Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - BBDC

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$BBDC Risk Factor changes from 00/02/23/22/2022 to 00/02/22/24/2024

Item 1A.

— Risk Factors Risks Relating to Our Business and Structure — Incurring additional leverage may magnify our exposure to risks associated with changes in leverage, including fluctuations in interest rates that could adversely affect our profitability” included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.Code of Business Conduct and Ethics and Corporate Governance GuidelinesWe and Barings have adopted a code of ethics (the “Global Code of Ethics Policy”) and corporate governance guidelines, which collectively cover ethics and business conduct. These documents apply to our and Barings’ directors, officers and employees, including our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller, and any person performing similar functions, and establish procedures for personal investments and restrict certain personal securities transactions. Personnel subject to the Global Code of Ethics Policy and corporate governance guidelines may invest in securities for their personal investment accounts, including securities that may be purchased or held by us, so long as such investments are made in accordance with the code’s requirements. Our Global Code of Ethics Policy and corporate governance guidelines are publicly 24available on the Investor Relations section of our website under “Corporate Governance” at https://ir.barings.com/governance-docs. We will report any amendments to or waivers of a required provision of our Global Code of Ethics Policy and corporate governance guidelines on our website or in a Current Report on Form 8-K.

Information contained on our website is not incorporated by reference into this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and you should not consider that information to be part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.Compliance Policies and ProceduresWe and Barings have adopted and implemented written policies and procedures reasonably designed to prevent violation of the U.S. federal securities laws, and are required to review these compliance policies and procedures annually for their adequacy and the effectiveness of their implementation, and to designate a chief compliance officer to be responsible for administering such policies and procedures. Gregory MacCordy serves as our Chief Compliance Officer.Proxy Voting Policies and ProceduresWe delegate our proxy voting responsibilities to Barings. Barings votes proxies relating to our portfolio securities in a manner which we believe will be in the best interest of our stockholders. Barings reviews on a case-by-case basis each proposal submitted to a stockholder vote to determine its impact on the portfolio securities held by us. Although Barings generally votes against proposals that may have a negative impact on our portfolio securities, they may vote for such a proposal if there exists compelling long-term reasons to do so.The proxy voting decisions of Barings are made by the investment professionals who are responsible for monitoring each of its clients’ investments. To ensure that their vote is not the product of a conflict of interest, Barings requires that: (i) anyone involved in the decision making process disclose to our chief compliance officer any potential conflict that he or she is aware of and any contact that he or she has had with any interested party regarding a proxy vote; and (ii) employees involved in the decision making process or vote administration are prohibited from revealing how we intend to vote on a proposal in order to reduce any attempted influence from interested parties.Stockholders may, without charge, obtain information regarding how we voted proxies with respect to our portfolio securities by making a written request for proxy voting information to: Chief Compliance Officer, 300 South Tryon Street, Suite 2500, Charlotte, North Carolina 28202 or by calling our investor relations department at 888-401-1088.OtherWe may also be prohibited under the 1940 Act from knowingly participating in certain transactions with our affiliates without the prior approval of those members of the Board who are not interested persons and, in some cases, prior approval by the SEC. The 1940 Act prohibits us from making certain negotiated co-investments with affiliates absent prior approval of the SEC. Barings’ existing Exemptive Relief permits us and Barings’ affiliated private funds and SEC-registered funds to co-invest in loans originated by Barings, which allows Barings to implement its senior secured private debt investment strategy for us.We are periodically examined by the SEC for compliance with the 1940 Act.We are required to provide and maintain a bond issued by a reputable fidelity insurance company to protect us against larceny and embezzlement. Furthermore, as a BDC, we are prohibited from protecting any director or officer against any liability to us or our stockholders arising from willful misfeasance, bad faith, gross negligence or reckless disregard of the duties involved in the conduct of such person’s office.25Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Sarbanes-Oxley Act ComplianceWe are subject to the reporting and disclosure requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), including the filing of quarterly, annual and current reports, proxy statements and other required items. In addition, we are subject to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), which imposes a wide variety of regulatory requirements on publicly-held companies and their insiders. For example:•pursuant to Rule 13a-14 of the Exchange Act, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer are required to certify the accuracy of the financial statements contained in our periodic reports;•pursuant to Item 307 of Regulation S-K, our periodic reports are required to disclose our conclusions about the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures;•pursuant to Rule 13a-15 of the Exchange Act, our management is required to prepare a report regarding its assessment of our internal control over financial reporting and must obtain an audit of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting performed by our independent registered public accounting firm; and•pursuant to Item 308 of Regulation S-K and Rule 13a-15 of the Exchange Act, our periodic reports must disclose whether there were significant changes in our internal control over financial reporting or in other factors that could significantly affect these controls subsequent to the date of their evaluation, including any corrective actions with regard to significant deficiencies and material weaknesses. For example:•pursuant to Rule 13a-14 of the Exchange Act, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer are required to certify the accuracy of the financial statements contained in our periodic reports;28•pursuant to Item 307 of Regulation S-K, our periodic reports are required to disclose our conclusions about the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures;•pursuant to Rule 13a-15 of the Exchange Act, our management is required to prepare a report regarding its assessment of our internal control over financial reporting; and•pursuant to Item 308 of Regulation S-K and Rule 13a-15 of the Exchange Act, our periodic reports must disclose whether there were significant changes in our internal control over financial reporting or in other factors that could significantly affect these controls subsequent to the date of their evaluation, including any corrective actions with regard to significant deficiencies and material weaknesses. The New York Stock Exchange Corporate Governance RegulationsThe NYSE has adopted corporate governance regulations that listed companies must comply with. We believe we currently are in compliance with such corporate governance listing standards. We intend to monitor our compliance with all future listing standards and to take all necessary actions to ensure that we stay in compliance.Material U.S. Federal Income Tax ConsiderationsThe following discussion is a general summary of the material U.S. federal income tax considerations applicable to us and to an investment in our shares. This summary does not purport to be a complete description of the income tax considerations applicable to us or to investors in such an investment. For example, we have not described tax consequences that we assume to be generally known by investors or certain considerations that may be relevant to certain types of holders subject to special treatment under U.S. federal income tax laws, including stockholders subject to the alternative minimum tax, tax-exempt organizations, insurance companies, dealers in securities, pension plans and trusts, financial institutions, U.S. stockholders (as defined below) whose functional currency is not the U.S. dollar, persons who mark-to-market our shares and persons who hold our shares as part of a “straddle,” “hedge” or “conversion” transaction. This summary assumes that investors hold shares of our common stock as capital assets (within the meaning of the Code).

