default risk applicable to borrowers and making it relatively more difficult for us to generate attractive risk-adjusted returns in our commercial loans and investments segment.

Real estate investments are subject to various risks, including the risks described elsewhere in this Form 10-K with respect to the properties that we own directly. Our borrowers may be impacted by these same risks, which may make it more difficult for them to satisfy their debt payment obligations to us.Our origination or acquisition of construction loans exposes us to an increased risk of loss.We have originated, and may in the future, originate or acquire additional construction loans. If we fail to fund our entire commitment on a construction loan or if a borrower otherwise fails to complete the construction of a project, there could be adverse consequences associated with the loan, including, but not limited to: a loss of the value of the property securing the loan, especially if the borrower is unable to raise funds to complete construction from other sources; a borrower claim against us for failure to perform under the loan documents; increased costs to the borrower that the 19 Table of Contentsborrower is unable to pay; a bankruptcy filing by the borrower; and abandonment by the borrower of the collateral for the loan. A borrower default on a construction loan where the property has not achieved completion poses a greater risk than a conventional loan, as completion would be required before the property is able to generate revenue. The process of foreclosing on a property is time-consuming, and we may incur significant expense if we foreclose on a property securing a loan under these or other circumstances.Our investments in construction loans require us to make estimates about the fair value of land improvements that may be challenged by the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”).We have originated and may in the future originate or acquire additional construction loans, the interest from which will be qualifying income for purposes of the REIT income tests, provided that the loan value of the real property securing the construction loan is equal to or greater than the highest outstanding principal amount of the construction loan during any taxable year. For purposes of construction loans, the loan value of the real property is the fair value of the land plus the reasonably estimated cost of the improvements or developments (other than personal property) that will secure the loan and that are to be constructed from the proceeds of the loan. There can be no assurance that the IRS would not challenge our estimate of the loan value of the real property.​Because of competition, we may not be able to acquire commercial loans or similar financings at all or at favorable yields. ​Because of competition, we may not be able to acquire commercial loans or similar financings at all or at favorable yields. ​When we seek to invest in commercial loans or similar financings secured by underlying real estate, we may not be able to acquire such loan investments at favorable spreads over our borrowing costs. ​If in the future we seek to invest in commercial loans or similar financings secured by underlying real estate, we may not be able to acquire such loan investments at favorable spreads over our borrowing costs. We compete with many other investment groups including other REITs, public and private investment funds, life insurance companies, commercial and investment banks and, commercial finance companies, including some of the third parties with which we expect to have relationships. We will compete with many other investment groups including other REITs, public and private investment funds, life insurance companies, 22 Table of Contentscommercial and investment banks and, commercial finance companies, including some of the third parties with which we expect to have relationships. In most instances the competition has greater financial capacity, are larger organizations and has a greater operating presence in the market. As a result, we may not be able to acquire commercial loans or similar financings in the future at all or at favorable spreads over our borrowing costs, which could adversely impact our results of operations and cash flows and would likely result in the need for any growth in our portfolio of income-producing assets to be achieved through the acquisition of income properties. Debt and preferred equity investments could cause us to incur expenses, which could adversely affect our results of operations. ​We have in the past, currently and will own in the future, investments in first mortgages, mezzanine loans, junior participations and preferred equity interests. ​We may own in the future investments in first mortgages, mezzanine loans, junior participations and preferred equity interests. Such investments may or may not be recourse obligations of the borrower and are not insured or guaranteed by governmental agencies or otherwise. In the event of a default under these obligations, we may have to take possession of the collateral securing these interests including through foreclosure proceedings. Borrowers may contest enforcement of foreclosure or our other remedies and may seek bankruptcy protection to potentially block our actions to enforce their obligations to us. Relatively high loan-to-value ratios and declines in the value of the underlying collateral property may prevent us from realizing an amount equal to our investment upon foreclosure or realization even if we make substantial improvements or repairs to the underlying real estate to maximize such property’s investment potential. Although we have maintained and regularly evaluated financial reserves to properly accrue for potential future losses, our reserves would reflect management’s judgment of the probability and severity of losses and the value of the underlying collateral. We cannot be certain that our judgment will prove to be correct and that our reserves, if any, will be adequate over time to protect against future losses due to unanticipated adverse changes in the economy or events adversely affecting specific properties, assets, tenants, borrowers, industries in which our tenants and borrowers operate or markets in which our tenants and borrowers, or their properties are located. If we are unable to enforce our contractual rights, including but not limited to, taking possession of the collateral property in a foreclosure circumstance, or our reserves for credit losses prove inadequate, we could suffer losses which would have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows. The mezzanine loan assets that we may acquire will involve greater