Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - CANN

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ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS.

Investing in our Common Stock involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the following risks and all other information contained in this Form 10-K, including our consolidated financial statements and the related notes, before investing in our Common Stock. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones we face, but include the most significant factors currently known by us that make investing in our Common Stock speculative or risky. Additional risks and uncertainties that we are unaware of, or that we currently believe are not material, also may become important factors that affect us. If any of the following risks materialize, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially harmed. In that case, the trading price of our Common Stock could decline, and you may lose some or all of your investment. In that case, the trading price of our common stock could decline, and you may lose some or all of your investment.

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

We have a limited operating history in an evolving industry, which makes it difficult to accurately assess our future growth prospects.

We operate in an evolving industry that may not develop as expected. Furthermore, our operations continue to evolve under our business plan as we continually assess new strategic opportunities for our business within our industry. Assessing the future prospects of our business is challenging considering both known and unknown risks and difficulties we may encounter. Growth prospects in our industry can be affected by a wide variety of factors including:

Competition from other similar companies;

Regulatory limitations on the products we can offer and markets we can serve;

Other changes in the regulation of medical and recreational cannabis use;

Changes in underlying consumer behavior, which may affect the business of our customers;

Our ability to access adequate financing on reasonable terms and our ability to raise additional capital to fund our operations;

Challenges with new products, services, and markets; and

Fluctuations in the credit markets and demand for credit.

We may not be able to successfully address these factors, which could negatively impact our growth, harm our business, and cause our operating results to be worse than expected.

We have a history of losses and may not achieve profitability in the future.

We generated net losses of approximately $7.1 million and $9.5 million, respectively, in the years ended December 31, 2023 and 2022. As of December 31, 2023, we had an accumulated deficit of approximately $100.5 million. We will need to generate and sustain increased revenues in future periods to become profitable, and, even if we do, we may not be able to maintain or increase any such level of profitability.

As we grow, we expect to continue to expend substantial financial and other resources on:

personnel, including significant increases to the total compensation we pay our employees as we grow our employee headcount;

expenses relating to increased marketing efforts;

strategic acquisitions of businesses and real estate; and

general administration, including legal, accounting, and other compliance expenses related to being a public company.

These expenditures are expected to increase and may adversely affect our ability to achieve and sustain profitability as we grow. Our efforts to grow our business may also be more costly than we expect, and we may not be able to increase our revenues enough to offset our higher operating expenses. We may incur losses in the future for several reasons, including the other risks described in this Report, unforeseen expenses, difficulties, complications and delays, and other unknown events. If we are unable to achieve and sustain profitability, the market price of our Common Stock may significantly decrease.

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Cannabis remains illegal under federal law, and any change in the enforcement priorities of the federal government could render our current and planned future operations unprofitable or even prohibit such operations.

The cultivation, manufacture, distribution, and possession of marijuana continues to be illegal under U.S. federal law. The Supremacy Clause of the United States Constitution establishes that the US Constitution and federal laws made pursuant to it are paramount and, in case of conflict between federal and state law, the federal law must be applied. Accordingly, federal law applies even in those states in which the use of marijuana has been legalized. Enforcement of federal law regarding marijuana would harm our business, prospects, results of operation, and financial condition.

The United States federal government regulates drugs through the Controlled Substances Act (the “CSA”), which places controlled substances, including cannabis, on one of five schedules. Cannabis is currently classified as a Schedule I controlled substance, which is viewed as having a high potential for abuse and having no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. No prescriptions may be written for Schedule I substances, and such substances are subject to production quotas imposed by the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (the “DEA”). Because of this, doctors may not prescribe cannabis for medical use under federal law, although they can recommend its use under the First Amendment.

Currently, numerous U.S. states, the District of Columbia and U.S. territories have legalized cannabis for medical and/or recreational adult use. Such state and territorial laws conflict with the federal CSA, which makes cannabis use and possession illegal at the federal level. Such state and territorial laws conflict with the federal CSA, which makes cannabis use and possession illegal at the federal level. Because cannabis is a Schedule I controlled substance, however, the development of a legal cannabis industry under the laws of these states conflicts with the CSA, which makes cannabis use and possession illegal on a national level. The United States Supreme Court has confirmed that the federal government has the right to regulate and criminalize cannabis, including for medical purposes, and that federal law criminalizing the use of cannabis preempts state laws that legalize its use. We would likely be unable to execute our business plan if the federal government were to strictly enforce federal law regarding cannabis. We would likely be unable to execute our business plan if the federal government were to strictly enforce federal law regarding cannabis.

