Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - SWBI

-New additions in green
-Changes in blue
-Hover to see similar sentence in last filing

$SWBI Risk Factor changes from 00/06/19/20/2020 to 00/06/17/21/2021

Item 1A. Risk Factors: The following summarizes material risks of purchasing or owning our common stock. Additional unknown risks may also impair our financial performance and business operations. Our business, financial condition, and operating results may be materially and adversely affected by the nature and impact of these risks. In such case, the market value of our common stock could be detrimentally affected, and investors may lose part or all of the value of their investment. You should carefully consider the risks and uncertainties described below. We have grouped these risk factors into the following general categories: • Risks relating to health, economic, social, political, legislative, and regulatory factors. 14 • Risks relating to manufacturing, raw materials and component supply, product development and performance, customer demand, and brand recognition. • Risks related to legal proceedings, product recalls, and other product liabilities. • Risks relating to intellectual property, information systems, and cybersecurity. • Risks relating to certain business matters and securities markets. • Risks relating to the spin-off of our outdoor products and accessories business. Risks Relating to Health, Economic, Social, Political, Legislative, and Regulatory Factors We are dependent on the proper functioning of our critical facilities, our supply chain, and distribution networks as well as the financial stability of our customers, all of which could be negatively impacted by the coronavirus, or COVID-19, in a manner that could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, or operating results. COVID-19 continues to impact worldwide economic activity. COVID-19 is impacting worldwide economic activity. The virus was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization in 2020. The impact of this pandemic has been, and will likely continue to be, extensive in many aspects of society, which has resulted in, and could continue to result in, significant disruptions to the global economy, as well as businesses and capital markets around the world. The impact of this pandemic has been, and will likely continue to be, extensive in many aspects of society, which has resulted in, and will likely continue to result in, significant disruptions to the global economy, as well as businesses and capital markets around the world. The facilities of certain of our contract manufacturers and other suppliers are subject to the same and additional risks, especially since some of them are located in Europe and India, where the pandemic remains a significant concern. At this point, the extent to which COVID-19 may impact our results is uncertain, but it could negatively impact our business. A reduction or interruption in any of our manufacturing processes could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition, and cash flows. The impact of COVID-19 on economic activity, and its effect on our manufacturing facility, supply chain, distribution networks, and our customers remains uncertain at this time and could have a material adverse effect on our results, especially to the extent these effects continue and/or increase in severity over an extended period of time. The impact of COVID-19 on economic activity, and its effect on our manufacturing facility, supply chain, distribution networks, and our customers is uncertain at this time and could have a material adverse effect on our results, especially to the extent these effects continue and/or increase in severity over an extended period of time. Our performance is influenced by a variety of economic, social, political, legislative, and regulatory factors. Our performance is influenced by a variety of economic, social, political, legislative, and regulatory factors. General economic conditions and consumer spending patterns can negatively impact our operating results. Economic uncertainty, unfavorable employment levels, declines in consumer confidence, increases in consumer debt levels, increased commodity prices, and other economic factors may affect consumer spending on discretionary items and adversely affect the demand for our products. Economic conditions also affect governmental, political, and budgetary policies. As a result, economic conditions also can have an effect on the sale of our products to law enforcement, government, and military customers. The impact of weak consumer credit markets, corporate restructurings, layoffs, high unemployment rates, declines in the value of investments and residential real estate, higher fuel prices, and increases in federal and state taxation can also negatively affect our results of operations. The underlying assumptions regarding the estimated useful lives of these intangible assets are reviewed annually and more often if an event or circumstance occurs making it likely that the carrying value of the assets may not be recoverable and are adjusted through accelerated amortization, if necessary. Social, political, and other factors also can affect our performance. Social, political, and other factors also can affect our performance. Concerns about presidential, congressional, and state elections and legislature and policy shifts resulting from those elections can affect the demand for our products. In addition, speculation surrounding increased gun control at the federal, state, and local level and heightened fears of terrorism and crime can affect consumer demand for our products. Often, such concerns result in an increase in near-term consumer demand and subsequent softening of demand when such concerns subside. Inventory levels in excess of customer demand may negatively