risks of loss than senior loans secured by income-producing properties. ​We may acquire mezzanine loans, which generally take the form of subordinated loans secured by the underlying property or loans secured by a pledge of the ownership interests of either the entity owning the property or a pledge of the ownership interests of the entity that owns the interest in the entity owning the property. These types of assets involve a higher degree of risk than senior mortgage lending secured by income-producing real property, because the loan may 20 Table of Contentsbecome unsecured as a result of foreclosure by the senior lender. These types of assets involve a higher degree of risk than senior mortgage lending secured by income-producing real property, because the loan may become unsecured as a result of foreclosure by the senior lender. In the event of a bankruptcy of the entity providing the pledge of its ownership interests as security, we may not have full recourse to the assets of such entity, or the assets of the entity may not be sufficient to satisfy our mezzanine loan. If a borrower defaults on our mezzanine loan or the debt that is senior to our loan, or in the event of a borrower bankruptcy, our mezzanine loan will only be satisfied after the senior debt has been satisfied. As a result, we may not recover some or all of our initial investment. In addition, mezzanine loans may have higher loan-to-value ratios than conventional mortgage loans, resulting in less equity in the property and increasing the risk of loss of principal. Significant losses related to our mezzanine loans would result in operating losses for us and could adversely impact our financial condition and cash flows. We may invest in fixed-rate loan investments, and an increase in interest rates may adversely affect the value of these investments, which could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. ​Increases in interest rates may negatively affect the market value of our investments, particularly any fixed-rate commercial loans or other financings we have invested in. Generally, any fixed-rate commercial loans or other financings will be more negatively affected by rising interest rates than adjustable-rate assets. We are required to reduce the book value of our investments by the amount of any decrease in their fair value. Reductions in the fair value of our investments could decrease the amounts we may borrow to purchase additional commercial loans or similar financing investments, which could impact our ability to increase our operating results and cash flows. Reductions in the fair value of our investments could decrease the amounts we may borrow to purchase additional commercial loan or similar financing investments, which could impact our ability to increase our operating results and cash flows. Furthermore, if our borrowing costs are rising while our interest income is fixed for the fixed-rate investments, the spread between our borrowing costs and the fixed-rate we earn on the commercial loans or similar financing investments will contract or could become negative which would adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows. The commercial loans or similar financings we have acquired and may acquire in the future that are secured by commercial real estate typically depend on the ability of the property owner to generate income from operating the property. 23 Table of ContentsThe commercial loans or similar financings we may acquire that are secured by commercial real estate typically depend on the ability of the property owner to generate income from operating the property. Failure to do so may result in delinquency and/or foreclosure. ​Commercial loans are secured by commercial property and are subject to risks of delinquency and foreclosure and therefore risk of loss. The ability of a borrower to repay a loan secured by an income-producing property typically is dependent primarily upon the successful operation of such property rather than upon the existence of independent income or assets of the borrower. If the net operating income of the property is reduced, the borrower’s ability to repay the loan may be impaired. In the event of any default under a commercial loan held directly by us, we will bear a risk of loss of principal to the extent of any deficiency between the value of the collateral and the principal and accrued interest of the commercial loan, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, operating results and cash flows. In the event of the bankruptcy of a commercial loan borrower, the mortgage loan to such borrower will be deemed to be secured only to the extent of the value of the underlying collateral at the time of bankruptcy (as determined by the bankruptcy court), and the lien securing the loan will be subject to the avoidance powers of the bankruptcy trustee or debtor-in-possession to the extent the lien is unenforceable under state law. Foreclosure of a loan can be an expensive and lengthy process, which could have a substantial negative effect on our anticipated return on the foreclosed commercial loan. If the borrower is unable to repay a mortgage loan or similar financing our inability to foreclose on the asset in a timely manner, and/or our inability to obtain value from reselling or otherwise disposing of the asset for an amount equal to our investment basis, would adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows. The activities or actions of a third-party servicer engaged to service our investment in a commercial loan or similar debt financing could adversely impact the value of our investment or our results of operations and cash flows. ​Any future investments in first mortgages, mezzanine loans or other debt financings secured by real estate may require a third-party servicer to service the loan on our behalf and/or on behalf of third parties who have invested in some portion of the debt financing. An intended or unintended breach by the servicer with regard to their servicing of the debt financing or in their contractual obligations and fiduciary duties to us or the other holders of the debt financing could adversely impact the value of our investment or our results of operations and cash flows. ​21 Table of ContentsWe may suffer losses when a borrower defaults on a loan and the value of the underlying collateral is less than the amount due. We may suffer losses when a borrower defaults on a loan and the value of the underlying collateral is less than the amount due. ​If a borrower defaults on a non-recourse loan, we will only have recourse to the real estate-related assets collateralizing the loan. If the underlying collateral value is less than the loan amount, we