Considering such conflict between federal laws and state laws regarding cannabis, the administration under President Obama had effectively stated that it was not an efficient use of resources to direct law federal law enforcement agencies to prosecute those lawfully abiding by state-designated laws allowing the use and distribution of medical cannabis. For example, the DOJ Deputy Attorney General of the Obama administration, James M. Cole, issued a memorandum (the “Cole Memo”) to all United States Attorneys providing updated guidance to federal prosecutors concerning cannabis enforcement under the CSA (see “Business—Government and Industry Regulation—The Cole Memo”). In addition, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”) provided guidelines on February 14, 2014, regarding how financial institutions can provide services to cannabis-related businesses consistent with their Bank Secrecy Act obligations (see “Business—Government and Industry Regulation—FinCEN”).

Congress previously enacted an omnibus spending bill that included a provision (the “Rohrabacher-Blumenauer Amendment”) prohibiting the DOJ from using funds to prevent states with medical cannabis laws from implementing such laws. This provision is renewed annually by Congress and is current through September 30, 2023. In August 2016, a Ninth Circuit federal appeals court ruled in United States v. McIntosh that the Rohrabacher-Blumenauer Amendment bars the DOJ from spending funds on the prosecution of conduct that is allowed by state medical cannabis laws, provided that such conduct is in strict compliance with applicable state law. In March 2015, bipartisan legislation titled the Compassionate Access, Research Expansion, and Respect States Act (the “CARERS Act”) was introduced, proposing to allow states to regulate the medical use of cannabis by changing applicable federal law, including by reclassifying cannabis under the Controlled Substances Act to a Schedule II controlled substance and thereby changing the plant from a federally-criminalized substance to one that has recognized medical uses. More recently, the Respect State Marijuana Laws Act of 2017 has been introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives, which proposes to exclude persons who produce, possess, distribute, dispense, administer, or deliver marijuana in compliance with state laws from the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal penalties of the CSA.

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These developments previously were met with a certain amount of optimism in the cannabis industry, but (i) neither the CARERS Act nor the Respect State Marijuana Laws Act of 2017 have yet been adopted, (ii) the Rohrabacher-Blumenauer Amendment, being an amendment to an appropriations bill that must be renewed annually, has not currently been renewed beyond March 11, 2022, and (iii) the ruling in United States v. McIntosh is only applicable precedent in the Ninth Circuit, which does not include Colorado, the state where we currently primarily operate.

Furthermore, on January 4, 2018, former U.S. Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, issued a memorandum for all U.S. Attorneys (the “Sessions Memo”) stating that the Cole Memo was rescinded effectively immediately. In particular, Mr. Sessions stated that “prosecutors should follow the well-established principles that govern all federal prosecutions,” which require “federal prosecutors deciding which cases to prosecute to weigh all relevant considerations, including federal law enforcement priorities set by the Attorney General, the seriousness of the crime, the deterrent effect of criminal prosecution, and the cumulative impact of particular crimes on the community.” The Sessions Memo went on to state that given the DOJ’s well-established general principles, “previous nationwide guidance specific to marijuana is unnecessary and is rescinded, effective immediately.” The Sessions Memo went on to 13 Table of Contentsstate that given the DOJ’s well-established general principles, “previous nationwide guidance specific to marijuana is unnecessary and is rescinded, effective immediately.

In response to the Sessions Memo, U.S. Attorney Bob Troy for the District of Colorado, the state in which our principal business operations are presently located, issued a statement on January 4, 2018, stating that the United States Attorney’s Office in Colorado is already guided by the well-established principles referenced in the Sessions Memo, “focusing in particular on identifying and prosecuting those who create the greatest safety threats to our communities around the state. We will, consistent with the Attorney General’s latest guidance, continue to take this approach in all our work with our law enforcement partners throughout Colorado.”

It is unclear at this time whether the Sessions Memo will be rescinded by the Biden administration, and/or the Cole Memo reinstated; nor is it clear whether the Biden administration will strongly enforce the federal laws applicable to cannabis or what types of activities will be targeted for enforcement. US Attorney General Merrick Garland has indicated his desire to reinstitute a version of the Cole Memo; however, this has not yet occurred. US Attorney General Merrick Garland has indicated his desire to reinstitute a version of the Cole Memo; however, this has not yet occurred. Any significant change in the federal government’s enforcement policy with respect to current federal laws applicable to cannabis could cause significant financial damage to us. Any significant change in the federal government’s enforcement policy with respect to current federal laws applicable to cannabis could cause significant financial damage to us. We may be irreparably harmed by a change in enforcement policies of the federal government depending on the nature of such change. As of the date of this Report, we have provided products and services to state-approved cannabis cultivators and dispensary facilities. As a result, strict enforcement of federal prohibitions regarding cannabis could subject the Company to criminal prosecution.