impact operating results. Federal and state legislatures frequently consider legislation relating to the regulation of firearms, including amendment or repeal of existing legislation. Existing laws may also be affected by future judicial rulings and interpretations. These possible changes to existing legislation or the enactment of new legislation may seek to restrict the makeup of a firearm, including limitations on magazine capacity; mandate the use of certain technologies in a firearm; remove existing legal defenses in lawsuits; or ban the sale and, in some cases, the ownership of various types of firearms and accessories. If such restrictive changes to legislation develop, we could find it difficult, expensive, or even impossible to comply with them, impeding new product development and distribution of existing products. In addition, gun-control activists may succeed in imposing restrictions or an outright ban on private firearm ownership. Such restrictions or bans could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition. 15 Our business is subject to extensive regulation. Our business, as well as the business of all producers and marketers of firearms and firearm parts, is subject to numerous federal, state, local, and foreign laws, regulations, and protocols, including the rules and regulations of the ATF. Our firearm business, as well as the business of all producers and marketers of firearms and firearm parts, is subject to numerous federal, state, local, and foreign laws, regulations, and protocols, including the rules and regulations of the ATF. If we fail to comply with ATF rules and regulations, the ATF may limit our activities or growth, fine us, or ultimately put us out of business. The manufacture, sale, and purchase of firearms are subject to extensive federal, state, and local governmental regulation. The primary federal laws are the National Firearms Act of 1934, or NFA, the Gun Control Act of 1968, or GCA, and the Arms Export Control Act of 1976, or AECA, which have been amended from time to time. The NFA severely restricts the private ownership of fully automatic weapons and heavily regulates other firearms defined in that law and accompanying regulations, including firearm suppressors. The GCA places certain restrictions on the interstate sales of firearms, among other things. Most of our products are governed by U.S. Department of Commerce, and are regulated by Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security, or BIS, under the Export Administration Regulations, or EAR. A limited amount of our products are governed by the U.S. Department of State and are subject to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations, or ITAR. We are required to obtain U.S. government authorization for exports, including licensure or other similar authorization prior to engaging in international transactions. The U.S. Government has discretion as to whether to grant a license. In addition, Congress may take action to block a proposed sale of firearms that are export controlled by the Department of State valued at $1 million or higher. In addition, Congress may take action to block a proposed sale of firearms for export valued at $1 million or higher. Consequently, we may not be able to obtain export licenses, or to complete profitable contracts as a result of political or other reasons that are outside our control. Consequently, we may not be able to obtain export licenses, or to complete profitable 23 contracts as a result of political or other reasons that are outside our control. Failure to receive required licenses or authorizations or the termination or suspension of our export privileges could have an adverse effect on our business. Export control laws also impact who is allowed to work in our facilities in most positions. Further, because our manufacturing process includes certain toxic, flammable, and explosive chemicals, we are subject to the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards, as administered by the Department of Homeland Security, which requires that we take additional reporting and security measures related to our manufacturing process. In addition, like many other manufacturers, we are subject to compliance with the Fair Labor Standards Act, the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the data privacy laws of Massachusetts and other jurisdictions, and many other regulations surrounding employment law, environmental law, taxation, and consumer protection. In addition to federal requirements, state and local laws and regulations may place additional restrictions or prohibitions on firearm ownership and transfer. These laws and regulations vary significantly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Some states or other governmental entities have enacted, and others are considering, legislation restricting or prohibiting the ownership, use, or sale of certain categories of firearms, firearm suppressors, ammunition, ammunition feeding devices, or all of these products. Several states require internal or external locking mechanisms for firearms sold in their jurisdictions. Some states mandate, or are considering mandating, certain design features on safety or other grounds. Such legislation could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition. Existing industry protections may be repealed or affected by judicial rulings. For example, the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act of 2005, or the PLCAA, was enacted by Congress in 2005 in order to protect firearms manufacturers and dealers from liability when their legally manufactured and lawfully sold products are later used in criminal acts. The PLCAA (or the state law equivalent of the PLCAA) could be repealed or amended, and legislation has been introduced in Congress to repeal the law. The PLCAA (or the state law equivalent