Quiver Quantitative

Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - AZEK

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Item 1A. Risk Factors.

Investing in our Class A common stock involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the following risks and uncertainties, together with all of the other information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, or this Annual Report, including our Consolidated Financial Statements and related notes included elsewhere in this Annual Report, before making an investment decision. In addition to the risks relating to the COVID-19 pandemic that are specifically described in these Risk Factors, the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic may also have the effect of significantly heightening many of the other risks associated with our business, including the other risks described in this Annual Report. In addition to the risks relating to the COVID-19 pandemic that are specifically described in these Risk Factors, the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic may also have the effect of significantly heightening many of the other risks associated with our business and an investment in our Class A common stock, including the other risks described in this Annual 17 Table of Contents Report. The occurrence of any of the following risks, or additional risks not presently known to us or that we currently believe to be immaterial, could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. In such case, the trading price of our Class A common stock could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment.

Summary Risk Factors

The risks described below include, but are not limited to, the following:

the fact that the COVID-19 public health pandemic is adversely affecting, and is expected to continue to adversely affect, certain aspects of our business;

demand for our products is significantly influenced by general economic conditions and trends in consumer spending on outdoor living and home exteriors, and adverse trends in, among other things, the health of the economy, repair and remodel and new construction activity, industrial production and institutional funding constraints;

risks related to shortages in supply, price increases or deviations in the quality of raw materials;

we compete against other manufacturers of (i) engineered and composite products; and (ii) products made from wood, metal and other traditional materials;

the seasonal nature of certain of our products and the impact that changes in weather conditions and product mix may have on our sales;

our ability to develop new and improved products and effectively manage the introduction of new products;

our ability to effectively manage changes in our manufacturing process resulting from the growth and expansion of our business and operations, including with respect to new manufacturing facilities, cost savings and integration initiatives and the introduction of new products;

risks related to our ability to accurately predict demand for our products and risks related to our ability to maintain our relationships with key distributors or other customers;

our ability to retain management;

risks related to acquisitions or joint ventures we may pursue;

our ability to maintain product quality and product performance at an acceptable cost, and potential exposures resulting from our product warranties;

our ability to ensure that our products comply with local building codes and ordinances;

our ability to maintain an effective system of internal controls and produce timely and accurate financial statements or comply with applicable regulations;

our ability to protect our intellectual property rights;

risk of disruption or failure of our information technology systems or failure to successfully implement new technology effectively;

cybersecurity risks and risks arising from new regulations governing information security and privacy;

risks associated with our indebtedness and debt service.

our reliance on dividends, distributions and other payments from our subsidiaries to meet our obligations;

the continuing influence on our company, including the right to designate individuals to be included in the slate of nominees for election to our board of directors, by our Sponsors, whose interests may conflict with our interests and those of other stockholders; and

certain provisions in our certificate of incorporation and our bylaws that may delay or prevent a change of control.

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Risks Relating to Our Business and Industry

The COVID-19 public health pandemic is adversely affecting, and is expected to continue to adversely affect, certain aspects of our business.

The COVID-19 pandemic has negatively impacted the global economy, disrupted consumer spending and global supply chains, and created significant volatility in and disruption of financial markets. These issues have impacted, and we expect they will continue to impact, our operations, and the nature, extent and duration of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic or any future disease or adverse health condition is highly uncertain and beyond our control.

The impacts of the pandemic on our business include the following, without limitation:

We have been and will likely continue to be impacted by global supply chain disruptions caused directly or indirectly by the COVID-19 pandemic; such supply chain disruptions have resulted in and will likely continue to result in delays in shipments of our products to our customers as well as of our raw materials and have resulted in increases in our raw material and freight costs.

We may experience disruptions to our business if we experience an outbreak of COVID-19 in one or more of our facilities, the impact of which may be exacerbated by vaccination rates at certain of our facilities; if an outbreak were particularly widespread, our operations could be disrupted to varying degrees, up to and including a shutdown of the impacted facility.

We may experience reductions in demand for our products if consumers spend less time at and money on their homes as the pandemic subsides, we may also experience reductions in demand for our products to the extent the pandemic continues to have a negative impact on the economy in general, and our and third- parties' estimates of future market growth may prove inaccurate.

We may be exposed to increased cybersecurity risks as a result of increases in the number of employees we have working remotely.

We also face the possibility of increased overhead or other expenses, including difficulties associated with hiring additional employees or replacing employees, resulting from compliance with any future government orders or other measures enacted in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including the proposed federal requirement that employers with more than one hundred employees mandate vaccinations or regular COVID-19 testing among their employee base.