The discussion is based upon the Code, Treasury regulations, and administrative and judicial interpretations, each as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and all of which are subject to change, possibly retroactively, which could affect the continuing validity of this discussion. This summary does not discuss any aspects of U.S. estate or gift tax or foreign, state or local tax. It does not discuss the special treatment under U.S. federal income tax laws that could result if we invested in tax-exempt securities or certain other investment assets.26For purposes of our discussion, a “U.S. stockholder” means a beneficial owner of shares of our common stock that is for U.S. federal income tax purposes:•a citizen or individual resident of the United States;•a corporation, or other entity treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, created or organized in or under the laws of the United States or any state thereof or the District of Columbia;•an estate, the income of which is subject to U.S. federal income taxation regardless of its source; or•a trust if (i) a U.S. court is able to exercise primary supervision over the administration of such trust and one or more U.S. persons have the authority to control all substantial decisions of the trust or (ii) it has a valid election in place to be treated as a U.S. person.For purposes of our discussion, a “Non-U.S. stockholder” means a beneficial owner of shares of our common stock that is neither a U.S. stockholder nor a partnership (including an entity treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes).If an entity treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes (a “partnership”) holds shares of our common stock, the tax treatment of a partner or member of the partnership will generally depend upon the status of the partner or member and the activities of the partnership. A prospective stockholder that is a partner or member in a partnership holding shares of our common stock should consult his, her or its tax advisors with respect to the purchase, ownership and disposition of shares of our common stock.Tax matters are very complicated and the tax consequences to an investor of an investment in our shares will depend on the facts of his, her or its particular situation. We encourage investors to consult their own tax advisors regarding the specific consequences of such an investment, including tax reporting requirements, the applicability of U.S. federal, state, local and foreign tax laws, eligibility for the benefits of any applicable tax treaty and the effect of any changes in the tax laws.Election to be Taxed as a RICWe have qualified and elected to be treated as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code commencing with our taxable year ended December 31, 2007. As a RIC, we generally are not subject to corporate-level U.S. federal income taxes on any income that we distribute to our stockholders from our tax earnings and profits. To qualify as a RIC, we must, among other things, meet certain source-of-income and asset diversification requirements (as described below). In addition, in order to obtain RIC tax treatment, we must distribute to our stockholders, for each taxable year, at least 90% of our “investment company taxable income” (“ICTI”), which is generally our net ordinary income plus the excess, if any, of realized net short-term capital gain over realized net long-term capital loss (the “Annual Distribution Requirement”). Even if we qualify for tax treatment as a RIC, we generally will be subject to corporate-level U.S. federal income tax on our undistributed taxable income and could be subject to U.S. federal excise, state, local and foreign taxes.Taxation as a RICProvided that we qualify for tax treatment as a RIC, we will not be subject to U.S. federal income tax on the portion of our ICTI and net capital gain (which we define as net long-term capital gain in excess of net short-term capital loss) that we timely distribute to stockholders. We will be subject to U.S. federal income tax at the regular corporate rates on any income or capital gain not distributed (or deemed distributed) to our stockholders.We will be subject to a 4% nondeductible U.S. federal excise tax on certain undistributed income unless we distribute in a timely manner an amount at least equal to the sum of (i) 98.0% of our ordinary income for each calendar year, (ii) 98.2% of our capital gain net income for the calendar year and (iii) any income recognized, but not distributed, in preceding years and on which we paid no U.S. federal income tax.27In order to qualify for tax treatment as a RIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we must, among other things:•meet the Annual Distribution Requirement;•qualify to be treated as a BDC or be registered as a management investment company under the 1940 Act at all times during each taxable year;•derive in each taxable year at least 90% of our gross income from dividends, interest, payments with respect to certain securities loans, gains from the sale or other disposition of stock or other securities or foreign currencies or other income derived with respect to our business of investing in such stock, securities or currencies and net income derived from an interest in a “qualified publicly traded partnership” (as defined in the Code), or the 90% Income Test; and•diversify our holdings so that at the end of each quarter of the taxable year:◦at least 50% of the value of our assets consists of cash, cash equivalents, U.S. Government securities, securities of other RICs, and other securities if such other securities of any one issuer do not represent more than 5% of the value of our assets or more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of the issuer (which for these purposes includes the equity securities of a “qualified publicly traded partnership”); and◦no more than 25% of the value of our assets is invested in the securities, other than U.S. Government securities or securities of other RICs, (i) of one issuer (ii) of two or more issuers that are controlled, as determined under applicable tax rules, by us and that are engaged in the same or similar or related trades or businesses or (iii) of one or more “qualified publicly traded partnerships,” or the Diversification Tests.To the extent that we invest in entities treated as partnerships for U.S. federal income tax purposes (other than a “qualified publicly traded partnership”), we generally must include the items of gross income derived by the partnerships for purposes of the 90% Income Test, and the income that is derived from a partnership (other than a “qualified publicly traded partnership”) will be treated as qualifying income for purposes of the 90% Income Test only to the extent that such income is attributable to items of income of the partnership which would be qualifying income if realized by us directly. In addition, we generally must take into account our proportionate share of the assets held by partnerships (other than a “qualified publicly traded partnership”) in which we are a partner for purposes of the Diversification Tests.In order to meet the 90% Income Test, we utilize the Taxable Subsidiaries, and in the future may establish additional such corporations, to hold assets from which we do not anticipate earning dividend, interest or other qualifying income under the 90% Income Test. Any investments held through the Taxable Subsidiaries generally are subject to U.S. federal income and other taxes, and therefore we can expect to achieve a reduced after-tax yield on such investments.We may be required to recognize taxable income in circumstances in which we do not receive a corresponding payment in cash. For example, if we hold debt obligations that are treated under applicable tax rules as having original issue discount (such as debt instruments with PIK interest or, in certain cases, increasing interest rates or issued with warrants), we must include in income each year a portion of the original issue discount that accrues over the life of the obligation, regardless of whether cash representing such income is received by us in the same taxable year. We may also have to include in income other amounts that we have not yet received in cash, such as deferred loan origination fees that are paid after origination of the loan or are paid in non-cash compensation such as warrants or stock. We anticipate that a portion of our income may constitute original issue discount or other income required to be included in taxable income prior to receipt of cash.Because any original issue discount or other amounts accrued will be included in our ICTI for the year of the accrual, we may be required to make a distribution to our stockholders in order to satisfy the Annual Distribution Requirement and to avoid the 4.0% U.S. federal excise tax, even though we will not have received any corresponding cash amount. As a result, we may have difficulty meeting the Annual Distribution Requirement necessary to obtain and maintain RIC tax treatment under the Code. We may have to sell some of our investments at 28times and/or at prices we would not consider advantageous, raise additional debt or equity capital or forgo new investment opportunities for this purpose. If we are not able to obtain cash from other sources, we may fail to qualify for RIC tax treatment and thus become subject to corporate-level income tax.Furthermore, a portfolio company in which we invest may face financial difficulty that requires us to work-out, modify or otherwise restructure our investment in the portfolio company. Any such restructuring may result in unusable capital losses and future non-cash income. Any restructuring may also result in our recognition of a substantial amount of non-qualifying income for purposes of the 90% Income Test, such as cancellation of indebtedness income in connection with the work-out of a leveraged investment (which, while not free from doubt, may be treated as non-qualifying income) or the receipt of other non-qualifying income.Gain or loss realized by us from warrants acquired by us, as well as any loss attributable to the lapse of such warrants generally will be treated as capital gain or loss. Such gain or loss generally will be long-term or short-term, depending on how long we held a particular warrant.Investments by us in non-U.S. securities may be subject to non-U.S. income, withholding and other taxes, and therefore, our yield on any such securities may be reduced by such non-U.S. taxes. Stockholders will generally not be entitled to claim a credit or deduction with respect to non-U.S. taxes paid by us.If we purchase shares in a “passive foreign investment company,” or PFIC, we may be subject to U.S. federal income tax on a portion of any “excess distribution” or gain from the disposition of such shares even if such income is distributed as a taxable dividend by us to our stockholders. Additional charges in the nature of interest may be imposed on us in respect of deferred taxes arising from such distributions or gains. If we invest in a PFIC and elect to treat the PFIC as a “qualified electing fund” under the Code, or QEF, in lieu of the foregoing requirements, we will be required to include in income each year a portion of the ordinary earnings and net capital gain of the QEF, even if such income is not distributed to it. Alternatively, we can elect to mark-to-market at the end of each taxable year our shares in a PFIC; in this case, we will recognize as ordinary income any increase in the value of such shares and as ordinary loss any decrease in such value to the extent it does not exceed prior increases included in income. Under either election, we may be required to recognize in a year income in excess of our distributions from PFICs and our proceeds from dispositions of PFIC stock during that year, and such income will nevertheless be subject to the Annual Distribution Requirement and will be taken into account for purposes of the 4% U.S. federal excise tax. Under Section 988 of the Code, gain or loss attributable to fluctuations in exchange rates between the time we accrue income, expenses, or other liabilities denominated in a foreign currency and the time we actually collect such income or pay such expenses or liabilities are generally treated as ordinary income or loss. Similarly, gain or loss on foreign currency forward contracts and the disposition of debt denominated in a foreign currency, to the extent attributable to fluctuations in exchange rates between the acquisition and disposition dates, are also treated as ordinary income or loss.We are authorized to borrow funds and to sell assets in order to satisfy distribution requirements. Under the 1940 Act, we are not permitted to make distributions to our stockholders while our debt obligations and other senior securities are outstanding unless certain “asset coverage” tests are met. See “Regulation of Business Development Companies — Qualifying Assets” and “Regulation of Business Development Companies — Senior Securities” above. Moreover, our ability to dispose of assets to meet our distribution requirements may be limited by (i) the illiquid nature of our portfolio and/or (ii) other requirements relating to our tax treatment as a RIC, including the Diversification Tests. If we dispose of assets in order to meet the Annual Distribution Requirement or to avoid the excise tax, we may make such dispositions at times that, from an investment standpoint, are not advantageous.If we fail to satisfy the Annual Distribution Requirement or otherwise fail to qualify for tax treatment as a RIC in any taxable year, we will be subject to tax in that year on all of our taxable income, regardless of whether we make any distributions to our stockholders. In that case, all of such income will be subject to corporate-level U.S. federal income tax, reducing the amount available to be distributed to our stockholders. See “Failure To Obtain RIC Tax Treatment” below.As a RIC, we are not allowed to carry forward or carry back a net operating loss for purposes of computing our ICTI in other taxable years. U.S. federal income tax law generally permits a RIC to carry forward (i) the excess of its 29net short-term capital loss over its net long-term capital gain for a given year as a short-term capital loss arising on the first day of the following year and (ii) the excess of its net long-term capital loss over its net short-term capital gain for a given year as a long-term capital loss arising on the first day of the following year. Future transactions we engage in may cause our ability to use any capital loss carryforwards, and unrealized losses once realized, to be limited under Section 382 of the Code. Certain of our investment practices may be subject to special and complex U.S. federal income tax provisions that may, among other things, (i) disallow, suspend or otherwise limit the allowance of certain losses or deductions, (ii) convert lower taxed long-term capital gain and qualified dividend income into higher taxed short-term capital gain or ordinary income, (iii) convert an ordinary loss or a deduction into a capital loss (the deductibility of which is more limited), (iv) cause us to recognize income or gain without a corresponding receipt of cash, (v) adversely affect the time as to when a purchase or sale of stock or securities is deemed to occur, (vi) adversely alter the characterization of certain complex financial transactions and (vii) produce income that will not be qualifying income for purposes of the 90% Income Test. We will monitor our transactions and may make certain tax elections in order to mitigate the effect of these provisions.As described above, to the extent that we invest in equity securities of entities that are treated as partnerships for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the effect of such investments for purposes of the 90% Income Test and the Diversification Tests will depend on whether or not the partnership is a “qualified publicly traded partnership” (as defined in the Code). If the entity is a “qualified publicly traded partnership,” the net income derived from such investments will be qualifying income for purposes of the 90% Income Test and will be “securities” for purposes of the Diversification Tests. However, if the entity is not treated as a “qualified publicly traded partnership,” the consequences of an investment in the partnership will depend upon the amount and type of income and assets of the partnership allocable to us. If the entity is not treated as a “qualified publicly traded partnership,” however, the consequences of an investment in the partnership will depend upon the amount and type of income and assets of the partnership allocable to us. The income derived from such investments may not be qualifying income for purposes of the 90% Income Test and, therefore, could adversely affect our tax treatment as a RIC. We intend to monitor our investments in equity securities of entities that are treated as partnerships for U.S. federal income tax purposes to prevent our disqualification from tax treatment as a RIC.We may invest in preferred securities or other securities the U.S. federal income tax treatment of which may not be clear or may be subject to recharacterization by the IRS. To the extent the tax treatment of such securities or the income from such securities differs from the expected tax treatment, it could affect the timing or character of income recognized, requiring us to purchase or sell securities, or otherwise change our portfolio, in order to comply with the tax rules applicable to RICs under the Code.We may distribute taxable dividends that are payable in cash or shares of our common stock at the election of each stockholder. Under certain applicable provisions of the Code and the Treasury regulations, distributions payable in cash or in shares of stock at the election of stockholders are treated as taxable dividends. The Internal Revenue Service has published guidance indicating that this rule will apply even where the total amount of cash that may be distributed is limited to no more than 20% of the total distribution (10% in case of distributions through June 30, 2022). Under this guidance, if too many stockholders elect to receive their distributions in cash, the cash available for distribution must be allocated among the stockholders electing to receive cash (with the balance of the distribution paid in stock). If we decide to make any distributions consistent with this guidance that are payable in part in our stock, taxable stockholders receiving such dividends will be required to include the full amount of the dividend (whether received in cash, our stock, or a combination thereof) as ordinary income (or as long-term capital gain to the extent such distribution is properly reported as a capital gain dividend) to the extent of our current and accumulated earnings and profits for U.S. federal income tax purposes. As a result, a U.S. stockholder may be required to pay tax with respect to such dividends in excess of any cash received. If a U.S. stockholder sells the stock it receives in order to pay this tax, the sales proceeds may be less than the amount included in income with respect to the dividend, depending on the market price of our stock at the time of the sale. Furthermore, with respect to non-U.S. stockholders, we may be required to withhold U.S. tax with respect to such dividends, including in respect of all or a portion of such dividend that is payable in stock. In addition, if a significant number of our stockholders determine to sell shares of our stock in order to pay taxes owed on dividends, it may put downward pressure on the trading price of our stock.30Failure to Obtain RIC Tax TreatmentIf we fail to satisfy the 90% Income Test or the Diversification Tests for any taxable year, we may nevertheless continue to qualify for tax treatment as a RIC for such year if certain relief provisions are applicable (which may, among other things, require us to pay certain corporate-level federal taxes or to dispose of certain assets).If we were unable to obtain tax treatment as a RIC, we would be subject to tax on all of our taxable income at regular corporate rates. We would not be able to deduct distributions to stockholders, nor would they be required to be made. Distributions would generally be taxable to our stockholders as dividend income to the extent of our current and accumulated earnings and profits (in the case of non-corporate U.S. stockholders, generally at a maximum U.S. federal income tax rate applicable to qualified dividend income of 20%). Subject to certain limitations under the Code, corporate distributees would be eligible for the dividends-received deduction. Distributions in excess of our current and accumulated earnings and profits would be treated first as a return of capital to the extent of the stockholder’s tax basis, and any remaining distributions would be treated as a capital gain.If we fail to meet the RIC requirements for more than two consecutive years and then, seek to re-qualify for tax treatment as a RIC, we would be subject to corporate-level taxation on any built-in gain recognized during the succeeding five-year period unless we made a special election to recognize all such built-in gain upon our re-qualification for tax treatment as a RIC and to pay the corporate-level tax on such built-in gain.Possible Legislative or Other Actions Affecting Tax ConsiderationsProspective investors should recognize that the present U.S. federal income tax treatment of an investment in our stock may be modified by legislative, judicial or administrative action at any time, and that any such action may affect investments and commitments previously made. The rules dealing with U.S. federal income taxation are constantly under review by persons involved in the legislative process and by the IRS and the U.S. Treasury Department, resulting in revisions of regulations and revised interpretations of established concepts as well as statutory changes. Revisions in U.S. federal tax laws and interpretations thereof could affect the tax consequences of an investment in our stock.