of the PLCAA) may also be affected by future judicial rulings and interpretations. In Soto v. Bushmaster Firearms International, LLC, a case arising from the mass shooting in Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, the Connecticut Court of Appeals allowed claimants to pursue state claims for unfair trade practices and potentially other theories of liability notwithstanding the immunity granted to firearm manufacturers under the PLCAA. If the PLCAA (or the state law equivalent of the PLCAA) were repealed, amended, or reinterpreted, firearms manufacturers could face a significant increase in litigation, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition. Compliance with all of these laws, regulations, and protocols is costly and time consuming. Compliance with all of these laws, regulations, and protocols is costly and time consuming. Although we make substantial efforts to ensure compliance with the many regulations to which we are subject, inadvertent violation of any of these laws, regulations, and protocols could cause us to incur fines and penalties and could also 16 lead to restrictions on our ability to manufacture and sell our products and services and to import or export the products that we sell. Although we make substantial efforts to ensure compliance with the many regulations to which we are subject, inadvertent violation of any of these laws, regulations, and protocols could cause us to incur fines and penalties and could also lead to restrictions on our ability to manufacture and sell our products and services and to import or export the products that we sell. In addition, these laws, regulations, and protocols, as well as their interpretation by courts and regulatory authorities, may change at any time. There can be no assurance that such changes to the laws, regulations, and protocols or to their interpretations will not adversely affect our business. Environmental laws and regulations may impact our business. 43 Environmental laws and regulations may impact our business. We are subject to numerous federal, state, and local laws that regulate or otherwise relate to the protection of the environment, including the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, CERCLA, and the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by RCRA. CERCLA, RCRA, and related state laws subject us to the potential obligation to remove or mitigate the environmental effects of the disposal or release of certain pollutants at our manufacturing facilities and at third-party or formerly owned sites at which contaminants generated by us may be located. This requires us to make expenditures of both a capital and expense nature. In our efforts to satisfy our environmental, health, and safety responsibilities and to comply with all applicable laws and regulations, we maintain policies relating to the environmental, health, and safety standards for our operations and conduct programs to monitor compliance with various environmental regulations. However, in the normal course of our manufacturing operations, we may become subject to governmental proceedings and orders pertaining to waste disposal, air emissions, and water discharges into the environment. We believe, based on the information available to us, that we are in substantial compliance with applicable environmental regulations. From a remediation perspective, we may not have identified all existing contamination on our properties, and we cannot predict whether our operations will cause contamination in the future. As a result, we could incur additional costs to clean up contamination that exceed the amount of our reserves. We will periodically review the probable and reasonably estimable environmental costs in order to update the environmental reserves. Furthermore, it is not possible to predict with certainty the impact on us of future environmental, health, and safety compliance requirements or of the cost of resolution of future regulatory proceedings and claims, in part because the scope of the remedies that may be required is not certain, liability under federal environmental laws is joint and several in nature, and environmental health and safety laws and regulations are subject to modification and changes in interpretation. Additional or changing environmental health and safety regulation may become burdensome in the future, and any such development could have an adverse effect on us. We face risks associated with international activities, including related to compliance with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act or other applicable anti-corruption legislation. Political and economic conditions abroad may result in a reduction of or inhibition of our growth in our sales in numerous foreign countries and our purchase of certain accessories and components from certain countries in Asia and Europe, including China, Taiwan, and Italy. Protectionist trade legislation in either the United States or foreign countries, such as a change in the current tariff structures, export or import compliance laws, or other trade policies, could reduce our ability to sell our products in foreign markets, the ability of foreign customers to purchase our products, and our ability to import components, parts, and products from foreign suppliers. Our efforts to comply with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, or other applicable anti-corruption laws and regulations may limit our international business activities, necessitate the implementation of certain processes and compliance programs, and subject us to enforcement actions or penalties for noncompliance. Both the U.S. and foreign governments have increased their oversight and enforcement activities in this area in recent years, and we expect applicable agencies to continue to increase such activities in the future. Our foreign sales and