will suffer a loss. Conversely, commercial loans we invest in may be unsecured or be secured only by equity interests in the borrowing entities. These loans are subject to the risk that other lenders in the capital stack may be directly secured by the real estate assets of the borrower or may otherwise have a superior right to repayment. Upon a default, those collateralized lenders would have priority over us with respect to the proceeds of a sale of the underlying real estate. In such cases, we may lack control over the underlying asset collateralizing our loan or the underlying assets of the borrower before a default and, as a result, the value of the collateral may be reduced by acts or omissions by owners or managers of the assets. In addition, the value of the underlying real estate may be adversely affected by some or all of the risks referenced above that pertain to the income-producing properties that we own. ​Commercial loans we may invest in may be backed by individual or corporate guarantees from borrowers or their affiliates which guarantees are not secured. If the guarantees are not fully or partially secured, we typically rely on financial covenants from borrowers and guarantors which are designed to require the borrower or guarantor to maintain certain levels of creditworthiness. Should we not have recourse to specific collateral pledged to satisfy such guarantees or recourse loans, we will have recourse as an unsecured creditor only to the general assets of the borrower or guarantor, some or all of which may be pledged as collateral for other lenders. There can be no assurance that a borrower or guarantor will comply with its financial covenants, or that sufficient assets will be available to pay amounts owed to us under our loans and guarantees. Because of these factors, we may suffer additional losses which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, operating results and cash flows. ​Upon a borrower bankruptcy, we may not have full recourse to the assets of the borrower to satisfy our loan. Additionally, in some instances, our loans may be subordinate to other debt of certain borrowers. If a borrower defaults on our loan or on debt senior to our loan, or a borrower files for bankruptcy, our loan will be satisfied only after the senior debt receives payment. Where debt senior to our loan exists, the presence of inter-creditor arrangements may limit our ability to amend our loan documents, assign our loans, accept prepayments, exercise our remedies (through “standstill” periods), and control decisions made in bankruptcy proceedings. Where debt senior to our loan exists, the presence of inter-creditor arrangements may limit our 24 Table of Contentsability to amend our loan documents, assign our loans, accept prepayments, exercise our remedies (through “standstill” periods), and control decisions made in bankruptcy proceedings. Bankruptcy and borrower litigation can significantly increase collection costs and the time needed for us to acquire title to the underlying collateral (if applicable), during which time the collateral and/or a borrower’s financial condition may decline in value, causing us to suffer additional losses. ​If the value of collateral underlying a loan declines, or interest rates increase during the term of a loan, a borrower may not be able to obtain the necessary funds to repay our loan at maturity through refinancing because the underlying property revenue cannot satisfy the debt service coverage requirements necessary to obtain new financing. If a borrower is unable to repay our loan at maturity, we could suffer additional loss which may adversely impact our financial condition, operating results and cash flows. ​As a result of any of the above factors or events, the losses we may suffer could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. ​We could fail to continue to qualify as a REIT if the IRS successfully challenges our treatment of any mezzanine loans in which we invest.​We may, in the future, originate or acquire mezzanine loans, which are loans secured by equity interests in an entity that directly or indirectly owns real property, rather than by a direct mortgage of the real property. In Revenue Procedure 2003-65, the IRS established a safe harbor under which loans secured by a first priority security interest in ownership interests in a partnership or limited liability company owning real property will be treated as real estate assets for purposes of the REIT asset tests, and interest derived from those loans will be treated as qualifying income for both the 75% and 95% gross income tests, provided several requirements are satisfied. Although Revenue Procedure 2003-65 provides a safe harbor on which taxpayers may rely, it does not prescribe rules of substantive tax law. Moreover, our mezzanine loans may not meet all of the requirements for reliance on the safe harbor. Consequently, there can be no assurance that the IRS will not challenge our treatment of such loans as qualifying real estate assets, which could adversely affect our ability to continue to qualify as a REIT.​22 Table of ContentsOther Investments​Investments in securities of companies operating in the real estate industry, including debt and equity instruments such as corporate bonds, preferred or common stock, or convertible instruments could cause us to incur losses or other expenses which could adversely affect our financial position, results of operations, and cash flows. ​Other Investments​Investments in securities of companies operating in the real estate industry, including debt and equity instruments such as corporate bonds, preferred or common stock, or convertible instruments could cause us to incur losses or other expenses which could adversely affect our financial position, results of operations, and cash flows. ​We currently own, and may own in the future, investments in corporate securities of companies operating in the real estate industry including debt and equity instruments such as corporate bonds, preferred or common stock, or convertible instruments. Certain of these investments may be traded on an exchange or other active market whereby the price of the underlying instrument is quoted daily and those quoted prices and thus the market value of the instrument varies during a given trading day. Certain of these investments may be traded on an exchange or market that is not deemed an active market but where the price of the investment fluctuates daily or otherwise. Adverse fluctuations in the value of these investments, whether market-generated or not, are reflected as unrealized losses on our balance sheet. We may choose to or be required to liquidate these investments in whole