See “Risk Factors — Risk Relating to Our Business and Structure — We cannot predict how tax reform legislation will affect us, our investments, or our stockholders, and any such legislation could adversely affect our business” included in Item 1A of Part I of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.WithholdingOur distributions generally will be treated as dividends for U.S. tax purposes and will be subject to U.S. income or withholding tax unless the stockholder receiving the dividend qualifies for an exemption from U. income or withholding tax unless the shareholder receiving the dividend qualifies for an exemption from U. S. tax or the distribution is subject to one of the special look-through rules described below. Distributions paid out of net capital gains can qualify for a reduced rate of taxation in the hands of an individual U.S. stockholder and an exemption from U. shareholder and an exemption from U. S. tax in the hands of a non-U.S. stockholder. Under an exemption, properly reported dividend distributions by RICs paid out of certain interest income (such distributions, “interest-related dividends”) are generally exempt from U.S. withholding tax for non-U.S. stockholders. Under such exemption, a non-U.S. stockholder generally may receive interest-related dividends free of U. shareholder generally may receive interest-related dividends free of U. S. withholding tax if such stockholder would not have been subject to U. withholding tax if the shareholder would not have been subject to U. S. withholding tax if it had received the underlying interest income directly. No assurance can be given as to whether any of our distributions will be eligible for this exemption from U.S. withholding tax or, if eligible, will be reported as such by us. In particular, the exemption does not apply to distributions paid in respect of a RIC’s non-U. In particular, the exemption does apply to distributions paid in respect of a RIC’s non-U. S. source interest income, its dividend income or its foreign currency gains. In the case shares of our stock are held through an intermediary, the intermediary may withhold U.S. federal income tax even if we report the payment as a dividend eligible for the exemption.31State and Local Tax TreatmentThe state and local tax treatment may differ from U.S. federal income tax treatment.The discussion set forth herein does not constitute tax advice, and potential investors should consult their own tax advisors concerning the tax considerations relevant to their particular situation.

Available InformationWe intend to make this Annual Report on Form 10-K, as well as our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, our current reports on Form 8-K and, if applicable, amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act, publicly available on our website (www.baringsbdc.com) without charge as soon as reasonably practicable following our filing of such reports with the SEC. Our SEC reports can be accessed through the investor relations section of our website. The information found on our website is not part of this or any other report we file with or furnish to the SEC.

We assume no obligation to update or revise any statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K or in other reports filed with the SEC, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, unless we are required to do so by law.

A copy of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and our other reports is available without charge upon written request to Investor Relations, Barings BDC, Inc., 300 South Tryon Street, Suite 2500 Charlotte, North Carolina 28202. The SEC maintains an Internet site at www.sec.gov that contains our periodic and current reports, proxy and information statements and our other filings.32Item 1A.Item 1A. Risk Factors.Investing in our securities involves a number of significant risks.