Our management of the impact of COVID-19 has required, and will likely continue to require, a significant investment of time by our management and employees as well as other resources and could cause us to divert or delay the application of our resources toward new initiatives, including the development of new products, which could adversely impact our financial condition and results of operations in future periods. Our ability to maintain operations at or near the levels of operations experienced before the COVID-19 pandemic depends on numerous factors beyond our control, including, among other things: (1) the duration of, any revisions in, and the possible reimposition of governmental quarantine, shelter-in-place or similar social distancing orders or guidelines; (2) the occurrence and magnitude of future outbreaks in the population generally or where our manufacturing facilities are located, including as a result of the emergence of new COVID-19 variants; (3) the vaccination rates of our employees or the availability of other medical remedies and preventive measures; and (4) broader economic conditions, including unemployment levels and the reaction of consumers to potentially longer-term economic uncertainty, which may adversely impact our financial condition and results of operations in future periods. The timing for us resuming operations at or near the levels of operations experienced before the COVID-19 pandemic depends on numerous factors beyond our control, including, among other things: (1) the 20 Table of Contents duration of, any revisions in, and the possible reimposition of governmental quarantine, shelter-in-place or similar social distancing orders or guidelines; (2) the occurrence and magnitude of future outbreaks, including localized outbreaks where our manufacturing facilities are located; (3) the availability of vaccines or other medical remedies and preventive measures; and (4) broader economic conditions, including unemployment levels and the reaction of consumers to potentially longer-term economic uncertainty, which may adversely impact our financial condition and results of operations in future periods.

Although we have implemented measures to mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on us, these measures may not be fully successful. In addition, while governmental and other measures have been relaxed in the United States since the onset of the pandemic, we cannot predict the degree to, or the period over, which we will be affected by the pandemic and such measures, including any impact of such measures being reimposed, whether as a result of increased prevalence of COVID-19 variants or otherwise.

Demand for our products is significantly influenced by general economic conditions and trends in consumer spending on outdoor living and home exteriors, and adverse trends in, among other things, the health of the economy, repair and remodel and new construction activity, industrial production, consumer confidence and discretionary spending and institutional funding constraints could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Demand for our products is significantly influenced by a number of economic factors affecting our customers, including distributors, dealers, contractors, architects, builders, homeowners and institutional and commercial consumers. Demand for our products depends on the level of residential and commercial improvement and renovation and new construction activity, and, in particular, the amount of spending on outdoor living spaces and home exteriors. Home and commercial renovation and improvement and new construction activity are affected by, among other things, interest rates, consumer confidence and spending habits,

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demographic trends, housing affordability levels, unemployment rates, institutional funding constraints, industrial production levels, tariffs, actual inflation levels and uncertainty with respect to future inflation levels and general economic conditions.

For example, in our Residential segment, sales of our products depend primarily on the level of repair and remodel activity and, to a lesser extent, new construction activity. Accordingly, increases in interest rates or the reduced availability of financing can reduce the level of home improvement and new construction activity and the demand for our products. In addition, the residential repair and remodel market depends in part on home equity financing, and accordingly, the level of equity in homes will affect consumers' ability to obtain a home equity line of credit and engage in renovations that would result in purchases of our products. Accordingly, a weakness in home prices may result in a decreased demand for our residential products. Further, interest rates remain at historically low levels. We cannot be sure that interest rates will continue to remain favorable for prospective and current homeowners or, even if interest rates remain favorable, that such homeowners will continue to purchase or remodel their homes at current or historical levels.

Many of our residential products are impacted by consumer demand for, and spending on, outdoor living spaces and home exteriors. For example, sales of our decking and railing products depend on lifestyle and architectural trends and the extent to which consumers prioritize spending to enhance outdoor living spaces for their homes. While we believe consumer preferences have increased spending on outdoor living and home exteriors in recent years, the level of spending could decrease in the future. Decreased spending on outdoor living spaces and home exteriors generally or as a percentage of home improvement activity may decrease demand for our decking, railing and trim products.

Demand for our products in our Commercial segment is affected by the level of commercial and governmental construction and renovation activity. The levels of commercial and governmental construction and renovation activity are affected by the levels of interest rates, availability of financing for commercial and industrial projects, the general business environment and the availability of governmental funding. Sales of products by our Commercial segment include sales for use in institutions, such as universities and schools, and in federal, state and local government buildings, which depend on federal, state and local funding for construction and renovation projects. Sales to institutions that depend on public funding are affected by factors that may impose constraints on funding availability for construction and renovation projects, including increased operational costs, budget cuts by federal, state and local governments, including as a result of lower than anticipated tax revenues, increased limitations on federal spending or government shutdowns. Sales to commercial establishments depend on, among other things, general levels of industrial production and business growth and the performance of the various markets in which our commercial end customers operate.