or in part and at prices that result in realized losses on our investment. Should we incur realized losses on liquidating these investments, our financial position, results of operations and cash flows would be adversely impacted. ​General We are subject to a number of risks inherent with the real estate industry and in the ownership of real estate assets or investment in financings secured by real estate, which may adversely affect our returns from our investments, our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. ​Factors beyond our control can affect the performance and value of our real estate assets including our income properties, investments in commercial loans or similar financings secured by real estate or other investments, and our Subsurface Interests. Real estate assets are subject to various risks, including but not limited to the following: ​●Adverse changes in national, regional, and local economic and market conditions where our properties or the properties underlying a loan investment are located; ●Competition from other real estate companies similar to ours and competition for tenants, including competition based on rental rates, age and location of the property and the quality of maintenance, insurance, and management services; ●Changes in tenant preferences that reduce the attractiveness and marketability of our income properties to tenants or decreases in market rental rates; ●Zoning or other local regulatory restrictions, or other factors pertaining to the local government institutions which inhibit interest in the markets in which our income-producing assets are located; ●Costs associated with the need to periodically repair, renovate or re-lease our income properties; ●Increases in the cost of our operations, particularly maintenance, insurance, or real estate taxes which may occur even when circumstances such as market factors and competition cause a reduction in our revenues; ●Changes in governmental laws and regulations, fiscal policies and zoning ordinances and the related costs of compliance with laws and regulations, fiscal policies, and ordinances; ●Commodities prices;●Illiquidity of real estate investments which may limit our ability to modify our income-producing asset portfolios promptly in response to changes in economic or other conditions; ●Acts of God, including natural disasters, which may result in uninsured losses; and ●Acts of war or terrorism, including consequences of terrorist attacks. ​If any of these or similar events occurs, it may reduce our return from an affected real estate asset or investment which could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. The Company’s real estate investments are generally illiquid. ​Real estate investments, including investments in income properties, joint ventures and Subsurface Interests, are relatively illiquid; therefore, it may be difficult for us to sell such assets if the need or desire arises, and otherwise the Company’s ability to make rapid adjustments in the size and content of our income property portfolio or other real estate assets in response to economic or other conditions is limited. ​Real estate investments, including investments in income properties, joint ventures and subsurface interests, are relatively illiquid; therefore, it may be difficult for us to sell such assets if the need or desire arises, and otherwise the Company’s ability to make rapid adjustments in the size and content of our income property portfolio or other real estate assets in response to economic or other conditions is limited. Illiquid assets typically experience greater price volatility, as a ready market does not exist, and can be more difficult to value. In addition, validating third party pricing for illiquid 23 Table of Contentsassets may be more subjective than more liquid assets. In addition, validating third party pricing for illiquid assets may be more subjective than more liquid assets. As a result, if we are required to quickly liquidate all or a portion of certain of our real estate assets or income-producing assets, we may realize significantly less than the value at which we have previously recorded our assets. Further, certain expenditures necessary to operate our income property operations generally do not decrease and may in fact increase in response to weakening economic conditions or other market disruptions, which expenditures may include maintenance costs, insurance costs and, in some instances, interest expense. This relationship of revenue and expenditures may result, under certain market conditions, in declining operating results and reduced cash flows and thereby could have an adverse effect on the Company’s financial condition. We may experience a decline in the fair value of our real estate assets or investments which could result in impairments and would impact our financial condition and results of operations. ​A decline in the fair market value of our long-lived assets may require us to recognize an “other-than-temporary” impairment against such assets (as defined by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) authoritative accounting guidance) if certain conditions or circumstances related to an asset were to change and we were to determine that, with respect to any such asset, there was an unrealized loss to the fair value of the asset. The fair value of our long-lived assets depends on market conditions, including estimates of future demand for these assets, and the revenues that can be generated from such applicable assets including land or an income property. If such a determination were to be made, we would recognize the estimated unrealized losses through earnings and write down the depreciated or amortized cost of such assets to a new cost basis, based on the fair value of such assets on the date they are considered to be other-than-temporarily impaired. Such impairment charges reflect non-cash losses at the time of recognition; subsequent disposition or sale of such assets could further affect our future losses or gains, as they are based on the difference between the sales price received and the adjusted depreciated or amortized cost of such assets at the time of sale. ​Downturns in the U.S. economy and real estate markets have at times caused the fair value of certain of our properties to decrease. If the real estate market were to experience another decline, we may be required to take write-downs against our earnings for other than temporary impairments in the value of our real estate assets including our income properties, commercial loans and investments and similar financings or other capitalized costs. Any such non-cash charges could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. From time to time we make investments in companies over which we do not have control. Some of these companies may operate in industries that differ from our current operations, with different risks than investing in real estate.