Additionally, financial transactions involving proceeds generated by cannabis-related conduct can form the basis for prosecution under the federal money laundering statutes, unlicensed money transmitter statutes and the Bank Secrecy Act. Prior to the DOJ’s rescission of the “Cole Memo”, supplemental guidance from the DOJ issued under the Obama administration directed federal prosecutors to consider the federal enforcement priorities enumerated in the “Cole Memo” when determining whether to charge institutions or individuals with any of the financial crimes described above based upon cannabis-related activity. It is unclear what impact the recent rescission of the “Cole Memo” will have, but federal prosecutors may increase enforcement activities against institutions or individuals that are conducting financial transactions related to cannabis activities.

Additionally, as we are always assessing potential strategic acquisitions of new businesses, we may in the future also pursue opportunities that include growing and/or distributing medical or recreational cannabis, should we determine that such activities are in the best interest of the Company and our stockholders. Any such pursuit would involve additional risks with respect to the regulation of cannabis, particularly if the federal government determines to strictly enforce all federal laws applicable to cannabis.

Federal prosecutors have significant discretion, and no assurance can be given that the federal prosecutor in each judicial district where we operate our business will not choose to strictly enforce the federal laws governing cannabis production or distribution. Any change in the federal government’s enforcement posture with respect to state-licensed cultivation of medical-use cannabis, including the enforcement postures of individual federal prosecutors in judicial districts where we purchase properties, would result in our inability to execute our business plan, and we would likely suffer significant losses, which would adversely affect the trading price of our securities. Furthermore, following any such change in the federal government’s enforcement position, we could be subject to criminal prosecution, which could lead to imprisonment and/or the imposition of penalties, fines, or forfeiture.

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The potential regulation of cannabis by the US Food and Drug Administration could subject us to additional costs and regulatory requirements.

Should the federal government legalize cannabis, it is possible that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), would seek to regulate it under the Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act of 1938. Additionally, the FDA may issue rules and regulations including good manufacturing practices, related to the growth, cultivation, harvesting and processing of medical cannabis. Clinical trials may be needed to verify efficacy and safety. It is also possible that the FDA would require that facilities where medical-use cannabis is grown register with the FDA and comply with certain federally prescribed regulations. If some or all of these regulations are imposed, the impact they would have on the cannabis industry is unknown, including what costs, requirements and possible prohibitions may be enforced. If we are unable to comply with the regulations or registration as prescribed by the FDA it may have an adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition. If we are unable to 14 Table of Contentscomply with the regulations or registration as prescribed by the FDA it may have an adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition.

Any potential growth in the cannabis industry continues to be subject to new and changing state and local laws and regulations.

Continued development of the cannabis industry is dependent upon continued legislative legalization of cannabis at the state level, and a number of factors could slow or halt progress in this area, even where there is public support for legislative action. Any delay or halt in the passing or implementation of legislation legalizing cannabis use, or its cultivation, sale and distribution, or the re-criminalization or restriction of cannabis at the state level could negatively impact our business. Additionally, changes in applicable state and local laws or regulations, including zoning restrictions, permitting requirements, and fees, could restrict the products and services we offer or impose additional compliance costs on us or our customers and tenants. Violations of applicable laws, or allegations of such violations, could disrupt our business and result in a material adverse effect on our operations. We cannot predict the nature of any future laws, regulations, interpretations, or applications, and it is possible that regulations may be enacted in the future that will have be material adverse effects on our business.

Our business, results of operations and financial condition may be adversely affected by pandemic infectious diseases, particularly COVID-19.

Pandemic infectious diseases, such as COVID-19 and its variants, such as Omicron, may adversely impact our business, consolidated results of operations and financial condition. The global spread of COVID-19 has created significant volatility and uncertainty and economic disruption. The extent to which COVID-19 impacts our business, operations and financial results will depend on numerous evolving factors that we may not be able to accurately predict, including: the duration and scope of the pandemic; governmental, business, and individuals’ actions that have been and continue to be taken in response to the pandemic; the impact of the pandemic on economic activity and actions taken in response; the effect on our customers and customer demand our services, products, and solutions; our ability to sell and provide its services and solutions, including as a result of travel restrictions and people working from home; the ability of our customers to pay for our services and solutions; and any closures of our offices and the offices and facilities of our customers. COVID-19, as well as measures taken by governmental authorities to limit the spread of this virus, may interfere with the ability of our employees, suppliers, and other business providers to carry out their assigned tasks or supply materials or services at ordinary levels of performance relative to the requirements of our business, which may cause us to materially curtail certain of our business operations. We require additional funding and such funding, may not be available to us because of contracting capital markets resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. Any of these events could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and/or stock price. Any of these events could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and/or stock price.

The cannabis industry faces significant opposition, and any negative trends will adversely affect our business operations.