In addition to the other information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, you should consider carefully the following information before making an investment in our securities. The risks set out below are not the only risks we face. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or not presently deemed material by us might also impair our operations and performance. If any of the following events occur, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. In such case, our NAV, the trading price of our common stock and the value of our other securities could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment. In such case, our net asset value, the trading price of our common stock and the value of our other securities could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment. The following is a summary of the principal risk factors associated with an investment in our securities. Further details regarding each risk included in the below summary list can be found further below.•We are dependent upon Barings’ access to its investment professionals for our success.•Our investment portfolio is and will continue to be recorded at fair value as determined in accordance with the Adviser’s valuation policies and procedures and, as a result, there is and will continue to be uncertainty as to the value of our portfolio investments.•Our investment portfolio is and will continue to be recorded at fair value as determined in good faith by our Board of Directors and, as a result, there is and will continue to be uncertainty as to the value of our portfolio investments. •We operate in a highly competitive market for investment opportunities, which could reduce returns and result in losses. •There are potential conflicts of interest, including the management of other investment funds and accounts by Barings, which could impact our investment returns.•The fee structure under the Barings BDC Advisory Agreement may induce Barings to pursue speculative investments and incur leverage, which may not be in the best interests of our stockholders.•The fee structure under the Amended and Restated Advisory Agreement may induce Barings to pursue speculative investments and incur leverage, which may not be in the best interests of our stockholders. •Regulations governing our operation as a BDC will affect our ability to, and the way in which we, raise additional capital.•Our financing agreements contain various covenants, which, if not complied with, could accelerate our repayment obligations thereunder, thereby materially and adversely affecting our liquidity, financial condition, results of operations and ability to pay distributions.•We are exposed to risks associated with changes in interest rates.•Inflation could adversely affect the business, results of operations, and financial condition of our portfolio companies.•Incurring additional leverage may magnify our exposure to risks associated with changes in leverage, including fluctuations in interest rates that could adversely affect our profitability.•Prepayments of our debt investments by our portfolio companies could adversely impact our results of operations and reduce our return on equity.•Our investments in portfolio companies may be risky, and we could lose all or part of our investment.•Shares of closed-end investment companies, including BDCs, frequently trade at a discount to their NAV, and may trade at premiums that may prove to be unsustainable.•Shares of closed-end investment companies, including BDCs, frequently trade at a discount to their net asset value, and may trade at premiums that may prove to be unsustainable. Risks Relating to Our Business and StructureWe are dependent upon Barings’ access to its investment professionals for our success. We depend on the diligence, skill and network of business contacts of Barings’ investment professionals to source appropriate investments for us. We depend on members of Barings’ investment team to appropriately analyze our investments and the relevant investment committee to approve and monitor our portfolio investments. We depend on members of Barings’ investment team to appropriately analyze our investments and Barings’ investment committee to approve and monitor our portfolio investments. Barings’ investment teams evaluate, negotiate, structure, close and monitor our investments. Our future success depends on the continued availability of the members of Barings’ investment committee and the other investment professionals available to Barings. We do not have employment agreements with these individuals or other key personnel of Barings, and we cannot provide any assurance that unforeseen business, medical, personal or other circumstances would not lead any such individual to terminate his or her relationship with Barings. If these individuals do not 33maintain their existing relationships with Barings and its affiliates or do not develop new relationships with other sources of investment opportunities, we may not be able to identify appropriate replacements or grow our investment portfolio. The loss of any member of Barings’ investment committee or of other investment professionals of Barings and its affiliates may limit our ability to achieve our investment objectives and operate as we anticipate, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. The loss of any member of Barings’ investment committee or of other investment professionals of Barings and its affiliates would limit our ability to achieve our investment objectives and operate as we anticipate, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. Barings evaluates, negotiates, structures, closes and monitors our investments in accordance with the terms of the Barings BDC Advisory Agreement. We can offer no assurance, however, that the investment professionals of Barings will continue to provide investment advice to us or that we will continue to have access to Barings’ investment professionals or its information and deal flow. Further, there can be no assurance that Barings will replicate its own historical success, and we caution you that our investment returns could be substantially lower than the returns achieved by other funds managed by Barings.Our business model depends to a significant extent upon strong referral relationships, and our inability to maintain or develop these relationships, as well as the failure of these relationships to generate investment opportunities, could adversely affect our business.We depend upon Barings’ and its affiliates’ relationships with sponsors, and we intend to rely to a significant extent upon these relationships to provide us with potential investment opportunities. If Barings or its affiliates fail to maintain such relationships, or to develop new relationships with other sponsors or sources of investment opportunities, we will not be able to grow our investment portfolio. In addition, individuals with whom the principals of Barings have relationships are not obligated to provide us with investment opportunities, and, therefore, we can offer no assurance that these relationships will generate investment opportunities for us in the future. If these individuals do not maintain their existing relationships with Barings and its affiliates or do not develop new relationships with other sources of investment opportunities, we may not be able to identify appropriate replacements or grow our investment portfolio. Our financial condition and results of operations will depend on our ability to manage and deploy capital effectively. Our financial condition and results of operations will depend on our ability to manage and deploy capital effectively. Our ability to continue to achieve our investment objectives will depend on our ability to effectively manage and deploy our capital, which will depend, in turn, on Barings’ ability to continue to identify, evaluate, invest in and monitor companies that meet our investment criteria. We cannot assure you that we will continue to achieve our investment objectives.Accomplishing this result on a cost-effective basis will be largely a function of Barings’ handling of the investment process, their ability to provide competent, attentive and efficient services and our access to investments offering acceptable terms. In addition to monitoring the performance of our existing investments, Barings’ investment professionals may also be called upon to provide managerial assistance to our portfolio companies. These demands on their time may distract them or slow the rate of investment.Even if we are able to grow and build upon our investment operations in a manner commensurate with any capital made available to us as a result of our operating activities, financing activities and/or offerings of our securities, any failure to manage our growth effectively could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. The results of our operations will depend on many factors, including the availability of opportunities for investment, readily accessible short- and long-term funding alternatives in the financial markets and general economic conditions.

Furthermore, if we cannot successfully operate our business or implement our investment policies and strategies as described in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, it could negatively impact our ability to pay distributions and cause you to lose part or all of your investment.Our investment portfolio is and will continue to be recorded at fair value as determined in accordance with the Adviser’s valuation policies and procedures and, as a result, there is and will continue to be uncertainty as to the value of our portfolio investments.Our investment portfolio is and will continue to be recorded at fair value as determined in good faith by our Board of Directors and, as a result, there is and will continue to be uncertainty as to the value of our portfolio investments. Under the 1940 Act, we are required to carry our portfolio investments at market value or, if there is no readily available market value, at fair value as determined in good faith by the Board. The Board has designated Barings as valuation designee to perform our fair value determinations relating to the value of our assets for which market quotations are not readily available. 34Typically there is not a public market for the securities of the privately held middle-market companies in which we have invested and will generally continue to invest. The Adviser conducts the valuation of such investments, upon which the Company’s NAV is primarily based, in accordance with its valuation policy, as well as established and documented processes and methodologies for determining the fair values of portfolio company investments on a recurring (at least quarterly) basis in accordance with the 1940 Act and ASC Topic 820. Our current valuation policy and processes were established by the Adviser and have been approved by the Board. The Adviser has established a pricing committee that is, subject to the oversight of the Board, responsible for the approval, implementation and oversight of the processes and methodologies that relate to the pricing and valuation of assets held by us. The Adviser uses independent third-party providers to price the portfolio, but in the event an acceptable price cannot be obtained from an approved external source, the Adviser will utilize alternative methods in accordance with internal pricing procedures established by the Adviser's pricing committee. See “Item 1. See "Item 1.

