Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - UTI

-New additions in green
-Changes in blue
-Hover to see similar sentence in last filing

Item 1A. “Risk Factors.”
The factors above are not exhaustive, and new factors may emerge or changes to the foregoing factors may occur that could impact our business. We cannot guarantee that any forward-looking statement will be realized. Achievement of future results is subject to risks, uncertainties and potentially inaccurate assumptions. Many events beyond our control may determine whether results we anticipate will be achieved. Should known or unknown risks or uncertainties materialize, or should underlying assumptions prove inaccurate, actual results could differ materially from past results and those anticipated, estimated or projected. Among the factors that could cause actual results to differ materially are the factors discussed under


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Part 1, Item 1. “Business” and Item 1A. “Risk Factors,” and Part II, Item 7. “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” You should bear this in mind as you consider forward-looking statements.
Also, these forward-looking statements represent our estimates and assumptions only as of the date of the document containing the applicable statement. Except as required by law, we undertake no obligation to update or revise forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. Thus, you should not assume that our silence over time means that actual events are bearing out as expressed or implied in such forward-looking statements. We qualify all of the forward-looking statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including the documents that we incorporate by reference herein, by these cautionary statements. We qualify all of the forward-looking statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including the documents that we 1Table of Contents incorporate by reference herein, by these cautionary statements. You are advised, however, to consult any further disclosures we make on related subjects in our reports and filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).


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PART I
ITEM 1. BUSINESS
Overview
Universal Technical Institute, Inc., which together with its subsidiaries is referred to as the “Company,” “we,” “us” or “our,” was founded in 1965 and is a leading workforce solutions provider of transportation, skilled trades and healthcare education programs, whose mission is to serve students, partners, and communities by providing quality education and support services for in-demand careers across a number of highly-skilled fields. We offer the majority of our programs in a blended learning model that combines instructor-facilitated online teaching and demonstrations with hands-on labs. In conjunction with the Concorde Career Colleges, Inc. acquisition on December 1, 2022 (the “Concorde Acquisition”), we redefined our reporting structure into two reportable segments (also referred to as “divisions”) as follows:
Universal Technical Institute (“UTI”): UTI operates 16 campuses located in nine states and offers a wide range of degree and non-degree transportation and skilled trades technical training programs under brands such as Universal Technical Institute, Motorcycle Mechanics Institute and Marine Mechanics Institute (collectively, “MMI”), NASCAR Technical Institute (“NASCAR Tech”), and MIAT College of Technology (“MIAT”). UTI also offers manufacturer specific advanced training programs, which include student-paid electives, at our campuses and manufacturer or dealer sponsored training at certain campuses and dedicated training centers. Additionally, we offer manufacturer specific advanced training (“MSAT”) programs, including student-paid electives, at our campuses and manufacturer or dealer sponsored training at certain campuses and dedicated training centers. Lastly, UTI provides dealer technician training or instructor staffing services to manufacturers.
Concorde Career Colleges (“Concorde”): Concorde operates 17 campuses located in eight states and online, offering degree, non-degree, and continuing education programs in the allied health, dental, nursing, patient care and diagnostic fields. The Company has designated campuses that offer degree granting programs “Concorde Career College;” where allowed by State regulation. The remaining campuses are designated as “Concorde Career Institute.” Concorde believes in preparing students for their healthcare careers with practical, hands-on experiences including opportunities to learn while providing care to real patients. Prior to graduation, students will complete a number of hours in a clinical setting or externship, depending upon their program of study. We acquired Concorde on December 1, 2022.
Corporate” includes corporate related expenses that are not allocated to the UTI or Concorde reportable segments. In prior years, these costs were allocated across our former “Postsecondary Education” reportable segment and “Other” category based upon compensation expense.
All of our campuses are institutionally accredited and are eligible for federal student financial assistance funds under the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (“HEA”), commonly referred to as Title IV Programs, which are administered by the U.S. Department of Education (“ED”). Many of our programs also are eligible for financial aid from federal sources other than Title IV Programs, such as the programs administered by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (“VA”) and under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.
Business Model and Industry Partnerships
We serve students, partners and communities by providing quality education and training for in-demand careers. We continue to evolve our business model to provide our students with accessible, affordable training with a focus on bringing education to the students at convenient locations.
Market served by UTI
The market for qualified transportation or skilled trades technicians across the programs that UTI offers is large and growing. The United States Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics (“U.S. DOL BLS”) estimates that an average of approximately 105,400 new job openings, due to growth and net replacements, will exist annually for newly trained technicians in the automotive, diesel, and collision fields through 2031. Additionally, for skilled trades and other transportation programs, the U.S. DOL BLS estimates that an average of 39,200 new jobs openings for industrial machinery mechanics, 42,600 new job openings for welders, 37,700 new job openings in the HVAC industry, 14,300 new job openings for computer-controlled machine tool operators, 12,800 new job openings for avionic technicians, 5,700 new job openings for robotics, 4,800 new job openings for marine and motorcycle technicians and 1,800 new job openings for wind turbine service technicians will exist annually for new entrants through 2032 in these fields.