​From time to time we make debt or equity investments in other companies that we may not control or over which we may not have sole control. Although these businesses generally have a significant real estate component, some of them may operate in businesses that are different from our primary business segments. Consequently, investments in these businesses, among other risks, subject us to the operating and financial risks of industries other than real estate and to the risk that we do not have sole control over the operations of these businesses.​From time to time we may make additional investments in or acquire other entities that may subject us to similar risks. Investments in entities over which we do not have sole control, including joint ventures, present additional risks such as having differing objectives than our partners or the entities in which we invest, or becoming involved in disputes, or competing with those persons. In addition, we rely on the internal controls and financial reporting controls of these entities and their failure to maintain effectiveness or comply with applicable standards may adversely affect us.Quarterly results may fluctuate and may not be indicative of future quarterly performance.​Our quarterly operating results could fluctuate; therefore, reliance should not be placed on past quarterly results as indicative of our performance in future quarters. Factors that could cause quarterly operating results to fluctuate include, among others, variations in the performance of our income-producing assets, market values of our investment in PINE, costs associated with debt, general economic conditions, the state of the real estate and financial markets and the degree to which we encounter competition in our markets.24 Table of ContentsRisks related to Our Financing ​General​The Company may be unable to obtain debt or equity capital on favorable terms, if at all, or additional borrowings may impact our liquidity or ability to monetize any assets securing such borrowings.Risks related to Our Financing ​General​The Company may be unable to obtain debt or equity capital on favorable terms, if at all, or additional borrowings may impact our liquidity or ability to monetize any assets securing such borrowings. ​In order to further our business objectives, we have in the past and expect to continue to seek to obtain additional debt financing or raise equity capital and may be unable to do so on favorable terms, if at all. ​In order to further our business objectives, we may seek to obtain additional debt financing or raise equity capital and may be unable to do so on favorable terms, if at all. We may obtain unsecured debt financing in addition to our Credit Facility which could decrease our borrowing capacity under the Credit Facility. Other sources of available capital may be more expensive or available under terms that are more restrictive than the Company’s existing debt capital. Any of these occurrences could adversely affect the Company’s business, financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows. ​An increase in our borrowing costs would adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. ​While we have no short-term maturities in our long-term debt, should we seek to incur additional debt to help finance our acquisitions, increased interest rates would reduce the difference, or spread, that we may earn between the yield on the investments we make and the cost of the leverage we employ to finance such investments. It is possible that the spread on investments could be reduced to a point at which the profitability from investments would be significantly reduced or eliminated entirely. It is possible that the spread on investments could be reduced to a point at which the profitability from investments would be significantly reduced or 27 Table of Contentseliminated entirely. This would adversely affect our returns on our assets, and therefore adversely impact our financial condition, our results of operations, and cash flows, and could require us to liquidate certain or all of these assets. ​Servicing our debt requires a significant amount of cash, and we may not have sufficient cash flow from our business to service or pay our debt. ​Our ability to make scheduled payments of the principal of, to pay interest on, to pay any cash due upon conversion of, or to refinance our indebtedness, including the Company’s $51.0 million aggregate principal amount of 3.875% Convertible Senior Notes due 2025 (the “2025 Notes”), depends on our future operating and financial performance, which is subject to economic, financial, competitive and other factors beyond our control. Our business may not continue to generate cash flow from operations in the future sufficient to service our debt and make necessary capital expenditures. If we are unable to generate such cash flow, we may be required to adopt one or more alternatives, such as selling assets, restructuring debt or obtaining additional equity capital on terms that may be onerous or highly dilutive. Our ability to refinance our indebtedness will depend on the capital markets and our financial condition at such time. We may not be able to engage in any of these activities or engage in these activities on desirable terms, which could result in a default on our debt obligations. Our level of indebtedness could have significant adverse consequences and our cash flow may be insufficient to meet our debt service obligations.​Our level of indebtedness, as further described in Note 16 “Long-Term Debt” in the notes to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8, could have significant adverse consequences on our business and operations, including the following:​●it may increase our vulnerability to changes in economic conditions (including increases in interest rates) and limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and/or industry;●we may be at a disadvantage compared to our competitors with comparatively less indebtedness;●we may be unable to hedge our debt, or such hedges may fail or expire, leaving us exposed to potentially volatile interest or currency exchange rates; and●we may be unable to refinance our indebtedness or obtain additional financing as needed or on favorable terms.