purchases of certain components also create a number of logistical and communication challenges. Our foreign sales and purchases of certain accessories and components also create a number of logistical and communication challenges. These activities also expose us to various economic, political, and other risks, including the following: • compliance with U.S. and local laws and regulatory requirements, including adverse changes in those laws and requirements; • transportation delays or interruptions and other effects of less developed infrastructures; • foreign exchange rate fluctuations; • limitations on imports and exports; 17 • imposition of restrictions on currency conversion or the transfer of funds; • the possibility of appropriation of our assets without just compensation; • taxes, tariffs, and duties; • the burdens and costs of compliance with a variety of foreign laws; and • political or economic instability in countries in which we conduct business, including possible terrorist acts. and local laws and regulatory requirements, including adverse changes in those laws and requirements; • transportation delays or interruptions and other effects of less developed infrastructures; • foreign exchange rate fluctuations; • limitations on imports and exports; • imposition of restrictions on currency conversion or the transfer of funds; • the possibility of appropriation of our assets without just compensation; • taxes, tariffs, and duties; • the burdens and costs of compliance with a variety of foreign laws; and • political or economic instability in countries in which we conduct business, including possible terrorist acts. We currently maintain an operation in Belgium. As a result, we are exposed to risks in the countries in which we operate, including political and economic changes or volatility, geopolitical regional conflicts, terrorist activity, and political unrest, which could negatively affect our international operations. As a result, we are exposed to risks in the countries in which we operate or will operate in the future, including political and economic changes or volatility, geopolitical regional conflicts, terrorist activity, and political unrest, which could negatively affect our international operations. Protectionist tariffs and trade wars could harm our business. The federal government has, at times, put into place tariffs and other trade restrictions with other countries, including limiting trade and/or imposing tariffs on imports from such countries. In addition, other countries have, at times, either threatened or put into place retaliatory tariffs of their own. We are currently subject to tariffs on certain of our products. Increases in protectionist trade legislation in either the United States or foreign countries, such as a change in the current tariff structures, export or import compliance laws, or other trade policies, could reduce our ability to sell our products in foreign markets, the ability of foreign customers to purchase our products, and our ability to import products, components, and raw materials from foreign suppliers. The United States has imposed and threatened to impose further tariffs on a variety of products and materials imported from various foreign countries, including firearm components. The United States has imposed and threatened to impose further tariffs on a variety of products and materials imported from various foreign countries. Tariff policies of the United States may result in retaliatory actions by affected countries, potentially resulting in trade wars and increased costs for goods imported into the United States. Any tariffs that result in increased costs or unavailability of imported products or components that we obtain for resale from foreign suppliers or raw materials used in the production of our products could require us to increase the prices of the products we sell or result in lower gross margins on such products if we are unable to increase the price of such products to our customers. Furthermore, increased pricing on these products could lead to lower consumer demand. These tariffs have the potential to significantly increase the cost of our products. In such a case, there can be no assurance that we will be able to shift manufacturing and supply agreements to non-impacted countries, including the United States, to reduce the effects of the tariffs. As a result, we may suffer margin erosion or be required to raise our prices, which may result in the loss of customers, negatively impact our operating results, or otherwise harm our business. In addition, the imposition of tariffs on products that we export to international markets could make such products more expensive compared to those of our competitors if we pass related additional costs on to our customers, which may also result in the loss of customers, negatively impact our operating results, or otherwise harm our business. Risks Relating to Manufacturing, Raw Materials and Component Supply, Product Development and Performance, Customer Demand, and Brand Recognition We must continue to introduce new products that are successful in the marketplace. Our success depends on our ability to continue to conceive, design, produce or source, and market in a timely manner a continuing stream of innovative new products that appeal to consumers and achieve market acceptance and drive customer satisfaction and loyalty. The development of new products is a lengthy and costly process. Any new products that we develop and introduce to the marketplace may be unsuccessful in achieving customer or market acceptance or may achieve success that does not meet our expectations for a variety of reasons, including delays in introduction, unfavorable cost comparisons with alternative products, unfavorable customer or consumer acceptance, and unfavorable performance. Our business, operating results, and financial condition could be adversely affected if we fail to introduce new products that consumers want to buy or we incur significant expenses related to proposed new products that prove to be unsuccessful for any reason. 