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Market served by Concorde
The market for qualified healthcare support occupations across the programs that Concorde offers is growing even faster, with the U.S. DOL BLS estimating an annual average of 1,211,000 new jobs annually through 2032. Specifically, the U.S. DOL BLS estimates that an average of 193,100 new job openings for registered nurses, 114,600 new job openings for medical assistants, 55,100 new job openings for dental assistants, 44,900 new job openings for pharmacy technicians, 32,900 new job openings for occupational therapy and physical therapist assistants and aides, 26,300 new job openings for diagnostic related technologists and technicians, 24,000 new job openings for clinical laboratory technologists and technicians, 22,000 new job openings for massage therapists and 19,500 new job openings for phlebotomists will exist annually for new entrants through 2032 in these fields.
Recruitment
Our student recruitment efforts begin with our commitment to positive outcomes, both for our students and our industry relationships. We use a multi-touch media approach across our admissions channels. For UTI, there are three primary admissions channels (high school, adult, and military) to enroll and start students, which involves national and local outreach to generate a high quality and quantity of prospective students. We use a multi-touch media approach for our three primary admissions channels (high school, adult, and military) to enroll and start students, which involves national and local outreach to generate a high quality and quantity of prospective students. For Concorde, adults are the primary admissions channel, with an emphasis on those prospective adult students within the local proximity to a Concorde campus. To maximize the likelihood of student retention and graduation, our admissions process is intended to identify students who have the desire and ability to succeed in their chosen program. Prior to enrolling, many potential Concorde students complete a test which helps determine their expected success rate in a given program. In addition, we have established processes to identify students who may be in need of assistance to succeed in and complete their chosen program. To assist these students in graduating, we employ student service professionals that provide tutoring, and academic, financial, personal, and employment advisement. Additionally, as our campus locations do not offer housing for students, we have service professionals who leverage third-party relationships and assist our students in finding affordable housing near our campuses.
Industry Partnerships
To ensure the UTI programs provide students with the necessary hard and soft skills needed upon graduation, UTI has relationships with multiple original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”) and industry brand partners across the country to understand their needs for qualified service professionals. Through these industry relationships, UTI is able to continuously refine and expand its programs and curricula. Through our industry relationships, we are able to continuously refine and expand our programs and curricula. We believe the UTI industry-focused educational model and national presence has enabled the UTI division to develop valuable industry relationships, which provide it with significant competitive advantages and supports its market leadership, along with enabling the division to provide highly specialized education to its students, resulting in enhanced employment opportunities and the potential for higher wages for its graduates. We believe our industry-focused educational model and national presence have enabled us to develop valuable industry relationships, which provide us with significant competitive advantages and supports our market leadership, along with enabling us to provide highly specialized education to our students, resulting in enhanced employment opportunities and the potential for higher wages for our graduates.
The industry relationships for the UTI division also extend to thousands of local employers, after-market retailers, fleet service providers and enthusiast organizations.Our industry relationships also extend to thousands of local employers, after-market retailers, fleet service providers and enthusiast organizations. Other target groups for relationship-building, such as parts and tools suppliers, provide UTI with a variety of strategic and financial benefits that include equipment sponsorship, new product support, licensing and branding opportunities and financial sponsorship for the UTI campuses and students. Other target groups for relationship-building, such as parts and tools suppliers, provide us with a variety of strategic and financial benefits that include equipment sponsorship, new product support, licensing and branding opportunities and financial sponsorship for our campuses and students.
Concorde partners with dental and medical offices, clinics, and hospitals to provide technical and professional skills through quality clinical experiences. These clinical externship experiences are embedded in the program coursework to provide hands-on, real-world healthcare experiences and connect students with potential employers. Concorde has relationships with thousands of clinical affiliate partners nationwide that provide robust and varied exposure to patient populations and healthcare models. Many of these clinical affiliate partners participate in program advisory councils and contribute to Concorde’s efforts to continuously improve its program curriculum and resources. These partnerships provide early employment and graduate employment opportunities and have resulted in customized curricula to assist in upskilling partners' employees.
Business Strategy
Our business strategy has three key tenets: to grow the business by more deeply penetrating existing target markets and adding new markets; to diversify the business by adding new locations, programs, and offerings that maximize the lifetime value of our students; and to continually optimize the business by constantly enhancing operational efficiency.



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Company Growth, Diversification and Optimization
Our organization has a number of key levers to grow, diversify, and optimize the business. Organically, we have been successful by adding new locations and new programs. In 2022, UTI launched new transportation & skilled trades campuses in Austin, Texas and Miramar, Florida, further expanding its geographical footprint and opening access to highly populated locations in growing economies. Inorganically, in November 2021, we acquired MIAT College of Technology which has served both as a growth strategy by adding two new locations and a diversification strategy by adding additional program areas in rapidly expanding skilled trades professions. This acquisition also has allowed us to extrapolate these in-demand programs from MIAT and imbue them into existing UTI campuses which increases the offerings and addressable markets at existing locations. Continually optimizing program offerings and operations serves to further enhance overall operating margins and is a foundational element of our strategy.
In December 2022, we continued to diversify by expanding into healthcare education through the acquisition of Concorde. This acquisition enabled us to expand our program offerings into the high-growth and high-demand healthcare education market. Integration of core functions across education groups allows us to continue to optimize from an operational perspective.

Return on Education

We provide an excellent return on our students’ education investment by working with corporate partners and local communities to offer educational programs that are tailored to professional and industry standards. With a high focus on offering programs for in-demand careers, our graduates are well prepared to enter or re-enter the workforce in high demand areas that offer well-paying jobs. We actively engage corporate partners in defining our program outcomes, program offerings, and ongoing educational requirements to ensure students have the requisite skills to succeed in the workplace of today and have a foundation for tomorrow. We regularly evaluate program offerings, schedules and locations that are most appealing to students and aligned with employer expectations. For our Concorde offerings, where appropriate, we ensure that our courses are aligned with licensure requirements to ensure our students are provided the greatest opportunity for success. Where appropriate, these professionally aligned programs enable our students to gain licensure, certification, and credentials in high-demand healthcare professions. As a result, we believe we are well positioned to better meet the market’s demand for skilled technicians and healthcare workers.

In addition, we provide relevant services to assist students with possible tuition financing options, educational and career counseling, opportunities for part-time work while attending school, and ultimately graduate employment.We provide relevant services to assist students with possible tuition financing options, educational and career counseling, opportunities for part-time work while attending school, and ultimately, graduate employment. Our career services teams develop job opportunities and outreach, advise active students on employment search and interviewing skills, facilitate employer visits to campuses, provide access to reference materials, assist with the composition of resumes, and help students prepare for applicable certification or licensure exams. Our national career services team develops job opportunities and outreach, while our local career services teams advise active students on employment search and interviewing skills, facilitate employer visits to campuses, provide access to reference materials and assist with the composition of resumes.