​Our ability to generate sufficient cash flow determines whether we will be able to (i) meet our existing or potential future debt service obligations; (ii) refinance our existing or potential future indebtedness; and (iii) fund our operations, working capital, acquisitions, capital expenditures, and other important business uses. Our future cash flow is subject to many factors beyond our control and we cannot assure you that our business will generate sufficient cash flow from operations, or that future sources of cash will be available to us on favorable terms, to meet all of our debt service obligations and fund our other important business uses or liquidity needs. As a result, we may be forced to take other 25 Table of Contentsactions to meet those obligations, such as selling properties, raising equity, or delaying capital expenditures, any of which may not be feasible or could have a material adverse effect on us. As a result, we may be forced to take other actions to meet those obligations, such as selling properties, raising equity, or delaying capital expenditures, any of which may not be feasible or could have a material adverse effect on us. We continue to have the ability to incur debt; if we incur substantial additional debt, the higher levels of debt may affect our ability to pay the interest and principal of our debt. ​Despite our current consolidated debt levels, we and our subsidiaries may incur substantial additional debt in the future (subject to the restrictions contained in our debt instruments), some of which may be secured debt. The indenture governing our 2025 Notes does not restrict our ability to incur additional indebtedness, whether secured or unsecured, or require us to maintain financial ratios or specified levels of net worth or liquidity. If we incur substantial additional indebtedness in the future, these higher levels of indebtedness may affect our ability to pay the principal of, and interest on, our outstanding debt and our creditworthiness generally.Declines in the value of the assets in which we invest will adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations and make it costlier to finance these assets. ​Generally, we use our income property investments as collateral for our financings or as the borrowing base for our Credit Facility. Any decline in their value, a significant decrease in the rent received from the portfolio, or perceived market uncertainty about the value of our income properties, could make it difficult for us to obtain or renew financing on favorable terms or at all, or maintain our compliance with terms of any financing arrangements already in place. We have in the past and expect to continue to utilize derivative instruments to hedge risk, which may adversely affect our borrowing cost and expose us to other risks.​The derivative instruments we have used in the past and expect to continue to use in the future are and could be in the form of interest rate swaps, interest rate caps and or interest rate collars. Interest rate swaps effectively change variable-rate debt obligations to fixed-rate debt obligations or fixed-rate debt obligations to variable-rate debt obligations. Interest rate caps limit our exposure to rising interest rates. Interest rate collars limit our exposure to rising interest rates while also limited our benefit from declining interest rates.​Our use of derivative instruments also involves the risk that a counterparty to a hedging arrangement could default on its obligation and the risk that we may have to pay certain costs, such as transaction fees or breakage costs, if a hedging arrangement is terminated by us. To limit the risk of counterparty default, we generally seek to enter into hedging arrangements with counterparties that are large, creditworthy financial institutions typically rated at least "A/A2" by S&P and Moody's, respectively.​Developing an effective strategy for dealing with alterations in interest rates is complex and any strategy aimed at managing exposures to changing interest rates would likely not be able to completely insulate us from risks associated with such fluctuations. There can be no assurance that any hedging activities will have the desired beneficial impact on our results of operations or financial condition.Increases in interest rates could have an adverse effect on our operating results.​Our operating results depend in part on the difference between the income achieved from our income-producing assets and management fee income streams and the interest expense incurred in connection with our interest-bearing liabilities. Changes in the general level of interest rates prevailing in the financial markets have in the past affected and may in the future affect the spread between our income-producing assets and management fee income streams and our interest-bearing liabilities subject to the impact of interest rate floors and caps, as well as the amounts of floating rate assets and liabilities. Changes in the general level of interest rates prevailing in the financial markets will affect the spread between our income-producing assets and management fee income streams and our interest-bearing liabilities subject to the impact of interest rate floors and caps, as well as the amounts of floating rate assets and liabilities. Any significant compression of the spreads between income-producing assets and management fee income streams and interest-bearing liabilities could have a material adverse effect on us. While interest rates remain low relative to certain historical rates, rates have recently risen and are generally expected to rise in the coming years, although there is no certainty as to the amount by which they may rise. While interest rates remain low by historical standards, rates have recently risen and are generally expected to rise in the coming years, although there is no certainty as to the amount by which they may rise. Interest rates are highly sensitive to many factors, including governmental monetary and tax policies, domestic and international economic and political conditions, inflation, labor markets, and other factors beyond our control. Interest rates are highly sensitive to many factors, including governmental monetary and tax policies, domestic and international economic and political conditions, and other factors beyond our control. In the event of a rising interest rate environment, rates could create a mismatch between the income we generate from our income-producing assets and management fee income streams and the interest expense incurred on our floating rate debt that could have a significant adverse effect on our financial condition, 26 Table of Contentsour operating results and, our cash flows. In the event of a significant rising interest rate environment, rates could create a mismatch between the income we generate from our income-producing assets and management fee income streams and the