Adverse trends in any of the foregoing factors could reduce our sales and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Such factors could also alter the balance of our Residential and Commercial sales or the balance of our product sales within either such segment. In light of differing margins, changes in the relative amount and type of residential and commercial industrial activity or the mix of products sold may have an impact on our business and cause our revenues and profitability to fluctuate from period to period.

Shortages and disruptions in supply, price increases or deviations in the quality of the raw materials used to manufacture our products could adversely affect our sales and operating results.

The primary raw materials used in our products are various petrochemical resins, including polyethylene, polypropylene and PVC resins, reclaimed polyethylene and PVC material, waste wood fiber and aluminum. We also utilize other additives including modifiers, TiO2, and pigments. Our contracts with key suppliers are typically short term in nature, with terms generally ranging from one to three years. While we do not rely on any single supplier for the majority of our raw materials, we do obtain certain raw materials from single or a limited number of suppliers. In particular, we rely on a single supplier for certain critical capped compounds used in our decking and railing products. We do not currently have arrangements in place for a redundant or second-source supply for those compounds. In addition, we have experienced disruptions and delays in our supply chain in fiscal year 2021 and may continue to experience similar or exacerbated disruptions or delays in the future. Such disruptions and delays have caused us to seek alternate suppliers for certain raw materials, and we may need to do so again in the future. Alternate suppliers may be more expensive, may encounter delays in shipments to us or may be unavailable, which would adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In the event of an industry-wide general shortage of our raw materials, a shortage affecting or discontinuation in providing any such raw materials by one or more of our suppliers or a supplier's declaration of force majeure, we may not be able to arrange for alternative sources of such materials on a timely basis or on equally favorable terms. In recent years, we have increased the use of reclaimed polyethylene and PVC material in our products and we have also increased our production across our facilities. As we increase our use of such materials and introduce new materials into our manufacturing processes, we may be unable to obtain adequate quantities of such new raw materials in a timely manner. Any such shortage may materially adversely affect our production process as well as our competitive position as compared to companies that are able to source their raw materials more reliably or at lower cost.

In addition, increases in the market prices of raw materials used in the manufacture of our products could adversely affect our operating results. The cost of some of the raw materials we use in the manufacture of our products is subject to significant price volatility and other drivers often outside of our control. The cost of some of the raw materials we use in the manufacture of our products is subject to significant price volatility. For example, the cost of petrochemical resins used in our manufacturing processes has historically varied significantly and has been affected by changes in supply and demand and in the price of crude oil. In

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addition, during the quarter ended March 31, 2021, prices for certain of our raw material costs, including costs for resin polyethylene and PVC material, were negatively impacted by supply chain and weather-related disruptions, including as a result of Winter Storm Uri and other weather events, resulting in increased costs and disruption in supply. To the extent extreme weather events and weather-related disruptions occur in the future, particularly in the southern part of the United States where a significant portion of our raw materials are produced, we may continue to face increased and/or unpredictable costs for our raw materials. Further, in connection with the COVID-19 pandemic and vaccination or implementation of mandatory testing efforts, we could also see pressure on the price of certain of our raw material costs to the extent the government allocates certain products pursuant to the U.S. Defense Production Act in a way that affects our suppliers and impacts their ability to fulfill our orders for those raw materials, in which event such fulfillment could be delayed or the price for such products may increase. We have not entered into hedges of our raw material costs, and our supply contracts with our major vendors do not contain obligations to sell raw materials to us at a fixed price.

We seek to mitigate the effects of increases in raw material costs by broadening our supplier base, increasing our use of recycled material and scrap, reducing waste and exploring options for material substitution and by increasing prices, however, we may not be able to recover the increases through corresponding increases in the prices of our products or the other mitigating actions noted above. Even if we are able to implement mitigating actions and/or increase prices over time, we may not be able to take such action or increase prices as rapidly as our costs increase. If we are unable to, or experience a delay in our ability to, recover such increases in our costs, our gross profit will suffer. In addition, increases in the price of our products to compensate for increased costs of raw materials may reduce demand for our products and adversely affect our competitive position as compared to products made of other materials, such as wood and metal, that are not affected by changes in the price of resins and some of the other raw materials that we use in the manufacture of our products.

We are dependent upon the ability of our suppliers to consistently provide raw materials that meet our specifications, quality standards and other applicable criteria. Our suppliers' failure to provide raw materials that meet such criteria could adversely affect production schedules and our product quality, which in turn could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We operate in a competitive business environment. If we are unable to compete effectively, our sales would suffer and our business, financial condition and operating results would be adversely affected.