Shared Success Model

Overall, our strategy and business model are built around the key principle of, “If you succeed, we succeed.” While operationally the Company has developed core competencies in marketing and enrollment management, the success of the business is not based solely on recruiting students, but rather retaining students through the program to graduation and facilitating their transition to employment in their field of study. Providing high-quality instruction in engaging curriculum aligned to industry and professional standards and delivering exemplary student support services to ensure students have everything they need to be successful serves as the foundation of our model. Retaining our students through to graduation and supporting them through to employment is the key principle of our business.

UTI Schools and Programs
UTI offers certificate, diploma or degree programs at campuses across the United States under the banner of several well-known brands. The majority of the UTI programs are designed to be completed in 30 to 100 weeks. The UTI advanced training programs range from 8 to 26 weeks in duration and are completed subsequent to satisfying the core UTI program requirements. These programs culminate in a certificate, diploma, associate of occupational studies degree, or associate of applied science degree depending on the program and campus. Tuition rates vary by type and length of our programs and the program level, such as core or advanced training.


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The table below sets forth the current locations that operate under the UTI division, the year the campus opened, and the principal programs taught at each location.
Description of Current UTI Programs Offered

Many of the UTI students receive their training in a blended learning model that combines instructor-facilitated online teaching and demonstrations with hands-on labs. The blended learning model not only increases access for students, but better prepares them to be life-long learners as technicians today perform many day-to-day tasks and continuing education courses online or on a digital device.
The table below provides an overview of the programs taught by UTI owned and operated institutions, including the year a program was first offered at one of the campuses, the focus of the program, and the type of employment the program is designed to prepare graduates to obtain.


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(1) Target job placement describes the type of employment the program is designed to prepare graduates to obtain. UTI graduates may also secure positions outside of the target job placement, including, for example, parts associate, service technician, fabricator, paint and preparation, and shop owner or operator, among others. Graduates may also secure positions outside of the Target Job Placement, including, for example, parts associate, service technician, fabricator, paint and preparation, and shop owner or operator, among others.
UTI Manufacturer Specific Advanced Training (“MSAT”) Programs

In addition to the program offerings noted above, UTI also offers advanced training programs in the form of manufacturer-paid post-graduate MSAT programs and in the form of student-paid MSAT courses, which may be added as electives to a student’s core automotive, diesel or motorcycle program.

UTI Manufacturer-Paid MSATs

A select number of UTI students are offered manufacturer-paid MSATs, which are paid for by the manufacturer and/or its dealers in return for a commitment by the student to work for a dealer of that manufacturer for a certain period of time upon completion of the program. UTI students who are high performing graduates of an automotive or diesel program may apply to be selected for these programs. Students who are high performing graduates of an automotive or diesel program may apply to be selected for these programs. The programs range from 8 to 26 weeks in duration. UTI’s manufacturer-paid MSATs are intended to offer in-depth instruction on specific manufacturers’ products, qualifying a graduate for employment with a dealer seeking highly specialized, entry-level technicians with brand-specific skills. Our manufacturer-paid MSATs are 8Table of Contents intended to offer in-depth instruction on specific manufacturers’ products, qualifying a graduate for employment with a dealer seeking highly specialized, entry-level technicians with brand-specific skills.

UTI currently offers the following manufacturer-paid MSAT programs using vehicles, equipment, specialty tools and curricula provided by its manufacturer brand partners:
UTI Student-Paid MSATs
UTI students may participate in student-paid MSAT programs upon successfully completing the necessary core curriculum prerequisites. UTI currently offers the following student-paid MSAT programs using vehicles, equipment, specialty tools and curricula provided by and/or developed in collaboration with its manufacturer brand partners:



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UTI Military Base Programs
In addition to the MSATs noted above, in partnership with the military and select industry partners, UTI has been developing and implementing advanced training programs for transitioning veterans at select military base locations. Military base programs differ from UTI’s traditional MSATs in that the students do not complete the traditional core programs at a UTI campus before entering these advanced training programs. Military base programs differ from our traditional MSATs in that the students do not complete our traditional core programs at a UTI campus before entering these advanced training programs. These programs range from 12 to 16 weeks and are available to all men and women transitioning out of the military. Candidates are interviewed and selected for these programs. Additionally, to be considered, candidates must be within six months of their separation dates from the military. There is no tuition cost to the participating service members.

UTI currently offers the following military base programs using vehicles, equipment, specialty tools and curricula provided by and/or developed in collaboration with certain manufacturer brand partners:
UTI Affordability and Accessibility

During the year ended September 30, 2023, tuition for UTI programs ranged from approximately $19,000 for the Industrial Maintenance Technician or Wind Turbine Technician programs (lasting 30 weeks) to $65,000 for the Automotive and Diesel program with one specialized elective program (lasting 90 weeks). During the year ended September 30, 2023, the average annual revenue per UTI student was approximately $33,000, net of scholarships or grants funded by the institution. During the year ended September 30, 2022, the average annual revenue per student was approximately $32,600, net of scholarships or grants funded by the institution. We are focused on making our training more affordable and accessible for the UTI students through financing options, proprietary loans, institutional and relocation grants, scholarships based on need and merit, and employer sponsored training and tuition reimbursement. We are focused on making our training more affordable and accessible through financing options, proprietary loans, institutional and relocation grants, scholarships based on need and merit, and employer sponsored training and tuition reimbursement. During the year ended September 30, 2023, approximately 40% of active UTI students received a UTI-funded scholarship or grant, approximately 45% of active UTI students participated in an “in school” cash payment plan, and approximately 15% of active UTI students received funding from UTI’s proprietary loan program. During the year ended September 30, 2022, approximately 42% of our active students received a UTI-funded scholarship or grant and approximately 22% of active students received funding from the proprietary loan program.