18 Our manufacturing facilities are critical to our success. Our manufacturing facilities are critical to our success. Our Springfield, Massachusetts facility is critical to our success, as we currently produce most of our products at this facility. The Springfield facility also houses our principal research, development, engineering, design, shipping, sales, marketing, finance, and management functions. Any event that causes a disruption of the operation of this facility for even a relatively short period of time would adversely affect our ability to produce and ship many of our products and to provide service to our customers. Any event that causes a disruption of the operation of this facility for even a relatively short period of time would adversely affect our ability to produce and ship many of our firearm products and to provide service to our firearm customers. We frequently make certain changes in our manufacturing operations to modernize the facility and associated equipment and systems as a result of the age of the facility and the need to introduce certain efficiencies in manufacturing and other processes in order to produce our anticipated volume of products in a more efficient and cost-effective manner. We anticipate that we will continue to incur significant capital and other expenditures with respect to the facility, but we may not be successful in continuing to improve efficiencies. We also depend on our Houlton, Maine and Deep River, Connecticut facilities. Our Houlton facility is used primarily as a machining facility for our firearms as well as our handcuffs and restraints, and our Deep River facility is used primarily for custom plastic injection molding services, rapid prototyping, and tooling. A disruption in the activities of these facilities could adversely affect our firearm manufacturing operations. We depend on our new distribution center. We depend on our new distribution facility, which may not produce the benefits expected. We are extremely dependent on our new distribution center in Columbia, Missouri. We are extremely dependent on our new distribution facility in Columbia, Missouri, which just recently became fully operational. The facility includes computer controlled and automated equipment. As a result, the operations of the facility are complicated and may be subject to a number of risks related to security or computer viruses, the proper operation of software and hardware, electronic or power interruptions, and other system failures. In addition, because substantially all of our products are distributed from one location, our operations could be interrupted by labor difficulties, extreme or severe weather conditions, or by floods, fires, or other natural disasters near our facility. Our ability to successfully operate the facility depends on numerous factors, including the proper design of the facility, the ability to employ an adequate number of skilled workers to operate the facility, the design and operation of computer controlled and automated systems, the design of software systems to operate the facility, and the integration of the facility into our ERP system. Difficulties or delays in performing any of these critical tasks could negatively impact our operating results. Our ability to meet customer expectations, manage inventory, complete sales, and achieve objectives for operating profits will depend on our proper operation of the facility. We rely on our supply chain for our production and any interruptions in these arrangements could disrupt our ability to fill our customers’ orders. 27 We rely on outsourcing for a portion of our production, and any interruptions in these arrangements could disrupt our ability to fill our customers’ orders. We utilize contract manufacturers for a portion of our production requirements, particularly during periods of very high customer demand, in order to increase our manufacturing capacity and reduce our capital expenditures for facilities that may not always operate at peak capacity. We utilize contract manufacturers for a portion of our firearm production requirements, particularly during periods of very high customer demand, in order to increase our manufacturing capacity and reduce our capital expenditures for facilities that may not always operate at peak capacity. Qualifying new contract manufacturers is time consuming and may result in unforeseen disruptions in our manufacturing and operations. The loss of our relationships with our contract manufacturers or their inability to conduct their services for us as anticipated in terms of capacity, cost, quality, and timeliness could adversely affect our ability to fill customer orders in accordance with required delivery, quality, and performance requirements. If this were to occur, the resulting decline in revenue could harm our business. The ability of our suppliers to effectively satisfy our production requirements could also be impacted by their financial difficulty or damage to their operations caused by fire, pandemic, such as the current coronavirus pandemic, terrorist attack, natural disaster, or other events. The failure of any supplier to perform to our expectations could result in supply shortages or delays for certain products and product components and harm our business. If we experience significantly increased demand, or if we need to replace an existing supplier as a result of a lack of performance, we may be unable to supplement or replace our production capacity on a timely basis or on terms that are acceptable to us, which may increase our costs, reduce our margins, and harm our ability to deliver