We operate in a competitive business environment, and we compete with multiple companies with respect to each of our products. While we have longstanding business relationships with many of our distributors, dealers and contractors, we generally do not have long-term contracts with these customers. Accordingly, any failure to compete effectively, including as a result of the various factors described below, could cause our customers to cease purchasing our products or rapidly decrease our sales.

Our residential products compete primarily with wood products that comprise the majority of decking, railing, trim and related market sales. We also compete with metal products and with engineered products sold by other companies. In our Commercial segment, we compete in several highly fragmented markets. Our Vycom products compete with products sold into narrow market segments with a wide range of end uses through specialized distribution networks that vary depending on the particular end use. Products made by Scranton Products compete with bathroom partitions, lockers and storage solutions sold at a wide range of prices and manufactured using a variety of materials.

Our business model relies on the continued conversion in demand from traditional wood products to our engineered products, and our business could suffer if this conversion does not continue in the future. A number of suppliers of wood and wood composite decking, railing and trim products have established relationships with contractors, builders and large home improvement retailers, and, to compete successfully, we must expand and strengthen our relationships with those parties. We must also compete successfully with products from other manufacturers that offer alternatives to wood and wood composite products, including by developing competitive new products and by responding successfully to new products introduced, and pricing and other competitive actions taken, by competitors. During fiscal year 2021, we increased prices across certain products within our Residential segment. While we believe that we did not experience a decrease in demand as a result of these price increases, we cannot be sure that they will not reduce demand in the future or that any further price increases will not reduce demand. See “—Shortages in supply, price increases or deviations in the quality of the raw materials used to manufacture our products could adversely affect our sales and operating results. Shortages in supply, price increases or deviations in the quality of the raw materials used to manufacture our products could adversely affect our sales and operating results.

Some of our competitors have financial, production, marketing and other resources that are significantly greater than ours. Consolidation by industry participants could further increase their resources and result in competitors with expanded market share, larger customer bases, greater diversified product offerings and greater technological and marketing expertise, which may allow them to compete more effectively against us. Moreover, our competitors may develop products that are superior to our products (on a price-to-value basis or otherwise) or may adapt more quickly to new technologies or evolving customer requirements. Technological advances by our competitors may lead to new manufacturing techniques and make it more difficult for us to compete.

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Our quarterly operating results may fluctuate as a result of seasonality, changes in weather conditions and changes in product mix.

We have typically experienced moderately higher levels of sales of our residential products in the second fiscal quarter of the year as a result of our “early buy” sales and extended payment terms typically available during that quarter. As a result of these extended payment terms, our accounts receivable have typically reached seasonal peaks at the end of the second fiscal quarter of the year, and our net cash provided by operating activities has typically been lower in that quarter relative to other quarters. Our sales are also generally impacted by the number of days in a quarter or a year that contractors and other professionals are able to install our products. We have generally experienced lower levels of sales of residential products during the first fiscal quarter due to adverse weather conditions in certain markets, which typically reduce the construction and renovation activity during the winter season. Although our products can be installed year-round, unusually adverse weather conditions can negatively impact the timing of the sales of certain of our products, causing reduced sales and negatively impacting profitability when such conditions exist. Our residential products are generally purchased shortly before installation and used in outdoor environments. As a result, there is a correlation between the number of products we sell and weather conditions during the time they are to be installed. As a result, there is a correlation between the amount of products we sell and weather conditions during the time they are to be installed. Adverse weather conditions, including the increased occurrence or strength of extreme weather events caused by climate change or otherwise, may interfere with ordinary construction, delay projects or lead to cessation of construction involving our products. Prolonged adverse weather conditions could significantly reduce our sales in one or more periods. These conditions may shift sales to subsequent reporting periods or decrease overall sales, given the limited outdoor construction season in many locations. In addition, we have experienced higher levels of sales of our engineered bathroom partition products and our locker products during the second half of our fiscal year, which includes the summer months during which schools are typically closed and therefore more likely to be undergoing remodel activities. These factors can cause our operating results to fluctuate on a quarterly basis.

Our operating results may also fluctuate due to changes in the mix of products sold. We sell products at different prices, composed of different materials and involving varying levels of manufacturing complexity. Changes in the mix of products sold from period to period may affect our average selling price, cost of sales and gross margins.

If we fail to develop new and improved products successfully, or if we fail to effectively manage the introduction of new products, our business will suffer.

Our continued success depends on our ability to predict the products that will be demanded by our customers and consumers, such as homeowners or commercial or industrial purchasers, and to continue to innovate and introduce improved products in our existing product lines and products in new product categories. We may not be successful in anticipating these needs or preferences or in developing new and improved products. If we do not respond effectively to changing market trends, demands and preferences and to actions by competitors by introducing competitive new products, our business, financial condition and results of operations would suffer.