interest expense incurred on our floating rate debt that could have a significant adverse effect on our financial condition, our operating results and, our cash flows. An increase in interest rates could also, among other things, reduce the value of certain of our income-producing assets and our ability to realize gains from the sale of such assets. ​Our Credit Facility ​The Company’s Credit Facility and secured financings include certain financial and/or other covenants that could restrict our operating activities, and the failure to comply with such covenants could result in a default that accelerates the required payment of such debt. ​The Credit Facility contains certain financial and operating covenants, including, among other things, certain coverage ratios and limitations on our ability to incur debt and limits on the repurchase of the Company’s stock and similar restrictions. In addition, the Credit Facility contains certain covenants pertaining to maximum levels of investment in certain types of assets, the number and make-up of the properties in the borrowing base, and similar covenants typical for this type of indebtedness. The Company’s secured indebtedness generally contains covenants regarding debt service coverage ratios. The Company’s ability to meet or maintain compliance with these and other debt covenants may be dependent on the performance of the Company’s tenants under their leases. The Company’s failure to comply with certain of our debt covenants could result in a default that may, if not cured, accelerate our payment obligations under such debt and limit the Company’s available cash flow for acquisitions, dividends, or operating costs, which would likely have a material adverse impact on the Company’s financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows. In addition, these defaults could impair the Company’s access to the debt and equity markets. ​Our Convertible Notes Certain investors in the convertible debt issuance may also invest in our common stock utilizing trading strategies which may increase the volatility in or adversely affect the trading price and liquidity of our common stock. ​Investors in, and potential purchasers of, the 2025 Notes may employ, or seek to employ, a convertible arbitrage strategy with respect to the 2025 Notes. Investors that employ a convertible arbitrage strategy with respect to our convertible debt instruments typically implement that strategy by selling short the common stock underlying the 2025 Notes and dynamically adjusting their short position while they hold the 2025 Notes. Investors may also implement this strategy by entering into swaps on our common stock in lieu of or in addition to short selling our common stock. These strategies, particularly the effect short sales or equity swaps with respect to our common stock, could increase the volatility of our stock price or otherwise adversely affect the trading price of our common stock. We may not have the liquidity or ability to raise the funds necessary to settle conversions of the 2025 Notes or purchase the 2025 Notes as required upon a fundamental change, and our future debt may contain limitations on our ability to pay cash upon a purchase or conversion of the 2025 Notes. ​Following certain potential events qualifying as a fundamental change under the indenture governing the 2025 Notes, including a change in control, holders of 2025 Notes will have the right to require us to purchase their 2025 Notes for cash. A fundamental change may also constitute an event of default or a prepayment event under, and result in the acceleration of the maturity of, our then-existing indebtedness. In addition, upon conversion of the 2025 Notes, unless we elect to deliver solely shares of our common stock to settle such conversion (other than paying cash in lieu of delivering any fractional share), we will be required to make cash payments in respect of the 2025 Notes being converted. In addition, upon conversion of the 2025 Notes, unless we elect to 30 Table of Contentsdeliver solely shares of our common stock to settle such conversion (other than paying cash in lieu of delivering any fractional share), we will be required to make cash payments in respect of the 2025 Notes being converted. There is no assurance that we will have sufficient financial resources, or will be able to arrange financing, to pay the fundamental change purchase price or make cash payments upon conversion. In addition, restrictions in our then existing credit facilities or other indebtedness, if any, may not allow us to purchase the 2025 Notes upon a fundamental change or make cash payments upon conversion. Our failure to purchase the 2025 Notes upon a fundamental change or make cash payments upon conversion thereof when required would result in an event of default with respect to the 2025 Notes which could, in turn, constitute a default under the terms of our other indebtedness, if any. If the repayment of the related indebtedness were to be accelerated after any applicable notice or grace periods, we may not have sufficient funds to repay the indebtedness and purchase the 2025 Notes or make cash payments upon conversions thereof. ​27 Table of ContentsTo the extent we issue shares of our common stock to satisfy all or a portion of the settlement of our 2025 Notes, conversions of the 2025 Notes will dilute the ownership interest of our existing stockholders, including holders who had previously converted their 2025 Notes into common stock. To the extent we issue shares of our common stock to satisfy all or a portion of the settlement of our 2025 Notes, conversions of the 2025 Notes will dilute the ownership interest of our existing stockholders, including holders who had previously converted their 2025 Notes into common stock. ​To the extent we issue shares of our common stock to satisfy all or a portion of our conversion obligation pursuant to the 2025 Notes, the conversion of some or all of the 2025 Notes into common stock will dilute the ownership interests of our existing stockholders. Any sales in the public market of our common stock issuable upon such conversion could adversely affect prevailing market prices of our common stock. In addition, the existence of the 2025 Notes may encourage short selling by market participants because the conversion of the 2025 Notes could depress the price of our common stock. The fundamental change purchase feature of our 2025 Notes may delay or prevent an otherwise beneficial attempt to take over our company. ​The terms of the 2025 Notes require us to offer to purchase the 2025 Notes for cash in the event of a fundamental change, as defined in the indenture agreement of the 2025 Notes. A non-stock