Business – Valuation Process and Determination of Net Asset Value” included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for a detailed description of our valuation process.The determination of fair value and consequently, the amount of unrealized appreciation and depreciation in our portfolio, is to a certain degree subjective and dependent on the judgment of Barings. Certain factors that may be considered in determining the fair value of our investments include the nature and realizable value of any collateral, the portfolio company’s earnings and its ability to make payments on its indebtedness, the markets in which the portfolio company does business, comparison to comparable publicly-traded companies, discounted cash flows and other relevant factors. Because such valuations, and particularly valuations of private securities and private companies, are inherently uncertain, may fluctuate over short periods of time and may be based on estimates, our determinations of fair value may differ materially from the values that would have been used if a ready market for these securities existed. Due to this uncertainty, the Adviser’s fair value determinations may cause our NAV on a given date to materially understate or overstate the value that we may ultimately realize upon the sale or disposition of one or more of our investments. Due to this uncertainty, our fair value determinations may cause our net asset value on a given date to materially understate or overstate the value that we may ultimately realize upon the sale or disposition of one or more of our investments. As a result, investors purchasing our securities based on an overstated NAV would pay a higher price than the value of our investments might warrant. As a result, investors purchasing our securities based on an overstated net asset value would pay a higher price than the value of our investments might warrant. Conversely, investors selling shares during a period in which the NAV understates the value of our investments will receive a lower price for their shares than the value of our investments might warrant. Conversely, investors selling shares 36during a period in which the net asset value understates the value of our investments will receive a lower price for their shares than the value of our investments might warrant. We operate in a highly competitive market for investment opportunities, which could reduce returns and result in losses.A number of entities compete with us to make the types of investments that we make. We compete with public and private funds, commercial and investment banks, commercial financing companies and, to the extent they provide an alternative form of financing, private equity and hedge funds. Many of our competitors are substantially larger and some have considerably greater financial, technical and marketing resources than we do. For example, we believe some of our competitors may have access to funding sources that are not available to us. In addition, some of our competitors may have higher risk tolerances or different risk assessments, which could allow them to consider a wider variety of investments and establish more relationships than us. Furthermore, many of our competitors are not subject to the regulatory restrictions that the 1940 Act imposes on us as a BDC or the source of income, asset diversification and distribution requirements we must satisfy to maintain our qualification as a RIC. The competitive pressures we face may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. As a result of this competition, we may not be able to take advantage of attractive investment opportunities from time to time, and we may not be able to identify and make investments that are consistent with our investment objective.With respect to the investments we make, we do not seek to compete based primarily on the interest rates we offer, and we believe that some of our competitors may make loans with interest rates that will be lower than the rates we offer. In the secondary market for acquiring existing loans, we compete generally on the basis of pricing terms. With respect to all investments, we may lose some investment opportunities if we do not match our competitors’ pricing, terms and structure. However, if we match our competitors’ pricing, terms and structure, we may experience decreased net interest income, lower yields and increased risk of credit loss. 35There are potential conflicts of interest, including the management of other investment funds and accounts by Barings, which could impact our investment returns. Our executive officers and the members of Barings’ investment committee, as well as the other principals of Barings, manage other funds affiliated with Barings, including other closed-end investment companies. In addition, Barings’ investment team has responsibilities for managing U.S. and global middle-market debt investments for certain other investment funds and accounts. Accordingly, they have obligations to investors in those entities, the fulfillment of which may not be in the best interests of, or may be adverse to our and our stockholders’ interests. In addition, certain of the other funds and accounts managed by Barings may provide for higher management or incentive fees, greater expense reimbursements or overhead allocations, or permit Barings and its affiliates to receive higher origination and other transaction fees, all of which may contribute to this conflict of interest and create an incentive for Barings to favor such other funds or accounts. Although the professional staff of Barings will devote as much time to our management as appropriate to enable Barings to perform its duties in accordance with the Barings BDC Advisory Agreement, the investment professionals of Barings may have conflicts in allocating their time and services among us, on the one hand, and the other investment vehicles managed by Barings or one or more of its affiliates on the other hand. Although the professional staff of Barings will devote as much time to our management as appropriate to enable Barings to perform its duties in accordance with the Amended and Restated Advisory Agreement, the investment professionals of Barings may have conflicts in allocating their time and services among us, on the one hand, and the other investment vehicles managed by Barings or one or more of its affiliates on the other hand. Barings may face conflicts in allocating investment opportunities between us and affiliated investment vehicles that have overlapping investment objectives with ours. Although Barings will endeavor to allocate investment opportunities in a fair and equitable manner in accordance with its allocation policies and procedures, it is possible that, in the future, we may not be given the opportunity to participate in investments made by investment funds managed by Barings or an investment manager affiliated with Barings if such investment is prohibited by the 1940 Act, and there can be no assurance that we will be able to participate in all investment opportunities that are suitable to us.Conflicts may also arise because portfolio decisions regarding our portfolio may benefit Barings’ affiliates. Barings’ affiliates may pursue or enforce rights with respect to one of our portfolio companies on behalf of other funds or accounts managed by it, and those activities may have an adverse effect on us.Barings may exercise significant influence over us in connection with its ownership of our common stock.As of February 22, 2024, Barings, our external investment adviser, beneficially owns approximately 12.9% of our outstanding common stock. As a result, Barings may be able to significantly influence the outcome of matters submitted for stockholder action, including the election of directors, approval of significant corporate transactions, such as amendments to our governing documents, business combinations, consolidations and mergers. Barings has substantial influence on us and could exercise its influence in a manner that conflicts with the interests of other stockholders. The presence of a significant stockholder such as Barings may also have the effect of making it more difficult for a third party to acquire us or discourage a third party from seeking to acquire us.Barings, its investment committee, or its affiliates may, from time to time, possess material non-public information, limiting our investment discretion.Principals of Barings and its affiliates and members of Barings’ investment committee may serve as directors of, or in a similar capacity with, companies in which we invest, the securities of which are purchased or sold on our behalf. In the event that material nonpublic information is obtained with respect to such companies, or we become subject to trading restrictions under the internal trading policies of those companies or as a result of applicable law or regulations, we could be prohibited for a period of time from purchasing or selling the securities of such companies, and this prohibition may have an adverse effect on us.Our ability to enter into transactions with Barings and its affiliates is restricted. BDCs generally are prohibited under the 1940 Act from knowingly participating in certain transactions with their affiliates without the prior approval of their independent directors and, in some cases, of the SEC. Those transactions include purchases and sales, and so-called “joint” transactions, in which a BDC and one or more of its affiliates engage in certain types of profit-making activities. Any person that owns, directly or indirectly, 5.0% or more of a BDC’s outstanding voting securities will be considered an affiliate of the BDC for purposes of the 1940 36Act, and a BDC generally is prohibited from engaging in purchases or sales of assets or joint transactions with such affiliates, absent the prior approval of the BDC’s independent directors. Additionally, without the approval of the SEC, a BDC is prohibited from engaging in purchases or sales of assets or joint transactions with the BDC’s officers and directors, and investment adviser, including funds managed by the investment adviser and its affiliates.BDCs may, however, invest alongside certain related parties or their respective other clients in certain circumstances where doing so is consistent with current law and SEC staff interpretations. For example, a BDC may invest alongside such accounts consistent with guidance promulgated by the SEC staff permitting the BDC and such other accounts to purchase interests in a single class of privately placed securities so long as certain conditions are met, including that the BDC’s investment adviser, acting on the BDC’s behalf and on behalf of other clients, negotiates no term other than price. The 1940 Act generally prohibits BDCs from making certain negotiated co-investments with certain affiliates absent an order from the SEC permitting the BDC to do so. Pursuant to the Exemptive Relief, we are generally permitted to co-invest with funds affiliated with Barings if a “required majority” (as defined in Section 57(o) of the 1940 Act) of our independent directors make certain conclusions in connection with a co-investment transaction, including that (1) the terms of the transaction, including the consideration to be paid, are reasonable and fair to us and our stockholders and do not involve overreaching in respect of us or our stockholders on the part of any person concerned and (2) the transaction is consistent with the interests of our stockholders and is consistent with our investment objective and strategies. Co-investments made under the Exemptive Relief are subject to compliance with the conditions and other requirements contained in the Exemptive Relief, which could limit our ability to participate in a co-investment transaction.In situations where co-investment with other affiliated funds or accounts is not permitted or appropriate, Barings will need to decide which account will proceed with the investment in accordance with its allocation policies and procedures. Although Barings will endeavor to allocate investment opportunities in a fair and equitable manner in accordance with its allocation policies and procedures, it is possible that, in the future, we may not be given the opportunity to participate in investments made by investment funds managed by Barings or an investment manager affiliated with Barings if such investment is prohibited by the 1940 Act. These restrictions, and similar restrictions that limit our ability to transact business with our officers or directors or their affiliates, including funds managed by Barings, may limit the scope of investment opportunities that would otherwise be available to us.We are subject to risks associated with investing alongside other third parties.We are subject to risks associated with investing alongside other third parties, including our joint ventures. We have invested and may in the future invest alongside third parties through partnerships, joint ventures or other entities. Such investments may involve risks not present in investments where a third party is not involved, including the possibility that such third party may at any time have economic or business interests or goals which are inconsistent with ours, or may be in a position to take action contrary to our investment objectives. In addition, we may in certain circumstances be liable for actions of such third party. More specifically, joint ventures involve a third party that has approval rights over certain activities of the joint venture. The third party may take actions that are inconsistent with our interests. For example, the third party may decline to approve an investment for the joint venture that we otherwise want the joint venture to make. A joint venture