Even if we do introduce new products, consumers may not choose our new products over existing products. In addition, competitors could introduce new or improved products that would replace or reduce demand for our products or develop proprietary changes in manufacturing technologies that may render our products obsolete or too expensive to compete effectively. In addition, when we introduce new products, we must effectively anticipate and manage the effect of new product introductions on sales of our existing products. If new products displace sales of existing products more broadly or rapidly than anticipated, we may have excess inventory of existing products and be required to reduce prices on existing products, which could adversely affect our results of operations. If new products displace sales of existing products more broadly or rapidly than anticipated, we may have excess inventory of existing products and be required to reduce prices on existing products, which could adversely affect 23 Table of Contents our results of operations. As we continue to introduce new products at varying price points to broaden our product offerings to compete with products made with wood or other traditional materials across a wide range of prices, our overall gross margins may vary from period to period as a result of changes in product mix.

Moreover, we may introduce new products with initially lower gross margins with the expectation that the gross margins associated with those products may improve over time as we improve our manufacturing efficiency for those products, and our results of operations would be adversely affected if we are unable to realize the anticipated improvements.

In the past we have devoted, and in the future we expect to continue to devote, significant resources to developing new products. However, we cannot be sure that we will successfully complete the development and testing of new products and be able to release the products when anticipated or at all. From time to time, we may make investments in the development of products we ultimately determine not to release resulting in write-downs of inventory and related assets.

Our business would suffer if we do not effectively manage changes in our manufacturing processes resulting from the growth and expansion of our business and operations, including with respect to new manufacturing facilities, cost-savings and integration initiatives and the introduction of new technologies and products.

We continually review our manufacturing operations in an effort to achieve increased manufacturing efficiencies, to integrate new technologies and to address changes in our product lines and in market demand. Periodic manufacturing integrations, realignments and cost-savings programs and other changes have adversely affected, and could in the future adversely affect, our

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operating efficiency and results of operations during the periods in which such programs are being implemented. Such programs may include the addition of manufacturing lines and the consolidation, integration and upgrading of facilities, functions, systems and procedures, including the introduction of new manufacturing technologies and product innovations. These programs involve substantial planning, often require capital investments, and may result in charges for fixed asset impairments or obsolescence and substantial severance costs. Our ability to achieve cost savings or other benefits within the time frames we anticipate is subject to many estimates and assumptions, a number of which are subject to significant economic, competitive and other uncertainties. For example, we have made substantial investments to expand our recycling capabilities and to increase the use of reclaimed materials in our manufacturing processes. While we anticipate that enhancing these capabilities will ultimately decrease our costs, the introduction of these capabilities has required significant initial investment, and we cannot be certain we will realize the benefits of this initiative when anticipated or at all. If these investments and other changes are not effectively integrated into our manufacturing processes, we may suffer from production delays, lower efficiency and manufacturing yields, increased costs and reduced net sales.

We also face risks in starting up new manufacturing facilities, including with respect to expanding our overall production capacity as well as moving production to such new facilities, that could increase costs, divert management attention and reduce our operating results. We are currently in the process of a multi-phase capacity expansion program and, in March 2021, we announced the opening of a new manufacturing facility to be located in Boise, Idaho. The establishment and operation of that new facility, and any capacity expansion project, involves significant risks and challenges, including, but not limited to, design and construction delays and cost overruns. There can be no assurance that our Boise facility and any other expansion project will be operational on the timeline or contribute the incremental production capacity that we anticipate, and we cannot guarantee that any such facility will operate at costs acceptable to us or that demand for our products will remain at levels high enough to meet the return on investment necessary to justify our investment in these projects.

We must also effectively address changes to our manufacturing operations resulting from growth of our business generally and introduction of new products. As we increase our manufacturing capacity to meet market demand or begin to manufacture new products at scale, we may face unanticipated manufacturing challenges as production volumes increase, new processes are implemented and new supplies of raw materials used in these products are secured. New products may initially be more costly and less efficient to produce than our existing products. In addition, we could experience delays in production as we increase our manufacturing capacity or begin to manufacture new products that may result in the products ordered by our customers being on back-order as initial production issues are addressed. As a result, increases in manufacturing capacity or the introduction of new products may initially be associated with lower efficiency and manufacturing yields and increased costs, including shipping costs to fill back-orders. If we experience production delays or inefficiencies, a deterioration in the quality of our products or other complications in managing changes to our manufacturing processes, including those that are designed to increase capacity, enhance efficiencies and reduce costs or that relate to new products or technologies, we may not achieve the benefits that we anticipate from these actions when expected, or at all, and our operations could experience disruptions, our manufacturing efficiency could suffer and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

Our sales and results of operations may suffer if we do not maintain our relationships with, forecast the demand of and make timely deliveries to our key distributors or other customers.