To maximize student affordability and speed to completion, UTI works with high schools across the nation to implement Technical Education Institutional Grant (“TEIG”) agreements. The TEIG agreements allow students who have completed course(s) related to their selected program of study to receive a corresponding tuition credit for up to six courses. UTI students may opt out of the courses provided they pass an Advanced Placement Opportunities Test for each selected course. Our students may opt out of the courses provided they pass an Advanced Placement Opportunities Test for each selected course. UTI has approximately 4,300 curriculum-specific TEIG agreements in place across the country. We have approximately 5,200 curriculum-specific TEIG agreements in place across the country. This represents approximately 9% of the high schools covered by the UTI admissions teams. This represents approximately 6% of the high schools covered by our admissions teams. UTI continues to identify new opportunities to expand the volume of these curriculum specific TEIG agreements.
In response to growing demand for trained technicians, UTI industry partners and employers are increasingly willing to participate in the UTI students’ cost of education by providing them with scholarship money and relocation assistance to attend school and by offering UTI graduates tuition reimbursement plans and competitive compensation and benefit packages, including signing bonuses, relocation grants and tool incentives.In response to growing demand for trained technicians, our industry partners and employers are increasingly willing to participate in our students’ cost of education by providing them with scholarship money and relocation assistance to attend school and by offering our graduates tuition reimbursement plans and competitive compensation and benefit packages, including signing bonuses, relocation grants and tool incentives. There are nearly 7,400 employer location incentive opportunities for UTI students, which when made available make the UTI training programs more affordable for students and may provide them with valuable relationships or employment opportunities following graduation. There are over 5,700 employer location incentive opportunities, which when made available make our training programs more affordable for students and may provide them with valuable relationships or employment opportunities following graduation.


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Concorde Schools and Programs
Concorde offers certificate, diploma or degree programs in the healthcare field at campuses across the United States under the Concorde Career Colleges or Concorde Career Institute brands. The majority of Concorde’s core programs are eight to ten months in duration. Clinical programs are 12 to 24 month programs. Clinical programs may have up to nine academic terms that last two to three months. The programs offered culminate in a diploma, associate of applied science degree or associate of science degree depending on the program and campus. These programs culminate in a certificate, diploma, associate of occupational studies degree, or associate of applied science degree depending on the program and campus. Tuition rates vary by type and length of our programs and the program level, such as core or advanced training.

The table below sets forth the current locations that operate under the Concorde brand, the year the campus opened, and the principal programs taught at each location.The table below sets forth our current locations that operate under the UTI, MMI, NASCAR Tech, and MIAT brands, the year the campus opened, and the principal programs taught at each location.


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Description of Current Concorde Programs Offered

Many of Concorde’s students receive their training in a blended training model that combines instructor-facilitated online teaching and demonstrations with hands-on labs. The blended learning model not only increases access for students, but better prepares them to be life-long learners as students today perform many day-to-day tasks and continuing education courses online or on a digital device. The blended learning model not only increases access for students, but better prepares them to be life-long learners as technicians today perform many day-to-day tasks and continuing education courses online or on a digital device.
The table below provides an overview of the programs taught by Concorde institutions, including the year a program was first offered at one of the campuses, the focus of the program, and the type of employment the program is designed to prepare graduates to obtain.The table below provides an overview of the programs taught by UTI owned and operated institutions, including the year a program was first offered at one of our campuses, the focus of the program, and the type of employment the program was designed to prepare graduates to obtain.


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(1) Target job placement describes the type of employment the program is designed to prepare graduates to obtain. Concorde graduates may also secure positions outside of the target job placement, including various other healthcare related positions.
Concorde Affordability and Accessibility
During the year ended September 30, 2023, tuition for Concorde programs ranged from approximately $14,000 for the Pharmacy Technician program (lasting 24 weeks) to $96,000 for the Dental Hygiene program in California (lasting 90 weeks). During the year ended September 30, 2023, the average annual revenue per Concorde student was approximately


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$23,000, net of scholarships or grants funded by the institution. We are focused on making the Concorde training more affordable and accessible through financing options, institutional and relocation grants, and scholarships based on need and merit. Concorde currently and historically offers certain students retail installment contracts for payment of their tuition that is not covered by federal student financial aid or other funding sources. Continued or increased examination of the for-profit education sector could result in further legislation, appropriations, regulations, and enforcement actions that could materially and adversely affect our business. During the year ended September 30, 2023, approximately 11% of Concorde’s active students received a Concorde-funded scholarship or grant and approximately 64% of Concorde active students received funding through Concorde sponsored retail installment contracts. During the year ended September 30, 2022, approximately 42% of our active students received a UTI-funded scholarship or grant and approximately 22% of active students received funding from the proprietary loan program.
Student Enrollment
UTI enrolls students throughout the year with courses typically starting every three to six weeks. Concorde enrolls students throughout the year with core terms starting every month and clinical terms starting every ten weeks. The table below outlines our new student starts, average undergraduate full-time students, and end of period undergraduate full-time students for both UTI and Concorde.
(1) Student data for Concorde presented in the year ended September 30, 2023 column represents the period of UTI’s ownership, or December 1, 2022 through September 30, 2023.
Due to the seasonality of our business and normal fluctuations in student populations, we expect variability in our quarterly results. See "Seasonality" within Part II, Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for further discussion of seasonal fluctuations in our revenues and operating results.

Graduate Employment
Identifying employment opportunities and preparing our graduates for their future careers is critical to our ability to deliver value to our graduates from their education. Additionally, we are required to meet certain graduate placement standards by location and program by both our national and programmatic accreditors. Accordingly, we dedicate significant resources to maintaining an effective career services team. Our campus-based staff facilitate several career development processes, including instruction and coaching for interview skills, interview etiquette and professionalism. Additionally, the career services team provides students with reference materials and assistance with the composition of resumes. Finally, we place emphasis on and devote significant time to assisting students with part-time and graduate job searches.
We also have centralized departments for each segment whose focus is to build and maintain relationships with potential and existing national employers and develop graduate job opportunities and, where possible, relocation assistance, sign-on bonuses, tool packages and tuition reimbursement plans with our manufacturer brand partners and other industry employers.We also have a centralized department whose focus is to build and maintain relationships with potential and existing national employers and develop graduate job opportunities and, where possible, relocation assistance, sign-on bonuses, tool packages and tuition reimbursement plans with our manufacturer brand partners and other industry employers. Together, the campuses and centralized departments coordinate and host career fairs, industry awareness presentations, interview days and employer visits to our campus locations. Together, the campuses and centralized department coordinate and host career fairs, industry awareness presentations, interview days and employer visits to our campus locations. We believe that our graduate career services provide our students with a compelling value proposition and enhance the employment opportunities for our graduates and are a competitive differentiator from other education institutions.