may also use investment leverage which magnifies the potential for gain or loss on amounts invested. Generally, the amount of borrowings by the joint venture is not included when calculating our total borrowings and related leverage ratios and is not subject to asset coverage requirements imposed by the 1940 Act. If the activities of the joint venture were required to be consolidated with our activities because of a change in U. If the activities of the joint venture were required to be consolidated with our activities because of a change in GAAP rules or SEC staff interpretations, it is likely that we would have to reorganize any such joint venture. S. GAAP rules or SEC staff interpretations, it is likely that we would have to reorganize any such joint venture.The fee structure under the Barings BDC Advisory Agreement may induce Barings to pursue speculative investments and incur leverage, which may not be in the best interests of our stockholders.The fee structure under the Amended and Restated Advisory Agreement may induce Barings to pursue speculative investments and incur leverage, which may not be in the best interests of our stockholders. Under the Barings BDC Advisory Agreement, the base management fee will be payable even if the value of your investment declines. Under the Amended and Restated Advisory Agreement, the base management fee will be payable even if the value of your investment declines. The base management fee is calculated based on our gross assets, including assets purchased with borrowed funds or other forms of leverage (but excluding cash or cash equivalents ). Accordingly, the base management fee is payable regardless of whether the value of our gross assets and/or your investment has 37decreased during the then-current quarter and creates an incentive for Barings to incur leverage, which may not be consistent with our stockholders’ interests.The income-based fee payable to Barings is calculated based on a percentage of our return on invested capital. The income-based fee payable to Barings may create an incentive for Barings to make investments on our behalf that are risky or more speculative than would be the case in the absence of such a compensation arrangement. Unlike the base management fee, the income-based fee is payable only if the hurdle rate is achieved. Because the portfolio earns investment income on gross assets while the hurdle rate is based on invested capital, and because the use of leverage increases gross assets without any corresponding increase in invested capital, Barings may be incentivized to incur leverage to grow the portfolio, which will tend to enhance returns where our portfolio has positive returns and increase the chances that such hurdle rate is achieved. Conversely, the use of leverage may increase losses where our portfolio has negative returns, which would impair the value of our common stock. In addition, Barings receives the capital gains fee based, in part, upon net capital gains realized on our investments. Unlike the income-based fee, there is no hurdle rate applicable to the capital gains fee. As a result, Barings may have a tendency to invest more capital in investments that are likely to result in capital gains as compared to income producing securities. Such a practice could result in our investing in more speculative securities than would otherwise be the case, which may not be in the best interests of our stockholders and could result in higher investment losses, particularly during economic downturns.Barings’ liability is limited under the Barings BDC Advisory Agreement, and we are required to indemnify Barings against certain liabilities, which may lead Barings to act in a riskier manner on our behalf than it would when acting for its own account.Barings' liability is limited under the Amended and Restated Advisory Agreement, and we are required to indemnify Barings against certain liabilities, which may lead Barings to act in a riskier manner on our behalf than it would when acting for its own account. Pursuant to the Barings BDC Advisory Agreement, Barings and its officers, managers, partners, agents, employees, controlling persons, members and any other person or entity affiliated with Barings will not be liable to us, and we have agreed to indemnify them, for their acts under the Barings BDC Advisory Agreement, absent fraud, willful misfeasance, bad faith, gross negligence or reckless disregard in the performance of their duties. Pursuant to the Amended and Restated Advisory Agreement, Barings and its officers, managers, partners, agents, employees, controlling persons, members and any other person or entity affiliated with Barings will not be liable to us, and we have agree to indemnify them, for their acts under the Amended and Restated Advisory Agreement, absent fraud, willful misfeasance, bad faith, gross negligence or reckless disregard in the performance of 39their duties. These protections may lead Barings to act in a riskier manner when acting on our behalf than it would when acting for its own account.Barings is able to resign as our investment adviser and/or our administrator upon 60 days’ notice, and we may not be able to find a suitable replacement within that time, or at all, resulting in a disruption in our operations that could adversely affect our financial condition, business and results of operations. Pursuant to the Barings BDC Advisory Agreement, Barings has the right to resign as our investment adviser upon 60 days’ written notice, whether a replacement has been found or not. Pursuant to the Amended and Restated Advisory Agreement, Barings has the right to resign as our investment adviser upon 60 days' written notice, whether a replacement has been found or not. Similarly, Barings has the right under the Administration Agreement to resign upon 60 days’ written notice, whether a replacement has been found or not. If Barings resigns, it may be difficult to find a replacement investment adviser or administrator, as applicable, or hire internal management with similar expertise and ability to provide the same or equivalent services on acceptable terms within 60 days, or at all. If a replacement is not found quickly, our business, results of operations and financial condition as well as our ability to pay distributions are likely to be adversely affected and the value of our shares may decline. In addition, the coordination of our internal management and investment or administrative activities is likely to suffer if we are unable to identify and reach an agreement with a single institution or group of executives having the expertise possessed by Barings. Even if a comparable service provider or individuals performing such services are retained, whether internal or external, their integration into our business and lack of familiarity with our investment objective may result in additional costs and time delays that may materially adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.38Our long-term ability to fund new investments and make distributions to our stockholders could be limited if we are unable to renew, extend, replace or expand our current borrowing arrangements, or if financing becomes more expensive or less available.There can be no guarantee that we will be able to renew, extend, replace or expand our current borrowing arrangements on terms that are favorable to us, if at all. Our ability to obtain replacement financing will be constrained by then-current economic conditions affecting the credit markets. Our inability to renew, extend, replace or expand these borrowing arrangements could have a material adverse effect on our liquidity and ability to fund new investments, our ability to make distributions to our stockholders and our ability to qualify for tax treatment as a RIC under the Code.We may be subject to PIK interest payments.Certain of our debt investments may contain provisions providing for the payment of PIK interest. Because PIK interest results in an increase in the size of the loan balance of the underlying loan, the receipt by us of PIK interest will have the effect of increasing our assets under management. As a result, because the base management fee that we pay to the Investment Adviser is based on the value of our gross assets, the receipt by us of PIK interest will result in an increase in the amount of the base management fee payable by us. In addition, any such increase in a loan balance due to the receipt of PIK interest will cause such loan to accrue interest on the higher loan balance, which will result in an increase in our pre-incentive fee net investment income and, as a result, an increase in incentive fees that are payable by us to the Investment Adviser.To the extent original issue discount instruments, such as zero coupon bonds and PIK loans, constitute a significant portion of the Company’s income, investors will be exposed to typical risks associated with such income being required to be included in taxable and accounting income prior to receipt of cash, including the following: (a) the higher interest rates of PIK loans reflect the payment deferral and increased credit risk associated with these instruments, and PIK instruments generally represent a significantly higher credit risk than coupon loans; (b) PIK loans may have unreliable valuations because their continuing accruals require continuing judgments about the collectability of the deferred payments and the value of any associated collateral; (c) market prices of zero-coupon or PIK securities are affected to a greater extent by interest rate changes and may be more volatile than securities that pay interest periodically and in cash, and PIKs are usually less volatile than zero-coupon bonds, but more volatile than cash pay securities; (d) because original issue discount income is accrued without any cash being received by the Company, required cash distributions may have to be paid from offering proceeds or the sale of Company assets without investors being given any notice of this fact; (e) the deferral of PIK interest increases the loan-to-value ratio, which is a measure of the riskiness of a loan; (f) even if the accounting conditions for income accrual are met, the borrower could still default when the Company’s actual payment is due at the maturity of the loan; and (g) original issue discount creates risk of non-refundable cash payments to our Investment Adviser based on non-cash accruals that may never be realized.Regulations governing our operation as a BDC will affect our ability to, and the way in which we, raise additional capital.Our business requires capital to operate and grow.Our business will require capital to operate and grow. In the future, we may issue debt securities or preferred stock, and/or borrow money from banks or other financial institutions, which we refer to collectively as “senior securities.” As a result of issuing senior securities, we will be exposed to additional risks, including, but not limited to, the following:•Under the provisions of the 1940 Act, we are permitted, as a BDC, to issue senior securities only in amounts such that our asset coverage, as defined in the 1940 Act, equals at least 150% after each issuance of senior securities. If the value of our assets declines, we may be unable to satisfy this test. If that happens, we may be prohibited from declaring a dividend or making any distribution to stockholders or repurchasing our shares until such time as we satisfy this test.•Any amounts that we use to service our debt or make payments on preferred stock will not be available for distributions to our common stockholders.39•Our current indebtedness is, and it is likely that any securities or other indebtedness we may issue will be, governed by an indenture or other instrument containing covenants restricting our operating flexibility. Additionally, some of these securities or other indebtedness may be rated by rating agencies, and in obtaining a rating for such securities and other indebtedness, we may be required to abide by operating and investment guidelines that further restrict operating and financial flexibility.•We and, indirectly, our stockholders, will bear the cost of issuing and servicing such securities and other indebtedness.