We are substantially dependent on the continued market acceptance, and the proliferation of consumers, of medical and recreational cannabis. We believe that with further legalization, cannabis will become more accepted, resulting in growth in consumer demand. However, we cannot predict the future growth rate or future market potential, and any negative outlook on the cannabis industry may adversely affect our business operations.

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The recreational cannabis industry is highly dependent upon consumer perception regarding the safety, efficacy and quality of the recreational cannabis produced. Cannabis is a controversial topic, and consumer perception of our products may be significantly influenced by scientific research or findings, regulatory investigations, litigation, media attention and other publicity regarding the consumption of recreational cannabis products. There can be no assurance that future scientific research, findings, regulatory proceedings, litigation, media attention or other research findings or publicity will be favorable to the recreational cannabis market or any particular product, or consistent with earlier publicity. Future research reports, findings, regulatory proceedings, litigation, media attention or other publicity that are perceived as less favorable than, or that question, earlier research reports, findings or publicity could have a material adverse effect on the demand for our products and our business, results of operations, financial condition, and cash flows. Dependence upon consumer perceptions means that adverse scientific research reports, findings, regulatory proceedings, litigation, media attention or other publicity, regardless of accuracy or merit, could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. Dependence upon consumer perceptions means that adverse scientific research reports, findings, regulatory proceedings, litigation, media 15 Table of Contentsattention or other publicity, regardless of accuracy or merit, could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. Further, adverse publicity reports or other media attention regarding the safety, efficacy, and quality of recreational cannabis in general, or our products specifically, or associating the consumption of recreational cannabis with illness or other negative effects or events, could have such a material adverse effect. Such adverse publicity reports or other media attention could arise even if the adverse effects associated with such products resulted from consumers’ failure to consume such products appropriately or as directed.

Large, well-funded business sectors may have strong economic reasons to oppose the development of the cannabis industry. For example, medical cannabis may adversely impact the existing market for the current “cannabis pill” sold by mainstream pharmaceutical companies. Should cannabis displace other drugs or products, the medical cannabis industry could face a material threat from the pharmaceutical industry, which is well-funded and possesses a strong and experienced lobby. Any inroads the pharmaceutical, or any other potentially displaced, industry or sector could make in halting or impeding the cannabis industry could have a detrimental impact on our business.

We operate an agricultural business and retail stores and are subject to weather and climate conditions.

Our business involves the growing of recreational cannabis, an agricultural product. Such business will be subject to the risks inherent in the agricultural business, such as insects, plant diseases and similar agricultural risks. Further, to the extent that our products are grown outside, we are subject to weather and climate conditions. Further, to the extent that our products are grown outside, we are subject to weather and climate conditions. Extended cold streaks, rain or snow, or generally cold weather or climate, could materially adversely affect our cannabis plants. Extended cold streaks, rain or snow, or generally cold weather or climate, could materially adversely affect our cannabis plants. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that natural elements will not have a material adverse effect on any future production of our products. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that natural elements will not have a material adverse effect on any future production of our products. Further, weather events can impact the ability of our retail stores to remain open and the ability of retail customers to visit our retail locations.

We operate in a highly competitive industry.

The markets for ancillary businesses in the medical marijuana and recreational marijuana industries are competitive and evolving. There is no material aspect of our business that is protected by patents, copyrights, trademarks, or trade names, and we face strong competition from larger companies that may offer similar products and services to ours. Many of our current and potential competitors have longer operating histories, significantly greater financial, marketing and other resources, and larger client bases than us, and there can be no assurance that we will be able to successfully compete against these or other competitors.

Given the rapid changes affecting the global, national, and regional economies generally and the medical marijuana and recreational marijuana industries, specifically, we may not be able to create and maintain a competitive advantage in the marketplace. Our success will depend on our ability to keep pace with any changes in our markets, particularly, legal, and regulatory changes. Our success will also depend on our ability to respond to, among other things, changes in the economy, market conditions, and competitive pressures. Any failure by us to anticipate or respond adequately to such changes could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

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Unfavorable tax treatment of cannabis businesses

Under Section 280E of the United States Internal Revenue Code of 1986 as amended (“Section 280E”), “no deduction or credit shall be allowed for any amount paid or incurred during the taxable year in carrying on any trade or business if such trade or business (or the activities which comprise such trade or business) consists of trafficking in controlled substances (within the meaning of schedule I and II of the Controlled Substances Act) which is prohibited by Federal law or the law of any state in which such trade or business is conducted.” This provision has been applied by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service to cannabis operations, prohibiting them from deducting expenses directly associated with the sale of cannabis. Although the IRS issued a clarification allowing the deduction of certain expenses that can be categorized as cost of sales, the scope of such items is interpreted very narrowly and include the cost of seeds, plants, and labor related to cultivation, while the bulk of operating costs and general administrative costs are not permitted to be deducted. Section 280E therefore has a significant impact on the retail side of cannabis, but a lesser impact on cultivation, processing, production, and packaging operations. A result of Section 280E is that an otherwise profitable business may, in fact, operate at a loss, after taking into account its U.S. income tax expenses.