Our operations depend upon our ability to maintain our strong relationships with our network of distributors and dealers. Our top ten distributors collectively accounted for a majority of our net sales for the year ended September 30, 2021. Our largest distributor, Parksite Inc., accounted for approximately 23% of our net sales for the year ended September 30, 2021. While we have long-standing business relationships with many of our key distributors and our distribution contracts generally provide for exclusive relationships with respect to certain products within certain geographies, these contracts typically permit the distributor to terminate for convenience on several months’ notice. The loss of, or a significant adverse change in, our relationships with one or more of our significant distributors could materially reduce our net sales.

Distributors and dealers that sell our products are sensitive to meeting the demands of their end customers on a timely basis. Dealers that sell our products typically place orders with our distributors that need to be filled in a short time frame, and these dealers typically do not have an exclusive relationship with us. Purchases by our distributors and dealers are affected by their individual decisions on the levels of inventory they carry, their views on product demand, their financial condition and the manner in which they choose to manage inventory risk. In addition, purchases by distributors and dealers are affected by a variety of other factors, including product pricing, increases in the number of competitive producers and the production capacity of other producers, new product introductions, changes in levels of home renovation and new construction activity, and weather-related fluctuations in demand. As a result, demand for our products can be difficult to predict. If we do not forecast and plan production effectively to manufacture sufficient products to meet demand or if we experience delays in our ability to manufacture products, dealers may seek alternative products, including those of our competitors. Failure to meet demand requirements on a timely basis may cause distributors or dealers to build up inventory as a precautionary measure, rapidly shift their product mix away from our products, harm our long-term relationships with distributors and dealers, harm our brand and reduce, or increase the variability of, our net sales.

We must continue to provide product offerings at price points that meet the needs of distributors and dealers and that they perceive to be competitive with the products on the market. If our key distributors or dealers are unwilling to continue to sell our

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products at existing or higher levels, or if they desire to sell competing products alongside our products, our ability to maintain or increase our sales could suffer. In addition, mergers or acquisitions involving our distributors or dealers and one of our competitors, or a distributor or dealer with a relationship with one of our competitors, could decrease or eliminate purchases of our product by that distributor or dealer. If a key distributor or dealer were to terminate its relationship with us or reduce purchases of our products, we may not be able to replace that relationship with a relationship with a new distributor or dealer in a timely manner or at all. In addition, any such new relationship may take time to develop and may not be as favorable to us as the relationship it is replacing. The loss of, or a reduction in orders from, any significant distributor or dealer, may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

An interruption of our production capability at one or more of our manufacturing facilities from pandemics, accident, calamity or other causes, or events affecting the global economy, could adversely affect our business.

We manufacture our products at a limited number of manufacturing facilities, and we generally do not have redundant production capabilities that would enable us to shift production of a particular product rapidly to another facility in the event of a loss of one of or a portion of one of our manufacturing facilities. A catastrophic loss of the use of one or more of our manufacturing facilities due to pandemics, including the COVID-19 pandemic, accident, fire, explosion, labor issues, tornado, other weather conditions, natural disasters, condemnation, cancellation or non-renewals of leases, terrorist attacks or other acts of violence or war or otherwise could have a material adverse effect on our production capabilities. In addition, unexpected failures, including as a result of power outages or similar disruptions outside of our control, of our equipment and machinery could result in production delays or the loss of raw materials or products in the equipment or machinery at the time of such failures. Any of these events could result in substantial revenue loss and repair costs. An interruption in our production capabilities could also require us to make substantial capital expenditures to replace damaged or destroyed facilities or equipment. An interruption in our production capabilities could also require us to make substantial capital expenditures 26 Table of Contents to replace damaged or destroyed facilities or equipment. There are a limited number of manufacturers that make some of the equipment we use in our manufacturing facilities, and we could experience significant delay in replacing manufacturing equipment necessary to resume production. An interruption in our production capability, particularly if it is of significant duration, could result in a permanent loss of customers who decide to seek alternate products.

Our business operations could be adversely affected by the loss of the services from members of our senior management team and other key employees.

Our success depends in part on the continued contributions of our senior management and other key employees. Our senior leadership team members have extensive sales and marketing, engineering, product development, manufacturing and finance backgrounds in our industry. This experience also includes specialized knowledge and expertise relating to the manufacturing and production of composite Outdoor Living products and recycled materials, a combination which may be particularly hard to replace considering the limited number of companies that produce such products in general and particularly with the breadth of our product offerings. The loss of any member of our senior management team or other key employees in the future could significantly impede our ability to successfully implement our business strategy, financial plans, product development goals, marketing initiatives and other objectives. Should we lose the services of any member of our senior management team or key personnel, replacing such personnel could involve a prolonged search and divert management time and attention and we may not be able to locate and hire a qualified replacement. We do not carry key person insurance to mitigate the financial effect of losing the services of any member of our management team. We do not carry key man insurance to mitigate the financial effect of losing the services of any member of our management team.