•Preferred stock or any convertible or exchangeable securities that we issue in the future may have rights, preferences and privileges more favorable than those of our common stock, including separate voting rights and could delay or prevent a transaction or a change in control to the detriment of the holders of our common stock.Under the provisions of the 1940 Act, we are not generally able to issue and sell our common stock at a price below then-current NAV per share.Under the provisions of the 1940 Act, we are not generally able to issue and sell our common stock at a price below then-current net asset value per share. We may, however, sell our common stock or warrants, options or rights to acquire our common stock, at a price below the then-current NAV per share of our common stock if the Board determines that such sale is in the best interests of us and our stockholders, and our stockholders approve such sale. We may, however, sell our common stock or warrants, options or rights to acquire our common stock, at a price below the then-current net asset value per share of our common stock if the Board determines that such sale is in the best interests of us and our stockholders, and our stockholders approve such sale. We may also make rights offerings to our stockholders at prices per share less than the NAV per share, subject to applicable requirements of the 1940 Act. We may also make rights offerings to our stockholders at prices per share less than the net asset value per share, subject to applicable requirements of the 1940 Act. If we raise additional funds by issuing more common stock or senior securities convertible into, or exchangeable for, our common stock, the percentage ownership of our stockholders at that time would decrease, and they may experience dilution. Moreover, we can offer no assurance that we will be able to issue and sell additional equity securities in the future on favorable terms, or at all. We generally seek approval from our stockholders so that we have the flexibility to issue up to a specified percentage of our then-outstanding shares of our common stock at a price below NAV. Pursuant to approval granted at our annual meeting of stockholders held on May 4, 2023 we are permitted to issue and sell shares of our common stock at a price below our then-current NAV per share in one or more offerings, subject to certain limitations and determinations that must be made by the Board (including, without limitation, that the number of shares issued and sold pursuant to such authority does not exceed 30% of our then-outstanding common stock immediately prior to each such offering). Pursuant to approval granted at an annual meeting of stockholders held on May 20, 2021, we are permitted to issue and sell shares of our common stock at a price below our then-current net asset value per share in one or more offerings, subject to certain limitations and determinations that must be made by the Board (including, without limitation, that the number of shares issued and sold pursuant to such authority does not exceed 30% of our then-outstanding common stock immediately prior to each such offering). Such stockholder approval expires on May 4, 2024.Our financing agreements contain various covenants, which, if not complied with, could accelerate our repayment obligations thereunder, thereby materially and adversely affecting our liquidity, financial condition, results of operations and ability to pay distributions.We will have a continuing need for capital to finance our investments. We are party to various financing agreements from time to time which contain customary terms and conditions, including, without limitation, affirmative and negative covenants such as information reporting requirements, minimum stockholders' equity, minimum obligators’ net worth, minimum asset coverage, maximum net debt to equity, minimum liquidity and maintenance of RIC and BDC status. These financing arrangements also contain customary events of default with customary cure and notice provisions, including, without limitation, nonpayment, misrepresentation of representations and warranties in a material respect, breach of covenant, cross-default to other indebtedness, bankruptcy, change of control, and material adverse effect. Our continued compliance with the covenants under these financing agreements depends on many factors, some of which are beyond our control, and there can be no assurance that we will continue to comply with such covenants. Our failure to satisfy the respective covenants or otherwise default under one of our financing arrangements could result in foreclosure by the lenders thereunder, which would accelerate our repayment obligations under the financing arrangement and thereby have a material adverse effect on our business, liquidity, financial condition, results of operations and ability to pay distributions to our stockholders.40We are exposed to risks associated with changes in interest rates.To the extent we borrow money or issue debt securities or preferred stock to make investments, our net investment income will depend, in part, upon the difference between the rate at which we borrow funds or pay interest or dividends on such debt securities or preferred stock and the rate at which we invest these funds. Because we borrow money to make investments and may issue debt securities, preferred stock or other securities, our net investment income is dependent upon the difference between the rate at which we borrow funds or pay interest or dividends on such debt securities, preferred stock or other securities and the rate at which we invest these funds. The recent increases in the general level of interest rates have led to higher interest rates applicable to our debt investments, which have resulted in an increase of the amount of incentive fees payable to Barings. Also, the recent increases in interest rates available to investors could make an investment in our common stock less attractive if we are not able to increase our distribution rate, which could reduce the market price of our common stock.As of the end of June 2023, no settings of the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) continue to be published on a representative basis and publication of many non-U.S. dollar LIBOR settings has been entirely discontinued. On March 15, 2022, the U.S. enacted federal legislation that is intended to minimize legal and economic uncertainty following U.S. dollar LIBOR’s cessation by replacing LIBOR references in certain U.S. law-governed contracts under certain circumstances with a SOFR-based rate identified in a Federal Reserve rule plus a statutory spread adjustment. In addition, the U.K. Financial Conduct Authority, which regulates the publisher of LIBOR (ICE Benchmark Administration), has announced that it will require the continued publication of the one-, three- and six-month tenors of U.S. dollar LIBOR on a non-representative synthetic basis until the end of September 2024, which may result in certain non-U.S. law-governed contracts and U.S. law-governed contracts not covered by the federal legislation remaining on synthetic U.S. dollar LIBOR until the end of this period.Our loan agreements with our portfolio companies that referenced LIBOR included fallback language in the event that LIBOR was discontinued, became unrepresentative or in the event that the method for determining LIBOR has changed. As a result of this language or through other bi-lateral amendments, all of these loan agreements have transitioned to an alternative reference rate.The transition away from LIBOR and reform, modification, or adjustments of other reference rate benchmarks to alternative reference rates is complex and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations, including as a result of any changes in the pricing of our investments, changes to the documentation for certain of our investments and the pace of such changes, disputes and other actions regarding the interpretation of current and prospective loan documentation or modifications to processes and systems.Alteration of the terms of a debt instrument or a modification of the terms of other types of contracts to replace an interbank offered rate with a new reference rate could result in a taxable exchange and the realization of income and gain/loss for U.S. federal income tax purposes. The IRS has issued final regulations regarding the tax consequences of the transition from interbank offered rates to new reference rates in debt instruments and non-debt contracts. Under the final regulations, alteration or modification of the terms of a debt instrument to replace an operative rate that uses a discontinued interbank offered rate with a qualified rate (as defined in the final regulations), add a qualified rate as a fallback rate to a contract whose operative rate uses a discontinued interbank offered rate or replace a fallback rate that uses a discontinued interbank offered rate with a qualified rate would not be taxable. The IRS may provide additional guidance, with potential retroactive effect.Furthermore, because a rise in the general level of interest rates can be expected to lead to higher interest rates applicable to our debt investments, an increase in interest rates would make it easier for us to meet or exceed the incentive fee hurdle rate in the investment advisory agreement and may result in a substantial increase of the amount of incentive fees payable to Barings with respect to pre-incentive fee net investment income.41We may invest in derivatives or other assets that expose us to certain risks, including market risk, liquidity risk, and other risks similar to those associated with the use of leverage.We may invest in derivatives and other assets that are subject to many of the same types of risks related to the use of leverage. In October 2020, the SEC adopted Rule 18f-4 under the 1940 Act regarding the ability of a BDC to use derivatives and other transactions that create future payment or delivery obligations. Under Rule 18f-4, BDCs that use derivatives are subject to a value-at-risk leverage limit, a derivatives risk management program and testing requirements and requirements related to board reporting. These requirements apply unless the BDC qualifies as a “limited derivatives user,” as defined under Rule 18f-4. Under Rule 18f-4, a BDC may enter into an unfunded commitment agreement (which may include delayed draw and revolving loans) that will not be deemed to be a derivatives transaction, such as an agreement to provide financing to a portfolio company, if the BDC has, among other things, a reasonable belief, at the time it enters into such an agreement, that it will have sufficient cash and cash equivalents to meet its obligations with respect to all of its unfunded commitment agreements, in each case as it becomes due. Collectively, these requirements may limit our ability to use derivatives and/or enter into certain other financial contracts.We have adopted updated policies and procedures in compliance with Rule 18f-4. We expect to qualify as a “limited derivatives user” under Rule 18f-4. Future legislation or rules may modify how we treat derivatives and other financial arrangements for purposes of compliance with the leverage limitations of the 1940 Act. Future legislation or rules may modify how leverage is calculated under the 1940 Act and, therefore, may increase or decrease the amount of leverage currently available to us under the 1940 Act, which may be materially adverse to us and our stockholders.Incurring additional leverage may magnify our exposure to risks associated with changes in leverage, including fluctuations in interest rates that could adversely affect our profitability.As part of our business strategy, we borrow under financing agreements with certain banks and issue debt securities, and in the future may borrow money and issue debt securities to banks, insurance companies and other lenders.As part of our business strategy, we borrow under financing agreements with certain banks, and in the future may borrow money and issue debt securities to banks, insurance companies and other lenders. Our obligations under these arrangements are or may be secured by a material portion of our assets. As a result, these lenders are or may have claims that are superior to the claims of our common stockholders, and have or may have fixed-dollar claims on our assets that are superior to the claims of our stockholders. Also, if the value of our assets decreases, leverage will cause our NAV to decline more sharply than it otherwise would have without leverage. Also, if the value of our assets decreases, leverage will cause our net asset value to decline more sharply than it otherwise would have without leverage. Similarly, any decrease in our income would cause our net income to decline more sharply than it would have if we had not borrowed. This decline could negatively affect our ability to make dividend payments on our common stock.Because we incur leverage, general interest rate fluctuations may have a more significant negative impact on our investments than they would have absent such leverage and, accordingly, may have a material adverse effect on our operating results. A portion of our income will depend upon the difference between the rate at which we borrow funds and the interest rate on the debt securities in which we invest. Because we borrow money to make investments and may issue debt securities, preferred stock or other securities, our net investment income is dependent upon the difference between the rate at which we borrow funds or pay interest or dividends on such debt securities, preferred stock or other securities and the rate at which we invest these funds. Typically, our interest earning investments accrue and pay interest at variable rates, and our interest-bearing liabilities accrue interest at variable or potentially fixed rates. As a result, there can be no assurance that a significant change in market interest rates will not have a material adverse effect on our net investment income.The following table illustrates the effect of leverage on returns from an investment in our common stock assuming that we employ (i) our actual asset coverage ratio as of December 31, 2023 and (ii) a hypothetical asset coverage ratio of 150%, each at various annual returns on our portfolio as of December 31, 2023, net of expenses. The purpose of this table is to assist investors in understanding the effects of leverage. The calculations in the table below are hypothetical, and actual returns may be higher or lower than those appearing in the table below.42(1) Assumes $2,677.(1) Assumes $2,160. 5 million in total assets, $1,446.9 million in total assets, $1,407. 0 million in debt outstanding, $1,196.0 million in debt outstanding, $741. 6 million in net assets and an average cost of funds of 5.432%, which was the weighted average borrowing cost of our outstanding borrowings at December 31, 2023. The assumed amount of debt outstanding for this example includes $719.9 million of outstanding borrowings under our senior secured credit facility with ING Capital LLC initially entered into in February 2019 (as amended, restated and otherwise modified from time to time, the “February 2019 Credit Facility”) as of December 31, 2023, $50.