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Competition
The for-profit, postsecondary education industry is highly competitive and highly fragmented, with no one provider controlling significant market share. We compete with other institutions that are eligible to receive Title IV funding, including not-for-profit public and private schools, community colleges and for-profit institutions which offer programs similar to ours. We compete with other institutions that are eligible to receive Title IV funding, including not-for-profit public and private schools, community colleges and for-profit institutions which offer automotive, diesel, collision repair, motorcycle, marine, welding, CNC machining, aviation, HVACR, robotics, and closely related skilled 11Table of Contents trades training programs. Our competition differs in each market depending on the curriculum we offer and the availability of other choices, including job prospects. Other competitive factors that influence our ability to attract new students include the employment market, community colleges, other career-oriented and technical schools, and the military.
Prospective students may choose to forego additional education and enter the workforce directly, especially during periods when the unemployment rate declines or remains stable as it has in recent years. This may include employment with our industry partners or with other manufacturers and employers of our graduates.
We compete with local community colleges for students seeking programs that are similar to ours, mainly due to local accessibility, low tuition rates and in certain cases free tuition. Public institutions are generally able to charge lower tuition than our schools, due in part to government subsidies and other financial sources not available to for-profit schools. No single community college is a significant competitor; rather, the sector as a whole provides competition.
Within the for-profit education sector, some of our public company competitors are Adtalem Global Education, Inc., American Public Education, Inc., Lincoln Educational Services Corporation, Perdoceo Education Corporation, and Strategic Education, Inc. We also consider other regional or single location institutions with a larger local presence near one of our campuses to be competitors. We also consider other single location institutions with a larger local presence near one of our campuses to be competitors. Competition is generally based on location, tuition rates, the type of programs offered, the quality of instruction and instructional facilities, graduate employment rates, reputation and recruiting. Additionally, the military often recruits or retains potential students when branches of the military offer enlistment or re-enlistment bonuses.

Human Capital Management
As of September 30, 2023, we had approximately 3,000 full-time employees, including approximately 850 instructors, 550 admissions representatives, and 1,100 student support employees.
Each of our employees plays a key role in our mission to serve students, partners and communities by providing quality education and training for in-demand careers. We believe that diversity, equity, and inclusion (“DE&I”) among our employees is essential in this process, as a truly innovative educational institution relies on a wealth of backgrounds and experiences to enhance student outcomes. We have a Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion who is responsible for setting the DE&I strategy and roadmap to ensure that we meet our objectives both internally, of creating a company where everyone feels they belong, and externally, by working closely with our marketing and talent acquisition functions to attract diverse talent. To attract a truly diverse workforce, we strive to instill a culture where employees are encouraged to draw upon their own unique skills and perspectives when engaging with our growing and diverse student population.
Faculty members are hired nationally in accordance with established criteria, applicable accreditation standards and applicable state regulations. Members of our faculty are primarily industry professionals and are hired based on their prior work and educational experience. We require a specific level of industry experience in order to enhance the quality of the programs we offer and to address current and industry-specific issues in our course content. We provide intensive instructional training and continuing education to our faculty members to maintain the quality of instruction in all fields of study. A majority of our existing instructors have a minimum of five years’ experience in the industry and an average of seven years of experience teaching at UTI and four years of experience teaching at Concorde.
We employ field, military and campus-based admissions representatives who work directly with prospective students to facilitate the enrollment process. Additionally, each campus has a support team that typically includes a campus president, an education director, a financial aid director, a student services director, and a career services director. Additionally, each school has a support team that typically includes a campus president, an education director, a financial aid director, a student services director, and an career services director.
We believe our corporate and divisional management teams have the experience necessary to effectively implement our growth and diversification strategy and continue to drive positive educational and employment outcomes for our students. For discussion of the risks relating to the attraction and retention of management and executive management employees, see Item 1A. “Risk Factors.”


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Environmental Matters
UTI uses hazardous materials at its training facilities and campuses and generates small quantities of regulated waste, including, but not limited to, used oil, antifreeze, transmission fluid, paint, solvents, car batteries and aircraft batteries. As a result, the UTI facilities and operations are subject to a variety of environmental laws and regulations governing, among other things, the use, storage and disposal of solid and hazardous substances and waste, and the clean-up of contamination at UTI facilities or off-site locations to which UTI sends or has sent waste for disposal. As a result, our facilities and operations are subject to a variety of environmental laws and regulations governing, among other things, the use, storage and disposal of solid and hazardous substances and waste, and the clean-up of contamination at our 12Table of Contents facilities or off-site locations to which we send or have sent waste for disposal. Certain of the UTI campuses are required to obtain permits for air emissions. Certain of our campuses are required to obtain permits for our air emissions. In the event UTI does not maintain compliance with any of these laws and regulations, or if UTI is responsible for a spill or release of hazardous materials, UTI could incur significant costs for clean-up, damages, and fines or penalties. In the event we do not maintain compliance with any of these laws and regulations, or if we are responsible for a spill or release of hazardous materials, we could incur significant costs for clean-up, damages, and fines or penalties.

Concorde monitors and follows all regulatory guidelines for any bloodborne pathogens, chemicals, or gases that the school purchases and uses. Concorde has biohazardous waste that is produced in many of its programs including, but not limited to, disposables contaminated with blood and body fluids and contaminated sharps such as needles. Where applicable, the programs use appropriate decontamination, cleaning, and sterilizing methods and processes on all required reusable products or equipment. Concorde programs also purchase and use many different chemicals and substances for skills practice and cleaning. These chemicals and substances are handled per the manufacturer guidelines, and the MSDS lists are maintained at the campus per regulations in the event of any adverse reaction. Concorde contracts with several vendors for approved and appropriate disposal of any chemical products or contaminated bloodborne pathogen items. Some of Concorde’s programs utilize gases including, but not limited to, Oxygen and Nitrous Oxide. These gases are purchased from commercial vendors and are stored, maintained, and disposed of per the manufacturer and regulatory guidelines.