We may be limited in our ability to utilize, or may not be able to utilize, net operating loss carryforwards to reduce our future tax liability.

We have federal and state net operating loss carryforwards that may be limited or expire unused. Any such limitation or expiration could materially affect our ability to offset future tax liabilities with net operating losses. Any such limitation or expiration could materially affect our ability to offset future tax liabilities with net operating losses.

We may be unable to obtain capital to execute our business plan.

To execute on our business plan, we will need additional capital. However, there can be no assurance that we will be able to obtain financing on agreeable terms, if at all, and any future sale of our equity securities will dilute the ownership of our existing stockholders and could be at prices substantially below the price of the shares of Common Stock sold in the past. If we are unable to obtain the necessary capital, we may need to delay the implementation of or curtail our business plan.

We face risks associated with strategic acquisitions and our business strategy.

As an important part of our roll-up business strategy, we strategically acquire businesses and real property, some of which may be material. These acquisitions involve a number of financial, accounting, managerial, operational, legal, compliance and other risks and challenges, including the following, any of which could adversely affect our results of operations:

The applicable restrictions on the cannabis industry and its participants limit the number of available suitable businesses and real properties that we can acquire;

Any acquired business or real property could under-perform relative to our expectations and the price that we paid for it, or not perform in accordance with our anticipated timetable;

We may incur or assume significant debt in connection with our acquisitions;

Acquisitions could cause our results of operations to differ from our own or the investment community’s expectations in any given period, or over the long term; and

Acquisitions could create demands on our management that we may be unable to effectively address, or for which we may incur additional costs.

Additionally, following any business acquisition, we could experience difficulty in integrating personnel, operations, financial and other systems, and in retaining key employees and customers.

We may record goodwill and other intangible assets on our consolidated balance sheet in connection with our acquisitions. If we are not able to realize the value of these assets, we may be required to incur charges relating to the impairment of these assets, which could materially impact our results of operations.

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Our ability to grow our business depends on state laws pertaining to the cannabis industry.

Continued development of the cannabis industry depends upon continued legislative authorization of cannabis at the state level. The status quo of, or progress in, the cannabis industry is not assured, and any number of factors could slow or halt further progress in this area. While there may be ample public support for legislative action permitting the manufacture and use of cannabis, numerous factors impact the legislative process. For example, many states that voted to legalize medical and/or adult-use cannabis have seen significant delays in the drafting and implementation of industry regulations and issuance of licenses. In addition, burdensome regulation at the state level could slow or stop further development of the medical-use cannabis industry, such as limiting the medical conditions for which medical cannabis can be recommended by physicians for treatment, restricting the form in which medical cannabis can be consumed, imposing significant registration requirements on physicians and patients or imposing significant taxes on the growth, processing and/or retail sales of cannabis, which could have the impact of dampening growth of the cannabis industry and making it difficult for cannabis businesses, including our tenants, to operate profitably in those states. Any one of these factors could slow or halt additional legislative authorization of cannabis, which could harm our results of operations, business, and prospects. Any one of 17 Table of Contentsthese factors could slow or halt additional legislative authorization of cannabis, which could harm our results of operations, business, and prospects.

Applicable state laws may prevent us from maximizing our potential income.

Depending on the laws of each particular state, we may not be able to fully realize our potential to generate profit. For example, some states have residency requirements for those directly involved in the cannabis industry, which may impede our ability to contract with cannabis businesses in those states. Furthermore, cities and counties are being given broad discretion to ban certain cannabis activities. Even if these activities are legal under state law, specific cities and counties may ban them.

Assets used in conjunction with cannabis businesses may be forfeited to the federal government.

Any assets used in conjunction with the violation of federal law are potentially subject to federal forfeiture, even in states where cannabis is legal. In July 2017, the U.S. Department of Justice issued a new policy directive regarding asset forfeiture, referred to as the “equitable sharing program.” Under this new policy directive, federal authorities may adopt state and local forfeiture cases and prosecute them at the federal level, allowing for state and local agencies to keep up to 80% of any forfeiture revenue. This policy directive represents a reversal of the U.S. Department of Justice’s policy under the Obama administration and allows for forfeitures to proceed that are not in accord with the limitations imposed by state-specific forfeiture laws. This new policy directive may lead to increased use of asset forfeitures by local, state, and federal enforcement agencies. If the federal government decides to initiate forfeiture proceedings against cannabis businesses, our investment in those businesses may be lost.