our products on time. For certain of our products, it may take a significant amount of time to identify and qualify a supplier that has the capability and resources to meet our product specifications in sufficient volume and satisfy our service and quality control standards. Political and economic instability in countries in which foreign suppliers are located, the 19 financial and managerial instability of suppliers, the failure by suppliers to meet our standards, failure to meet production deadlines, insufficient quality control, problems with production capacity, labor problems experienced by our suppliers, the availability of raw materials to our suppliers, product quality issues, currency exchange rates, transport availability and cost, inflation, and other factors relating to suppliers and the countries in which they are located are beyond our control. Political and economic instability in countries in which foreign suppliers are located, the financial and managerial instability of suppliers, the failure by suppliers to meet our standards, failure to meet production deadlines, insufficient quality control, problems with production capacity, labor problems experienced by our suppliers, the availability of raw materials to our suppliers, product quality issues, currency exchange rates, transport availability and cost, inflation, and other factors relating to suppliers and the countries in which they are located are beyond our control. Although we have insurance to cover potential loss from most of our suppliers for these events, we could experience losses in excess of our insured limits and any claims for various losses could be denied. In addition, failure to take adequate steps to mitigate the likelihood or potential impact of such events, or to effectively manage such events if they occur, could have a material adverse effect on us, as well as require additional resources to restore our supply chain. The capacity of our contract manufacturers to produce our products also depends upon the cost and availability of raw materials. 28 The capacity of our contract manufacturers to produce our products also depends upon the cost and availability of raw materials. Our contract manufacturers and other suppliers may not be able to obtain sufficient supply of raw materials, which could result in delays in deliveries of our products by our manufacturers or increased costs. Any shortage of raw materials or inability of a manufacturer to produce or ship our products in a timely manner, or at all, could impair our ability to ship orders of our products in a cost-efficient, timely manner and could cause us to miss the delivery requirements of our customers. As a result, we could experience cancellations of orders, refusals to accept deliveries, or reductions in our prices and margins, any of which could harm our financial performance, reputation, and operating results. We have occasionally received, and may receive in the future, product deliveries from suppliers that fail to conform to our quality control standards. In such circumstances, our inability to sell those products could have a negative effect on our net sales and increase our administrative and shipping costs if we are unable to obtain replacement products in a timely manner. Our operating results could be materially harmed if we are unable to forecast demand for our products accurately. We often schedule internal production and place orders for product components and raw materials with third-party suppliers before receiving firm orders from our customers. We often schedule internal production and place orders for finished products, product components, and raw materials with third-party suppliers before receiving firm orders from our customers. If we fail to accurately forecast customer demand, we may experience excess inventory levels or a shortage of products to deliver to our customers. Factors that could affect our ability to accurately forecast demand for our products include the following: • our failure to accurately forecast customer acceptance of new products; • an increase or decrease in consumer demand for our products or for the products of our competitors; • new product introductions by competitors; • our relationships with customers; • general market conditions and other factors, which may result in cancellations of orders or a reduction or increase in the rate of reorders placed by customers; • general market conditions, economic conditions, and consumer confidence levels, which could reduce demand for discretionary items, such as our products; and • the domestic political environment, including debates over the regulation of various consumer products, such as firearms. Inventory levels in excess of customer demand may result in inventory write-downs and the sale of excess inventory at discounted prices, which could have an adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition. If we underestimate demand for our products, we and our third-party suppliers may not be able to produce products to meet customer demand, and this could result in delays in the shipment of products and lost revenues, as well as damage to our reputation and customer relationships. We may not be able to manage inventory levels successfully to meet future order and reorder requirements. It is difficult to align our capacity with our demand. From time to time, we have been capacity constrained and have been unable to satisfy on a timely basis the demand for some of our products. During the last several fiscal years, we have improved our manufacturing 20 productivity by adding capacity, increasing daily production quantities, increasing operational availability of equipment, reducing machinery down time, extending machinery useful life, and increasing manufacturing efficiency. During the last several fiscal years, we have improved our