Acquisitions or joint ventures we may pursue in the future may be unsuccessful.

We may consider the acquisition of other manufacturers or product lines of other businesses that either complement or expand our existing business, or may enter into joint ventures. For example, we have acquired a number of companies in our recent history, including with respect to both manufacturing operations and recycling initiatives. While we believe those acquisitions were successful in improving our business, we cannot assure you that we will be able to consummate any other acquisitions or joint ventures or that any future acquisitions or joint ventures will be able to be consummated at acceptable prices and on acceptable terms. Any future acquisitions or joint ventures we pursue may involve a number of risks, including some or all of the following:

difficulty in identifying acceptable acquisition candidates;

the inability to consummate acquisitions or joint ventures on favorable terms and to obtain adequate financing, which financing may not be available to us at times, in amounts or on terms acceptable to us, if at all;

the diversion of management’s attention from our core businesses;

the disruption of our ongoing business;

entry into markets in which we have limited or no experience;

the inability to integrate our acquisitions or enter into joint ventures without substantial costs, delays or other problems;

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unexpected liabilities for which we may not be adequately indemnified;

inability to enforce indemnification and non-compete agreements;

failing to successfully incorporate acquired product lines or brands into our business;

the failure of the acquired business or joint venture to perform as well as anticipated;

the failure to realize expected synergies and cost savings;

the loss of key employees or customers of the acquired business;

increasing demands on our operational systems and the potential inability to implement adequate internal controls covering an acquired business or joint venture;

any requirement that we make divestitures of operations or property in order to comply with applicable antitrust laws;

possible adverse effects on our reported operating results, particularly during the first several reporting periods after the acquisition is completed; and

impairment of goodwill relating to an acquired business, which could reduce reported income.

Any of these risks could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

In addition, acquisitions or joint ventures could result in significant increases in our outstanding indebtedness and debt service requirements or could involve the issuance of preferred stock or common stock that would be dilutive to existing stockholders. Incurring additional debt to fund an acquisition may result in higher debt service and a requirement to comply with financial and other covenants in addition to those contained in our Senior Secured Credit Facilities, including potential restrictions on future acquisitions and distributions. Funding an acquisition with our existing cash would reduce our liquidity. The terms of our existing and future debt agreements may limit the size and/or number of acquisitions we can pursue or our ability to enter into a joint venture.

Our business could be adversely affected if we fail to maintain product quality and product performance at an acceptable cost or if we incur significant losses, increased costs or harm to our reputation or brand as a result of product liability claims or product recalls.

In order to maintain and increase our net sales and sustain profitable operations we must produce high quality products at acceptable manufacturing costs and yields. If we are unable to maintain the quality and performance of our products at acceptable costs, our brand, the market acceptance of our products and our results of operations would suffer. As we regularly modify our product lines and introduce changes to our manufacturing processes or incorporate new raw materials, we may encounter unanticipated issues with product quality or production delays. For example, we have recently introduced products that incorporate larger proportions of reclaimed raw materials, primarily reclaimed polyethylene and PVC, and we expect to further increase the proportions of reclaimed raw materials in our products in the future. For example, we have recently introduced products that incorporate larger proportions of reclaimed raw materials, primarily reclaimed polyethylene and PVC. While we engage in product testing in an effort to identify and address any product quality issues before we introduce products to market, unanticipated product quality or performance issues may be identified after a product has been introduced and sold.

In addition, we face the risk of exposure to product liability or other claims, including class action lawsuits, in the event our products are, or are alleged to be, defective or have resulted in harm to persons or to property. We may in the future incur significant liabilities if product liability lawsuits against us are successful. We may also have to recall and/or replace defective products, which would also result in adverse publicity and loss of sales, and would result in us incurring costs connected with the recall, which could be material. Any losses not covered by insurance could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Real or perceived quality issues, including those arising in connection with product liability lawsuits, warranty claims or recalls, could also result in adverse publicity, which could harm our brand and reputation and cause our sales to decline rapidly. In addition, any such issues may be seized on by competitors in efforts to increase their market share.