Our operating locations could be targets for theft and our physical security measures may not prevent all security breaches

Our operating locations could be targets for theft. While we have implemented security measures at our operating locations and we continue to monitor and improve security measures, our cultivation and processing facilities could be subject to break-ins, robberies, and other breaches in security. If there is a breach in security and we fall victim to a robbery or theft, the loss of cannabis plants, cannabis oils, cannabis flowers and cultivation and processing equipment could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

To the extent that our business involves the movement and transfer of cash which is collected from locations and deposited into financial institutions, there is a risk of theft or robbery during the transport of cash. We may engage a security firm to provide security in the transport and movement of large amounts of cash. While we have taken steps to prevent theft or robbery of cash during transport, there can be no assurance that there will not be a security breach during the transport and the movement of cash involving the theft of product or cash.

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Our future success depends on our ability to grow and expand our customer base and operational territory.

Our success and the planned growth and expansion of our business depend on our products and services achieving greater and broader acceptance, resulting in a larger customer base, and on the expansion of our operations into new markets. However, there can be no assurance that customers will purchase our products and/or services, or that we will be able to continually expand our customer base. Additionally, if we are unable to effectively market or expand our product and/or service offerings, we will be unable to grow and expand our business or implement our business strategy.

Operating in new markets may expose us to new operational, regulatory, or legal risks and subject us to increased compliance costs. We may need to modify our existing business model and cost structure to comply with local regulatory or other requirements. Facilities we open in new markets may take longer to reach expected revenue and profit levels on a consistent basis, may have higher construction, occupancy, or operating costs, and may present different competitive conditions, consumer preferences and spending patterns than we anticipate. Any of the above could materially impair our ability to increase sales and revenue. Any of the above could materially impair our ability to increase sales and revenue.

We and our existing and potential customers, clients, and tenants have difficulty accessing the service of banks, which may make it difficult for them to operate.

Financial transactions involving proceeds generated by cannabis-related conduct can form the basis for prosecution under the federal money laundering statutes, unlicensed money transmitter statute and the Bank Secrecy Act. Previous guidance issued by the FinCen, a division of the U.S. Department of the Treasury, clarifies how financial institutions can provide services to cannabis-related businesses consistent with their obligations under the Bank Secrecy Act. Prior to the DOJ’s announcement in January 2018 of the rescission of the Cole Memo and related memoranda, supplemental guidance from the DOJ directed federal prosecutors to consider the federal enforcement priorities enumerated in the Cole Memo when determining whether to charge institutions or individuals with any of the financial crimes described above based upon cannabis-related activity. It is unclear what impact the recent rescission of the “Cole Memo” will have, but federal prosecutors may increase enforcement activities against institutions or individuals that are conducting financial transactions related to cannabis activities. The increased uncertainty surrounding financial transactions related to cannabis activities may also result in financial institutions discontinuing services to the cannabis industry.

Because the use, sale, and distribution of cannabis remains illegal under federal law, many banks will not accept deposits from or provide other bank services to businesses involved with cannabis. Consequently, those businesses involved in the cannabis industry continue to encounter difficulty establishing banking relationships, which may increase over time. Our inability to maintain our current bank accounts would make it difficult for us to operate our business, increase our operating costs, and pose additional operational, logistical and security challenges and could result in our inability to implement our business plan. Furthermore, the inability to open bank accounts may make it difficult for our existing and potential customers, clients, and tenants to operate and may make it difficult for them to contract with us. Furthermore, the inability to open bank accounts may make it difficult for our existing and potential customers, clients, and tenants to operate and may make it difficult for them to contract with us.

Conditions in the economy, the markets we serve, and the financial markets generally may adversely affect our business and results of operations.

Our business is sensitive to general economic conditions. We believe that the state of global economic conditions is particularly uncertain due to recent and expected shifts in political, legislative, and regulatory conditions concerning, among other matters, international trade and taxation, and the impact of recent or future natural disasters and/or health and safety epidemics, including the outbreak of COVID-19. An uneven recovery or a renewed global downturn may put pressure on our sales due to reductions in customer demand as well as customers deferring purchases. Slower economic growth, volatility in the credit markets, high levels of unemployment, and other challenges that affect the economy adversely could affect us and our customers and suppliers. Slower economic growth, volatility in the credit markets, high levels of unemployment, and other challenges that affect the economy adversely could affect us and our customers and suppliers. If growth in the economy or in any of the markets we serve slows for a significant period, if there is a significant deterioration in the economy or such markets or if improvements in the economy do not benefit the markets we serve, our business and results of operations could be adversely affected.

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We depend on our management, certain key personnel, and board of directors, as well as our ability to attract, retain and motivate qualified personnel.