Regulatory Environment
Our institutions are subject to extensive regulatory requirements imposed by a wide range of federal and state agencies, as well as by institutional and programmatic accreditors. These regulatory requirements cover the vast majority of our operations, including our educational programs, facilities, instructional and administrative staff, administrative procedures, marketing, recruiting, financial operations and financial condition. These regulatory requirements also affect our ability to acquire, expand or open additional institutions or campuses, to revise or expand our educational programs, and to change our corporate structure and ownership.
The approvals granted by these entities permit our schools to operate and to participate in a variety of government-sponsored financial aid programs that assist students in paying for their education. The most significant of these is the federal student aid programs administered by ED pursuant to HEA Title IV Programs. Generally, to participate in Title IV Programs, an institution must be licensed or otherwise legally authorized to operate in the state where it is physically located, be accredited by an accreditor recognized by ED, be certified as an eligible institution by ED, offer at least one eligible program of education, and comply with other statutory and regulatory requirements.
We also are subject to oversight by other federal agencies including the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”), the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”), the Internal Revenue Service and the Departments of Veterans Affairs (“VA”), Defense (“DOD”), Treasury, Labor, and Justice. Below, we discuss certain elements of this regulatory environment.
State and Accreditor Approvals
State Authorization
To operate and offer postsecondary programs, and to be certified to participate in Title IV Programs, each of our institutions must obtain and maintain authorization from the state in which it is physically located (“Home State”). To engage in educational or recruiting activities outside of its Home State, each institution also may be required to obtain and maintain authorization from the states in which it is educating or recruiting students. The level of regulatory oversight varies substantially from state to state and is extensive in some states. State laws may establish standards for instruction, qualifications of faculty, location and nature of facilities and equipment, administrative procedures, marketing, recruiting, student outcomes reporting, disclosure obligations to students, limitations on mandatory arbitration clauses in enrollment agreements, financial operations, and other operational matters. Some states prescribe standards of financial responsibility and mandate that institutions post surety bonds. Many states have requirements for institutions to disclose institutional data to current and prospective students, as well as to the public, and some states require that our schools meet prescribed performance standards as a condition of continued approval. States can and often do revisit, revise, and expand their regulations governing postsecondary education and recruiting.


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Institutions that offer instruction outside of their Home State must comply with federal regulations governing state authorization for distance education in order to participate in the Title IV student financial aid programs. All UTI institutions and the Concorde Kansas City and Memphis institutions are authorized to participate in the State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (“SARA”). SARA is an agreement among member states, districts and territories of the United States of America that establishes comparable national standards for interstate offering of post-secondary distance education courses and programs. SARA is an agreement among member states, districts and territories that establishes comparable national standards for interstate offering of post-secondary distance education courses and programs. SARA is overseen by a national council (“NC-SARA”) and administered by four regional education compacts. Forty-nine states (all but California), the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands have joined SARA.

Each of our institutions holds the state or SARA authorizations required to operate and offer postsecondary education programs, and to recruit in the states in which it engages in recruiting activities. We also have received approval from the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (“ACCSC”) and the Council on Occupational Education (“COE”) to permanently offer blended format programs that utilize both distance and on-ground education. Additionally, we have received permanent approvals from all state education authorizing agencies to offer blended format programs. We continue to work to ensure that we comply with applicable distance education rules and standards. We also will closely monitor any new rulemakings that concern state authorization or distance education.

State Licensing Boards

Many educational programs leading to professional licensure in a regulated profession require approval from, and are subject to, ongoing oversight by state agencies or boards. For example, certain Concorde healthcare programs, such as the Vocational Nursing, Practical Nursing, Dental Assistant, Massage Therapy, and Nursing Practice (RN) programs, require and have obtained state licensure. Such programs are required to meet the standards of the state licensure agency or board and Concorde must periodically renew these licenses by completing a comprehensive license renewal process.

Institutional Accreditation

Institutional accreditation is a non-governmental process through which an institution voluntarily submits to ongoing qualitative reviews by an organization of peer institutions. Institutional accreditation by an ED-recognized accreditor is required for an institution to be certified to participate in Title IV Programs. All of the UTI institutions and 14 of the Concorde institutions are accredited by the ACCSC. The remaining two Concorde institutions are accredited by the COE. Both ACCSC and COE are accrediting agencies recognized by ED.

ACCSC and COE review the academic quality of each institution’s instructional programs, as well as the administrative and financial operations of the institution to ensure that it has the resources necessary to perform its educational mission, implement continuous improvement processes, and support student success. Our institutions are subject to periodic review to confirm accreditation standards are met, and must submit annual reports, and at times, supplemental reports, to demonstrate ongoing compliance and improvement. ACCSC and COE require institutions to disclose certain institutional information to current and prospective students, as well as to the public, and require that our schools and programs meet various performance standards as a condition of continued accreditation. ACCSC requires institutions to disclose certain institutional information to current and prospective students, as well as to the public, and requires that our schools and programs meet various performance standards as a condition of continued accreditation. ACCSC and COE often revisit, revise, and expand their standards and policies. ACCSC often revisits, revises, and expands its standards and policies. Institutions must periodically renew their accreditation by completing a comprehensive renewal of accreditation process. Due to scheduling and resource limitations, an institution’s grant of accreditation at times may expire on its face prior to the completion of a renewal cycle. In such cases, the institution’s accreditation remains in place until the renewal cycle is complete, and a new grant of accreditation is issued.

We strive to maintain the highest standards. Currently 16 of our campuses are classified as ACCSC Schools of Excellence or ACCSC Schools of Distinction. Five of our campuses have achieved this award twice in their history, and two campuses have received this award three times in their history. Six of our campuses have achieved this award twice in their history, and one campus has received this award three times in its history.