takeover of the Company may trigger the requirement that we purchase the 2025 Notes. This feature may have the effect of delaying or preventing a takeover of the Company that would otherwise be beneficial to investors. The accounting method for our 2025 Notes, which may be settled in cash, may have a material effect on our reported financial results. ​Under Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 470-20, Debt with Conversion and Other Options, which we refer to as ASC 470-20, an entity must separately account for the liability and equity components of the convertible debt instruments (such as the 2025 Notes) that may be settled entirely or partially in cash upon conversion in a manner that reflects the issuer’s economic interest cost. The effect of ASC 470-20 on the accounting for the 2025 Notes is that the equity component is required to be included in the additional paid-in capital section of stockholders’ equity on our consolidated balance sheet, and the value of the equity component would be treated as original issue discount for purposes of accounting for the debt component of the 2025 Notes. As a result, we will be required to record a greater amount of non-cash interest expense in current periods presented because of the amortization of the discounted carrying value of the 2025 Notes to their face amount over the term of the 2025 Notes. We will report lower net income (or greater net loss) in our financial results because ASC 470-20 requires interest to include both the current period’s amortization of the debt discount and the instrument’s coupon interest, which could adversely affect our reported or future financial results, and/or the market price of our common stock. ​Effective January 1, 2022, the Company adopted ASU 2020-06 whereby diluted EPS includes the dilutive impact of the 2025 Notes (hereinafter defined) using the if-converted method. Upon adoption, the Company recorded a $7.0 million adjustment to reduce additional paid-in capital to eliminate the non-cash equity component of the 2025 Notes with corresponding offsets including (i) a $4.0 million cumulative effect adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings and (ii) a $3.0 million adjustment to eliminate the non-cash portion of the convertible notes discount, net of accumulated amortization (the “2025 Notes Adjustment”). The 2025 Notes Adjustment was made on January 1, 2022, and is reflected in the accompanying consolidated statements of stockholders’ equity.​Risks Associated with Certain Events, Environmental Issues and, Climate ChangeOur operations and properties could be adversely affected in the event of natural disasters, pandemics, or other significant disruptions.​31 Table of ContentsRisks Associated with Certain Events, Environmental Issues and, Climate ChangeOur operations and properties could be adversely affected in the event of natural disasters, pandemics, or other significant disruptions. ​Our corporate headquarters and many of our properties are located in Florida, where major hurricanes have occurred. We have income properties in other states or regions that experience similar or other natural disasters. Depending on where any hurricane makes landfall, our properties in Florida could experience significant damage. In addition, the occurrence and frequency of hurricanes in Florida could also negatively impact demand for our real estate assets because of consumer perceptions of hurricane risks. In addition to hurricanes, the occurrence of other natural disasters and climate conditions in Florida and other states, such as tornadoes, floods, fires, unusually heavy or prolonged rain, droughts, and heat waves, could have an adverse effect on our ability to develop properties or realize income from our properties. In addition to the various forms of natural disasters that could impact our operations and the performance of our income producing assets, pandemics occurring throughout the world could lead to disruptions in the global economy or significant economies throughout the world which could adversely impact our tenant’s operations, their ability to pay rent and consequently our 28 Table of Contentsfinancial condition, results of operations and cash flows may be adversely impacted. If a hurricane, earthquake, natural disaster, health pandemic or other similar significant disruption occurs, we may experience disruptions to our operations and damage to our properties, which could have an adverse effect on our business, our financing condition, our results of operations, and our cash flows. Acts of violence, terrorist attacks or war may affect the markets in which the Company operates and adversely affect the Company’s results of operations and cash flows. ​Terrorist attacks or other acts of violence may negatively affect the Company’s operations. There can be no assurance that there will not be terrorist attacks against businesses within the United States. These attacks may directly impact the Company’s physical assets or business operations or the financial condition of its tenants, lenders or other institutions with which the Company has a relationship. The United States may be engaged in armed conflict, which could have an impact on these parties. The consequences of armed conflict are unpredictable, and the Company may not be able to foresee events that could have an adverse effect on its business. More generally, the occurrence of any of these events or the threat of these events, could cause consumer confidence and spending to decrease or result in increased volatility in the United States and worldwide financial markets and economies. They also could result in or cause an economic recession in the United States or abroad. Any of these occurrences could have an adverse impact on the Company’s financial condition, results of operations or cash flows. We may encounter environmental problems which require remediation or the incurrence of significant costs to resolve, which could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows. ​Under various federal, state and local laws, ordinances and regulations, we may be required to investigate and clean up certain hazardous or toxic substances released on or in properties we own or operate or that we previously owned or operated, and we may be required to pay other costs relating to hazardous or toxic substances. ​Under various federal, state and local laws, ordinances and regulations, we may be required to investigate and clean up certain hazardous or toxic substances released on or in properties we own or operate or that we previously owned or operated, and we may be required to pay other costs relating to hazardous or toxic substances or incur costs or obligatio