Our future success depends largely upon the experience, skill, and contacts of our key personnel, officers and directors, and the loss of the services of these key personnel, officers, or directors, particularly our chief executive officer and chairman of our board of directors, may have a material adverse effect upon our business. Additionally, our revenues are largely driven by several employees with particular expertise in cannabis retail and operations. If one of these key employees were to leave, it would negatively impact our short and long-term results from operations. Shortages in qualified personnel could also limit our ability to successfully implement our growth plan. As we grow, we will need to attract and retain highly skilled experts in the cannabis industry, as well as managerial, sales and marketing, and finance personnel. There can be no assurance, however, that we will be able to attract and retain such personnel.

Our reputation and ability to do business may be negatively impacted by the improper conduct by our business partners, employees, or agents.

We depend on third party suppliers to produce and timely ship our orders. Products purchased from our suppliers are resold to our customers. These suppliers could fail to produce products to our specifications or quality standards and may not deliver units on a timely basis. Any changes in our suppliers to resolve production issues could disrupt our ability to fulfill orders. Any changes in our suppliers to resolve production issues could disrupt our ability to 19 Table of Contentsfulfill orders. Any changes in our suppliers to resolve production issues could also disrupt our business due to delays in finding new suppliers.

Furthermore, we cannot provide assurance that our internal controls and compliance systems will always protect us from acts committed by our employees, agents, or business partners in violation of U.S. federal or state laws. Any improper acts or allegations could damage our reputation and subject us to civil or criminal investigations and related shareholder lawsuits, could lead to substantial civil and criminal monetary and non-monetary penalties, and could cause us to incur significant legal and investigatory fees.

Due to our involvement in the cannabis industry, we may have difficulty obtaining various insurance policies that are desired to operate our business, which may expose us to additional risks and financial liabilities.

Insurance that is otherwise readily available, such as workers’ compensation, general liability, and directors’ and officers’ insurance, is more difficult for us to find and more expensive, because of our involvement in the cannabis industry. There are no guarantees that we will be able to find such insurance in the future, or that the cost will be affordable to us. If we are forced to go without such insurance, it may prevent us from entering certain business sectors, may inhibit our growth, and may expose us to additional risk and financial liabilities. Moreover, insurance against risks such as environmental pollution or other hazards encountered in our operations is not generally available on acceptable terms. We might also become subject to liability for pollution or other hazards which may not be insured against or which we may elect not to insure against because of premium costs or other reasons. Losses from these events may cause us to incur significant costs that could have a material adverse effect upon its financial performance and results of operations.

We may be subject to product liability claims

We face an inherent risk of exposure to product liability claims, regulatory action, and litigation if its products are alleged to have caused significant loss or injury. In addition, the sale of our products would involve the risk of injury to consumers due to tampering by unauthorized third parties or product contamination. Previously unknown adverse reactions resulting from human consumption of marijuana alone or in combination with other medications or substances could occur. We may be subject to various product liability claims, including, among others, that our products caused injury or illness or death, include inadequate instructions for use or include inadequate warnings concerning possible side effects or interactions with other substances. We may be subject to various product liability claims, including, among others, that our products caused injury or illness or death, include inadequate instructions for use or include inadequate warnings concerning possible side effects or interactions with other substances. A product liability claim or regulatory action against us could result in increased costs, could adversely affect our reputation with its clients and consumers generally, and could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. There can be no assurances that we will be able to obtain or maintain product liability insurance on acceptable terms or with adequate coverage against potential liabilities. Such insurance is expensive and may not be available in the future on acceptable terms, or at all. The inability to obtain sufficient insurance coverage on reasonable terms or to otherwise protect against potential product liability claims could prevent or inhibit the commercialization of our current or potential products.

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A cybersecurity incident and other technology disruptions could result in a violation of law or negatively impact our reputation and relationships, our business operations, and our financial condition.

Information and security risks have generally increased in recent years due to the rise in new technologies and the increased sophistication and activities of perpetrators of cyber-attacks. We use computers in substantially all aspects of our business operations, and we also use mobile devices and other online activities to connect with our employees, customers, tenants, suppliers, and other parties. Such uses give rise to cybersecurity risks, including the risk of security breaches, espionage, system disruption, theft, and inadvertent release of information. Our business involves the storage and transmission of numerous classes of sensitive and/or confidential information and intellectual property, including employees’, customers’, tenants’ and suppliers’ personally identifiable information and financial and strategic information about us.