manufacturing productivity by adding capacity, increasing daily production quantities, increasing operational availability of equipment, reducing machinery down time, extending machinery useful life, and increasing manufacturing efficiency. Future significant increases in consumer demand for our products or increased business from law enforcement or military agencies may require us to expand further our manufacturing capacity, particularly through the purchase of additional manufacturing equipment and the addition of manufacturing space. We may not be able to increase our capacity in time to satisfy increases in demand that may occur from time-to-time, and we may not have adequate financial resources to increase capacity to meet demand. We may not be able to increase our capacity in time to satisfy increases in demand that may occur from time-to-time, and we may not have 26 adequate financial resources to increase capacity to meet demand. Capacity constraints may prevent us from satisfying customer orders and result in a loss of market share to competitors that are not capacity constrained. At other times we may suffer excess capacity and increased overhead costs, particularly if we increase our capacity to meet actual or anticipated demand and that demand decreases or does not materialize. At other times, such as recently, we may suffer excess capacity and increased overhead costs, particularly if we increase our capacity to meet actual or anticipated demand and that demand decreases or does not materialize. Various actions that we have taken in the past, such as outsourcing a portion of our production and reducing our expenses, enable us to mitigate the effect of reduced product demand, but such actions cannot totally mitigate the effect of reduced product demand. Shortages of and price increases for components, parts, raw materials, and other supplies may delay or reduce our sales and increase our costs. Shortages of, and price increases for, components, parts, raw materials, and other supplies may delay or reduce our sales and increase our costs. Although we manufacture most of the components for our firearms, we purchase certain components and parts from third parties, including bolt carriers, rifle receivers, magazines, slides, small parts, barrels, and rifle stocks. We also purchase ammunition for product testing. Most of our major suppliers for our products are U. Most of our major suppliers for our firearm products are U. S.-based and provide materials, components, and parts, such as raw steel, polymer components, and metal-injected-molded components. We have become increasingly dependent on a small number of key vendors that supply components and parts for our firearms as a result of our decision to increase our manufacturing flexibility by using third parties that can supplement our internal capacity to better react to changes in market conditions. We also use numerous raw materials that we purchase from third-party suppliers in producing and testing our products, including steel, wood, lead, brass, and plastics. Inflationary pressures, such as the U.S. is currently experiencing, could result in increases in the cost of the components, parts, raw materials, and other supplies necessary for the production of our products. Our suppliers also may encounter difficulties or increased costs in obtaining the materials necessary to produce the components and parts that we use in our products. The costs of these components, parts, raw materials, and other supplies are at competitive rates, and we typically have short-term commitments from our suppliers. In addition, uncertainties related to governmental fiscal policies, including increased duties, tariffs, or other trade restrictions, could increase the prices of components, parts, raw materials, and other supplies we purchase from third-party suppliers. Uncertainties related to governmental fiscal policies, including increased duties, tariffs, or other trade restrictions, could increase the prices of finished products, components, and raw materials we purchase from third-party suppliers. As a result, if we are unable to respond to cost increases for these supplies with selling price increases, our earnings could be adversely impacted. Our inability to obtain sufficient quantities of components, parts, raw materials, and other supplies from independent sources necessary for the production of our products could result in reduced or delayed sales or lost orders. Any delay in or loss of sales could adversely impact our operating results. Many of the components, parts, raw materials, and other supplies used in the production of our products are available only from a limited number of suppliers. In most cases, we do not have long-term supply contracts with these suppliers. As a result, we could be subject to increased costs, supply interruptions, and difficulties in obtaining materials and finished products. Our suppliers also may encounter difficulties or increased costs in obtaining the materials necessary to produce the components and parts that we use in our products. The time lost in seeking and acquiring new sources or the inability to locate alternative sources of comparable quality at an acceptable price, or at all, could negatively impact our net sales and profitability. Shortages of ammunition also can adversely affect the demand for our products. Our business is highly dependent upon our brand recognition and reputation, and the failure to maintain or strengthen our brand recognition or reputation would likely have a material adverse effect on our business. Our business is highly dependent upon our brand recognition and reputation, and the failure to maintain or strengthen our brand recognition or reputation would likely have a material adverse effect on our business. Our brand recognition and reputation are critical aspects of