We provide product warranties and, if our product warranty obligations were significantly in excess of our reserves, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

We provide various warranties on our products, ranging from five years to lifetime warranties depending on the product and subject to various limitations. Management estimates warranty reserves, based in part upon historical warranty costs, as a proportion of sales by product line. Management also considers various relevant factors, including our stated warranty policies and procedures, as part of the evaluation of our warranty liability. Because warranty issues may surface later in the life cycle of a product, management continues to review these estimates on a regular basis and considers adjustments to these estimates based on actual experience compared to historical estimates. Estimating the required warranty reserves requires a high level of judgment, especially as many of our products are at a relatively early stage in their product life cycles, and we cannot be sure that our warranty reserves will be

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adequate for all warranty claims that arise. We have recently increased our use of reclaimed materials in the manufacturing of our products. While we performed extensive testing in connection with the utilization of such materials, the use of reclaimed materials represents a recent and significant change in our business and the use of such materials may result in unanticipated product quality or performance issues and an increase in warranty claims for certain of our products. We have also recently introduced a new warranty that provides coverage for labor costs incurred in the replacement of products under warranty under specified circumstances. Although we have significant experience regarding warranty claims on our products generally, we do not have historical experience relating to warranty claims under the terms of this new warranty coverage. Warranty obligations in excess of our reserves could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We depend on third parties for transportation services, and the lack of availability of and/or increases in the cost of transportation could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

Our business depends on the transportation of both finished goods to our distributors and other customers and the transportation of raw materials to us primarily through the use of flatbed trucks and rail transportation. We rely on third parties for transportation of these items. The availability of these transportation services is subject to various risks, including those associated with supply shortages, change in fuel prices, work stoppages, operating hazards and interstate transportation regulations. In particular, a significant portion of our finished goods are transported by flatbed trucks, which are occasionally in high demand (especially at the end of calendar quarters) and/or subject to price fluctuations based on market conditions and the price of fuel. In fiscal year 2021, we have experienced delays and challenges, including increases to freight and shipping costs and our ability to secure sufficient quantities of flatbed trucks and railcars necessary for our operations, both with respect to our procurement of raw materials and our delivery of our products, and such delays and challenges may result in a material adverse effect on our results of operations to the extent such shortages in transportation services or increases in transportation costs continue or worsen.

If the required supply of transportation services is unavailable when needed, we may be unable to sell our products when they are requested by our customers. In that event, we may be required to reduce the price of the affected products, seek alternative and, potentially more costly, transportation services or be unable to sell the affected products. Similarly, if any of these transportation providers were unavailable to deliver raw materials to us in a timely manner, we may be unable to manufacture our products in response to customer demand. In addition, a significant increase in transportation rates or fuel surcharges could adversely affect our profitability. Any of these events could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

Increases in labor costs, potential labor disputes and work stoppages or an inability to hire skilled manufacturing, sales and other personnel could adversely affect our business.

An increase in labor costs, work stoppages or disruptions at our facilities or those of our suppliers or transportation service providers, or other labor disruptions, could decrease our sales and increase our expenses. In addition, although our employees are not represented by a union, our labor force may become subject to labor union organizing efforts, which could cause us to incur additional labor costs and increase the related risks that we now face.

The competition for skilled manufacturing, sales and other personnel is often intense in the regions in which our manufacturing facilities are located. During 2021, the entire country experienced an overall tightening and increasingly competitive labor market. A sustained labor shortage or increased turnover rates within our employee base, caused by COVID-19, increases in the salaries and wages paid by competing employers, as a result of general macroeconomic factors or otherwise, could lead to increased costs, such as increased overtime to meet demand and increased salaries and wage rates to attract and retain employees, and could negatively affect our ability to efficiently operate our manufacturing facilities and overall business. If we are unable to hire and retain employees capable of performing at a high-level, or if mitigation measures we may take to respond to a decrease in labor availability have unintended negative consequences, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected. In addition, we are in the process of developing a new manufacturing facility in Boise, Idaho, and we will need to hire sufficient personnel to operate the facility. If we are unable to hire skilled manufacturing, sales and other personnel, our ability to execute our business plan, and our results of operations, would suffer.

If we are unable to collect accounts receivable from one or more of our significant distributors, dealers or other customers, our financial condition and operating results could suffer.

We extend credit to our distributors and, to a lesser extent, dealers and other customers, based on an evaluation of their financial condition, and we generally do not require collateral to secure these extensions of credit. The financial health of many of our customers is affected by changes in the economy and the cyclical nature of the building industry. The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and the related economic downturn or protracted or severe economic declines and cyclical downturns from other causes in the building industry may cause our customers to be unable to satisfy their payment obligations, including their debts to us. While we maintain allowances for credit losses, these allowances may not be adequate to provide for actual losses, and our financial condition and results of operation could be materially and adversely affected if our credit losses significantly exceed our estimates. While we maintain allowances for doubtful accounts, these allowances may not be adequate to provide for actual losses, and our financial condition and results of operation could be materially and adversely affected if our losses from doubtful accounts significantly exceed our estimates.

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If