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The tables below set out the renewal of accreditation cycle for each of our schools:
(1) Indicates a school that has achieved School of Distinction status during its most recent renewal of accreditation, which recognizes accredited member schools that demonstrated a commitment to the expectations and rigors of ACCSC accreditation, as well as a commitment to delivering quality educational programs to students.
(2) Indicates a school that has achieved School of Excellence status during its most recent renewal of accreditation, which recognizes ACCSC-accredited institutions for their commitment to the expectations and rigors of ACCSC accreditation, as well as the efforts made by the institution in maintaining high levels of achievement among their students.(2) Indicates a school that has achieved School of Distinction status during its most recent renewal of accreditation, which recognizes accredited member schools that demonstrated a commitment to the expectations and rigors of ACCSC accreditation, as well as a commitment to delivering quality educational programs to students.
(3) New schools are initially accredited for a two-year term after which they are then eligible to renew for the longer five or six year renewal cycle.(3) New schools are initially accredited for a two year term after which they are then eligible to renew for the longer five or six year renewal cycle.


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(4) Indicates a school that has achieved School of Excellence status during its most recent renewal of accreditation, which recognizes ACCSC-accredited institutions for their commitment to the expectations and rigors of ACCSC accreditation, as well as the efforts made by the institution in maintaining high levels of achievement among their students.
Programmatic Accreditation
In addition to institutional accreditation, programmatic accreditation may be required for particular educational programs. Programmatic accreditors review specialized and professional programs in a range of fields and disciplines within an institution to ensure the public that an academic program has undergone a rigorous review process and found to meet high standards for educational quality. Certain Concorde healthcare programs, including the Physical Therapist Assistant, Dental Hygiene, Neurodiagnostic Technology, Polysomnographic Technology, Respiratory Therapy, Surgical Technology, Radiologic Technology, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Cardiovascular Sonography, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Pharmacy Technician, and Occupational Therapy Assistant programs, have obtained programmatic accreditation. Such programs are required to meet the standards of their programmatic accreditor and Concorde must periodically renew these accreditations by completing a comprehensive programmatic accreditation renewal process.

Title IV Programs

The federal government provides a substantial part of its support for postsecondary education through Title IV Programs in the form of grants and loans to students who can use those funds at any institution that has been certified as eligible to participate by ED.

Title IV grants include Federal Pell Grants (the “Pell Grants”) and Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grants (“FSEOG”). Pell Grants are available to eligible undergraduate students who demonstrate financial need and who have not already received a baccalaureate degree and do not need to be repaid. FSEOG grants are designed to supplement Pell Grants for students with the greatest financial need. Institutions must provide matching funding equal to 25% of all awards made under the FSEOG program.

Title IV loans include Direct Subsidized loans, Direct Unsubsidized loans, and Direct Parent PLUS loans. Direct Subsidized loans and Direct Unsubsidized loans are federal student loans offered to help eligible students cover the cost of higher education at a four-year college or university, community college, or trade, career, or technical school. Direct Subsidized loans are available to undergraduate students with financial need. Direct Unsubsidized loans are available to undergraduate and graduate students, and there is no requirement to demonstrate financial need. Direct Parent PLUS loans are federal loans that parents of dependent undergraduate students can use to help pay for schools that participate in the Direct Loan program.

All of our institutions are certified to participate in Title IV Programs. The HEA, which authorizes Title IV Programs, has not been comprehensively reauthorized since 2008. Despite repeated attempts, Congress has not completed a full reauthorization since then. In addition to HEA reauthorization, policies directly related to Title IV Programs and funding for those programs may be impacted by the annual budget and appropriations process as well as by other legislation. At this time, we cannot predict all or any of the changes that Congress may ultimately make, and any of those changes could potentially have a material adverse effect on our business and operations. At this 14Table of Contents time, we cannot predict all or any of the changes that Congress may ultimately make, and any of those changes could potentially have a material adverse effect on our business and operations.

Overall, in fiscal year 2023, across our institutions, we derived approximately 67% of our revenues, on a cash basis as defined by ED, from Title IV Programs. We derived approximately 46% of our revenues, on a cash basis, from the Direct Loan program, pursuant to which ED makes loans to students or their parents. We derived approximately 20% of our revenues, on a cash basis, from the Pell Program. We derived approximately 18% of our revenues, on a cash basis, from the Pell program, pursuant to which ED makes grants to students who demonstrate financial need. And we derived less than 1% of our revenues, on a cash basis, from FSEOG. And we derived less than 1% of our revenues, on a cash basis, from the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (“FSEOG”) program.

The Title IV Program statutes and regulations are applied primarily on an institutional basis. The HEA defines an “institution” as a main campus and its additional locations. Pursuant to this definition, ED recognizes the Company as owning and operating sixteen institutions (“OPE IDs”), organized as follows:



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To obtain and maintain certification as eligible to participate in Title IV Programs, institutions must demonstrate ongoing compliance with the HEA and its extensive and complex implementing regulations; regulations that ED frequently revisits, revises, and expands. Because all of our institutions are certified to participate in Title IV Programs, they must all comply with this complex framework of statutes, regulations, and guidance, and undergo detailed oversight and review. Because all of our institutions are certified to participate in Title IV Programs, they must all comply with this complex framework of statutes, 15Table of Contents regulations, and guidance, and undergo detailed oversight and review. Below, we discuss the core components of the Title IV Programs’ regulatory framework.
Eligibility and Recertification

All institutions participating in the Title IV Programs must first establish their eligibility to do so. The Program Participation Agreement (“PPA”) document serves as ED’s formal recognition that an institution and its associated additional locations


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have satisfied this requirement and are authorized to participate in Title IV Programs for a specified period of time. An institution seeking to expand its activities in certain ways, such as opening an additional location or raising the highest academic credential it offers, must obtain approval from ED. Every institution is also required to periodically renew its certification by applying for continued certification before its current term of certification expires. Terms of certification are typically six years but can be three years or shorter. Each of our institutions participates in the Title IV Programs through a PPA. Those institutions that recently have been acquired (MIAT and Concorde) participate pursuant to a provisional PPA, which is standard for institutions that have recently undergone a change in ownership or control. A provisional PPA attaches additional requirements and limitations to participation for the duration of the provisional period, which typically is three years.