0 million aggregate principal amount of August 2025 Notes (as defined below under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources” included in Item 7 of Part II of this Annual Report on Form 10-K) outstanding, $175.

0 million aggregate principal amount of November Notes (as defined below under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources” included in Item 7 of Part II of this Annual Report on Form 10-K) outstanding, $150.

0 million aggregate principal amount of February Notes (as defined below under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources” included in Item 7 of Part II of this Annual Report on Form 10-K) outstanding, $350.

0 million aggregate principal amount of November 2026 Notes (as defined below under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Liquidity and Capital Resources” included in Item 7 of Part II of this Annual Report on Form 10-K) outstanding, and assumed additional borrowings of $1.1 million to settle our payable from unsettled transactions as of December 31, 2023. (2) Assumes $3,625. (2) Assumes $2,264. 7 million in total assets, $2,393.6 million in total assets, $1,483. 1 million in debt outstanding and $1,196.9 million in debt outstanding and $741. 6 million in net assets as of December 31, 2023, and an average cost of funds of 5.9 million in net assets as of December 31, 2021, and an average cost of funds of 3. 432%, which was the weighted average borrowing cost of our borrowings at December 31, 2023.Based on our total outstanding indebtedness of $1,444.9 million as of December 31, 2023, assumed additional borrowings of $1.2 million as of December 31, 2021, assumed additional borrowings of $26. 1 million to settle our payable from unsettled transactions as of December 31, 2023 and an average cost of funds of 5.8 million to settle our payable from unsettled transactions as of December 31, 2021 and an average cost of funds of 3. 432%, which was the weighted average borrowing cost of our outstanding borrowings at December 31, 2023, our investment portfolio must experience an annual return of at least 2.93% to cover annual interest payments on our outstanding indebtedness.Based on outstanding indebtedness of $2,393.Based on outstanding indebtedness of $1483. 1 million calculated assuming a 150% asset coverage ratio and an average cost of funds of 5.9 million calculated assuming a 150% asset coverage ratio and an average cost of funds of 3. 432%, which was the weighted average borrowing cost of our outstanding borrowings at December 31, 2023, our investment portfolio must experience an annual return of at least 3.59% to cover annual interest payments on our outstanding indebtedness. We may in the future determine to fund a portion of our investments with preferred stock, which would magnify the potential for gain or loss and the risks of investing in us in the same way as our borrowings.Preferred stock, which is another form of leverage, has the same risks to our common stockholders as borrowings because the dividends on any preferred stock we issue must be cumulative. Payment of such dividends and repayment of the liquidation preference of such preferred stock must take preference over any dividends or other payments to our common stockholders, and preferred stockholders are not subject to any of our expenses or losses and are not entitled to participate in any income or appreciation in excess of their stated preference.43Our Board of Directors may change our investment objectives, operating policies and strategies without prior notice or stockholder approval, the effects of which may be adverse.The Board has the authority to modify or waive our current investment objectives, operating policies and strategies without prior notice and without stockholder approval (except as required by the 1940 Act). However, absent stockholder approval, we may not change the nature of our business so as to cease to be, or withdraw our election as, a BDC. We cannot predict the effect any changes to our current operating policies, investment criteria and strategies would have on our business, NAV, operating results and value of our stock. We cannot predict the effect any changes to our current operating policies, investment criteria and strategies would have on our business, net asset value, operating results and value of our stock. However, the effects might be adverse, which could negatively impact our ability to pay you distributions and cause you to lose all or part of your investment. Moreover, we will have significant flexibility in investing the net proceeds from any future offering and may use the net proceeds from such offerings in ways with which investors may not agree or for purposes other than those contemplated at the time of the offering.We will be subject to corporate-level U.S. federal income tax if we are unable to maintain our tax treatment as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code, which will adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.We have elected to be treated as a RIC under the Code, which generally allows us to avoid being subject to corporate-level U.We have elected to be treated as a RIC under the Code, which generally will allow us to avoid being subject to corporate-level U. S. federal income tax. To maintain RIC tax treatment under the Code, we must meet the following annual distribution, income source and asset diversification requirements:•The Annual Distribution Requirement for a RIC will be satisfied if we distribute to our stockholders on an annual basis at least 90. To obtain and maintain RIC tax treatment under the Code, we must meet the following annual distribution, income source and asset diversification requirements:•The Annual Distribution Requirement for a RIC will be satisfied if we distribute to our stockholders on an annual basis at least 90. 0% of our net ordinary income and net short-term capital gain in excess of net long-term capital loss, or ICTI, if any. We will be subject to a 4.0% nondeductible U.S. federal excise tax, however, to the extent that we do not satisfy certain additional minimum distribution requirements on a calendar year basis. Because we use debt financing, we are subject to certain asset coverage ratio requirements under the 1940 Act and are currently, and may in the future become, subject to certain financial covenants under loan and credit agreements that could, under certain circumstances, restrict us from making distributions necessary to satisfy the Annual Distribution Requirement. If we are unable to obtain cash from other sources, we could fail to qualify for RIC tax treatment and thus become subject to corporate-level U.S. federal income tax.•The income source requirement will be satisfied if we obtain at least 90.0% of our income for each year from distributions, interest, gains from the sale of stock or securities or similar sources.•The asset diversification requirement will be satisfied if we meet certain asset diversification requirements at the end of each quarter of our taxable year. To satisfy this requirement, at least 50.0% of the value of our assets must consist of cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities, securities of other RICs, and other acceptable securities, provided such other securities of any one issuer do not represent more than 5% of the value of our assets or more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of the issuer; and no more than 25.0% of the value of our assets can be invested in the securities, other than U.S.