If we fail to adequately assess and identify cybersecurity risks associated with our business operations, we may become increasingly vulnerable to such risks. Even the most well protected information, networks, systems, and facilities remain potentially vulnerable because the techniques used in such attempted security breaches evolve and generally are not recognized until launched against a target, and in some cases are designed not to be detected and, in fact, may not be detected. Even the most well protected information, networks, systems, and facilities remain potentially vulnerable because the techniques used in such attempted security breaches evolve and generally are not 20 Table of Contentsrecognized until launched against a target, and in some cases are designed not to be detected and, in fact, may not be detected. Accordingly, we, our customers and our suppliers may be unable to anticipate these techniques or to implement adequate security barriers or other preventative measures, and thus it is impossible for us, our customers, and our suppliers to entirely mitigate this risk. Further, in the future we may be required to expend additional resources to continue to enhance information security measures and/or to investigate and remediate any information security vulnerabilities. We can provide no assurances that the measures we have implemented to prevent security breaches and cyber incidents will be effective in the event of a cyber-attack.

The theft, destruction, loss, misappropriation or release of sensitive and/or confidential information or intellectual property, or interference with our information technology systems or the technology systems of third-parties on which we rely, could result in business disruption, negative publicity, violation of privacy laws, loss of tenants, loss of customers, potential liability and competitive disadvantage, any of which could result in a material adverse effect on financial condition or results of operations.

We may be required to recognize impairment charges that could materially affect our results of operations.

We assess our intangible assets, and our other long-lived assets as and when required by GAAP to determine whether they are impaired. If they are impaired, we would record appropriate impairment charges. It is possible that we may be required to record significant impairment charges in the future and, if we do so, our results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

Changes in accounting standards could affect our reported financial results.

Our management uses significant judgment, estimates, and assumptions in applying GAAP. New accounting standards that may be applicable to our financial statements, or changes in the interpretation of existing standards, could have a significant effect on our reported results of operations for the affected periods.

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Risks Related to the Securities Markets and Ownership of Our Common Stock

The price of our Common Stock is volatile and the value of your investment could decline.

The market price of our Common Stock has been, and may in the future, be volatile. Between January 1, 2015, and December 31, 2023, the closing price of our Common Stock has ranged from a low of $ 0.05 per share to a high of $10.35 per share. Between January 1, 2015, and December 31, 2021, the closing price of our stock has ranged from a low of $0.22 per share to a high of $10.35 per share. Accordingly, it is difficult to forecast the future performance of our Common Stock. The market price of our Common Stock may be higher or lower than the price you pay, depending on many factors, some of which are beyond our control and may not be related to our operating performance. The market price of our common stock may be higher or lower than the price you pay, depending on many factors, some of which are beyond our control and may not be related to our operating performance. These fluctuations could cause you to lose all or part of your investment in our Common Stock. Factors that could cause fluctuations in the trading price of our Common Stock include the following:

regulatory developments at the federal, state or local level;

announcements of new products, services, relationships with strategic partners, acquisitions, or other events by us or our competitors;

changes in general economic conditions;

price and volume fluctuations in the overall stock market from time to time;

significant volatility in the market price and trading volume of similar companies in our industry;

fluctuations in the trading volume of our shares or the size of our public float;

actual or anticipated changes in our operating results or fluctuations in our operating results;

major catastrophic events;

sales of large blocks of our stock; or

changes in senior management or key personnel.

In addition, if the market for cannabis company stocks or the stock market in general experiences loss of investor confidence, the trading price of our Common Stock could decline for reasons unrelated to our business, operating results, or financial condition. The trading price of our Common Stock might decline in reaction to events that affect other companies in our industry, even if these events do not directly affect us. The trading price of our common stock might decline in reaction to events that affect other companies in our industry, even if these events do not directly affect us. In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, securities class action litigation has often been brought against that company. If our stock price continues to be volatile, we may become the target of securities litigation, which could result in substantial costs and divert our management’s attention and resources from our business. This could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition.

Trading and listing of securities of cannabis related businesses, including our Common Stock, may be subject to restrictions.

In the United States, many clearing houses for major broker-dealer firms, including Pershing LLC, the largest clearing, custody, and settlement firm in the United States, have refused to handle securities or settle transactions of companies engaged in cannabis related business. This means that certain broker-dealers cannot accept for deposit or settle transactions in the securities of cannabis related businesses. Further, national securities exchanges in the United States, including Nasdaq and the New York Stock Exchange, have historically refused to list cannabis related businesses, including cannabis retailers, that operate primarily in the United States; there is no indication that this proscription will change any time soon. Accordingly, we continue to be listed on the OTCQB, which as an over-the-counter market, is subject to greater volatility and less stability than would be the case on a national securities exchange. Our existing operations, and any future operations or investments, may become the subject of heightened scrutiny by clearing houses and stock exchanges, in addition to regulators and other authorities in the United States. Our existing operations, and any future operations or investments, may become the subject of heightened scrutiny by clearing houses and stock exchanges, in addition to regulators and other authorities in the United States. Any existing or future restriction