The 90/10 Rule

As a condition of participation in Title IV Programs, proprietary institutions must agree when they sign their PPA to comply with the 90/10 rule. Under the 90/10 rule, to remain eligible to participate in the federal student aid programs, a proprietary institution must derive at least 10% of their revenue from sources other than “Federal education assistance funds. Under the current 90/10 rule, to remain eligible to participate in the federal student aid programs, a proprietary institution cannot derive more than 90% of its revenues for each fiscal year from Title IV Program funds. ” “Federal education assistance funds” are defined as “federal funds that are disbursed or delivered to or on behalf of a student to be used to attend such institution.” The phrase “Federal education assistance funds” was broadly defined as “federal funds that are disbursed or delivered to or on behalf of a student to be used to attend such institution.

We regularly monitor compliance with the 90/10 requirement to minimize the risk that any of our institutions would derive more than the allowable maximum percentage of its revenue from Title IV Programs for any fiscal year. As of September 30, 2023, our institutions’ annual Title IV percentages as calculated under the current 90/10 rule ranged from approximately 57% to approximately 86%. As of September 30, 2022, our institutions’ annual Title IV percentages as calculated under the current 90/10 rule ranged from approximately 64% to 70% between our institution’s four OPE IDs.

Administrative Capability

To continue its participation in Title IV Programs, an institution must demonstrate that it remains administratively capable of providing the education it promises and of properly managing its Title IV Programs. ED assesses the administrative capability of each institution that participates in Title IV Programs under a series of standards listed in the regulations, which cover a wide range of operational and administrative topics, including the designation of capable and qualified individuals, the quality and scope of written procedures, the adequacy of institutional communication and processes, the timely resolution of issues, the sufficiency of recordkeeping, and the frequency of findings of noncompliance. ED’s administrative capability standards also include thresholds and expectations for federal student loan cohort default rates (discussed below), satisfactory academic progress, and loan counseling. Failure to satisfy any of the standards may lead ED to find the institution ineligible to participate in Title IV Programs, require the institution to repay Title IV Program funds, change the method of payment of Title IV Program funds, place the institution on provisional certification as a condition of its continued participation in Title IV Programs, or take other actions against the institution.

Three-Year Student Loan Default Rates

To remain eligible to participate in Title IV Programs, institutions also must maintain federal student loan cohort default rates below specified levels. ED calculates an institution’s cohort default rate on an annual basis. Under the current calculation, the cohort default rate is derived from student borrowers who first enter loan repayment during a federal fiscal year (“FFY”) ending September 30 and subsequently default on those loans within the two following years; parent borrowers are excluded from the calculation. This represents a three-year measuring period.



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The following tables set forth the most recent three-year cohort default rates for our institutions:
(1) Based on information published by ED.
(2) Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, ED paused all loan payments from March 13, 2020 through October 1, 2023. This has significantly decreased the default rates starting with the 2019 Cohort and resulted in 0% for the 2020 Cohort.(2) Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, ED paused all loan payments from March 13, 2020 through December 31, 2022. This has significantly decreased the default rates starting with the 2019 Cohort.
(3) As of September 30, 2023, these institutions were subject to a 30-day delay in receiving the first disbursement on federal student loans for first-time borrowers due to a three-year cohort default rate that was 15% or greater for one of the three most recent years.
(4) We completed the acquisition of MIAT on November 1, 2021 and Concorde on December 1, 2022. As a result, the cohort default rates presented here relate to periods prior to our ownership. However, because these rates affect our current collection timing on disbursements of federal student loans, we have included the rates within the table. However, since these rates affect our current collection timing on disbursements of federal student loans, we have included the rates within the table.
(5) Includes other proprietary institutions beyond the Company.
An institution whose cohort default rate exceeds 30% in consecutive fiscal years may be subject to conditions and restrictions and will lose eligibility if the rate remains above 30% three years in a row. An institution also will lose eligibility if its rate exceeds 40% for any fiscal year. As demonstrated in the table above, none of our institutions had a three-year cohort default rate of 30% or greater for 2020, 2019, or 2018, which are the three most recent FFYs with published rates. As demonstrated in the table above, none of our institutions had a three-year cohort default rate of 30% or greater for 2019, 2018 or 2017, for the three most recent FFYs with published rates. An institution whose three-year cohort default rate is 15% or greater for any one of the three preceding years is subject to a 30-day delay in receiving the first disbursement on federal student loans for first-time borrowers.

Financial Responsibility

All institutions participating in Title IV Programs also must satisfy specific ED standards of financial responsibility. Among other things, an institution must meet all of its financial obligations, including required refunds to students and any Title IV Program liabilities and debts, be current in its debt payments, comply with certain past performance requirements, and not receive an adverse, qualified, or disclaimed opinion by its accountants in its audited financial statements. Each year, ED also evaluates institutions’ financial responsibility by calculating a “composite score,” which measures an institution’s overall financial health. Each year, ED also evaluates institutions’ financial responsibility by calculating a “composite score,” which utilizes information provided in the institutions’ annual audited financial statements. The composite score utilizes information provided in the institutions’ annual audited financial statements and is based on three ratios: (1) the equity ratio which measures the institution’s capital resources, ability to borrow and financial


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viability; (2) the primary reserve ratio which measures the institution’s ability to support current operations from expendable resources; and (3) the net income ratio which measures the institution’s ability to operate at a profit.

ED assigns a strength factor to the results of each of these ratios on a scale from negative 1.0 to positive 3.0, with negative 1.0 reflecting financial weakness and positive 3.0 reflecting financial strength. ED then assigns a weighting percentage to each ratio and adds the weighted scores for the three ratios together to produce a composite score for the institution. If an institution’s composite score is above 1.5, and it meets all other requirements, it is deemed financially responsible. If its composite score is below 1.5, but at least 1.0, the institution is still considered to be financially responsible, but must agree to additional oversight by ED in the form of cash monitoring and other participation requirements. If its 17Table of Contents composite score is below 1.5, but at least 1.0, the institution is still considered to be financially responsible, but must agree to additional oversight by ED in the form of cash monitoring and other participation requirements.