our business. We believe that maintaining and further enhancing our brands is critical to retaining existing customers and attracting new customers. We believe that maintaining and further enhancing all of our brands is critical to retaining existing customers and attracting new customers. We also believe that the importance of our brand recognition and reputation will continue to increase as competition in our markets continues to develop. We anticipate that our advertising, marketing, and promotional efforts will increase in the foreseeable future as we continue to seek to enhance our brand recognition and the consumer demand for our products. Historically, we have relied on print and electronic media advertising to increase consumer awareness of our brands to increase 21 purchasing intent and conversation. We anticipate that we will increasingly rely on other forms of media advertising, including social media and digital marketing. Our future growth and profitability will depend in large part upon the effectiveness and efficiency of our advertising, promotion, public relations, and marketing programs. These brand promotion activities may not yield increased revenue and the efficacy of these activities will depend on a number of factors, including our ability to do the following: • determine the appropriate creative message and media mix and markets for advertising, marketing, and promotional expenditures; • select the right markets, media, and specific media vehicles in which to advertise; • identify the most effective and efficient level of spending in each market, media, and specific media vehicle; and • effectively manage marketing costs, including creative and media expenses, in order to maintain acceptable customer acquisition costs. These brand promotion activities may not yield increased revenue and the efficacy of these activities will depend on a number of factors, including our ability to do the following: 37 • determine the appropriate creative message and media mix and markets for advertising, marketing, and promotional expenditures; • select the right markets, media, and specific media vehicles in which to advertise; • identify the most effective and efficient level of spending in each market, media, and specific media vehicle; and • effectively manage marketing costs, including creative and media expenses, in order to maintain acceptable customer acquisition costs. Increases in the pricing of one or more of our marketing and advertising channels could increase our marketing and advertising expenses or cause us to choose less expensive but possibly less effective marketing and advertising channels. If we implement new marketing and advertising strategies, we may incur significantly higher costs than our current costs, which in turn could adversely affect our operating results. Implementing new marketing and advertising strategies also could increase the risk of devoting significant capital and other resources to endeavors that do not prove to be cost effective. We also may incur marketing and advertising expenses significantly in advance of the time we anticipate recognizing revenue associated with such expenses, and our marketing and advertising expenditures may not generate sufficient levels of brand awareness and conversation or result in increased revenue. Even if our marketing and advertising expenses result in increased revenue, the increase might not offset our related expenditures. If we are unable to maintain our marketing and advertising channels on cost-effective terms or replace or supplement existing marketing and advertising channels with similarly or more effective channels, our marketing and advertising expenses could increase substantially, our customer base could be adversely affected, and our business, operating results, financial condition, and reputation could suffer. In addition, we may determine that certain of our products and brands benefit from endorsements and support from particular sporting enthusiasts, athletes, or other celebrities, and those products and brands may become personally associated with those individuals. As a result, sales of the endorsed products could be materially and adversely affected if any of those individuals’ images, reputations, or popularity were to be negatively impacted. Poor product quality or performance could adversely affect our operating results and reputation. Poor product quality or performance could adversely affect our operating results and reputation. Poor product quality or performance could adversely affect our operating results and reputation. We generally provide a limited one-year, three-year, limited-lifetime, or full-lifetime warranty and a lifetime-service policy to the original purchaser of our new firearm products While we believe we have a strong track record of developing, manufacturing, and selling high-quality products, from time to time, we have experienced manufacturing and design issues with respect to some of our firearms and have initiated product recalls and safety alerts in the past. We generally provide a limited one-year, three-year, limited-lifetime, or full-lifetime warranty and a lifetime-service policy to the original purchaser of our new firearm products and a limited one-year warranty to the original purchaser of our new outdoor products and accessories. Based on the volume of products we have shipped into the market, any future recall, safety alerts, or product liability claims could harm our reputation, cause us to lose business, and cause us to incur significant warranty, support, and repair costs. The failure to manage our growth could adversely affect our operations. The failure to manage our growth could adversely affect our operations. To continue to expand our business and strengthen our competitive position, we must make significant investments in systems, equipment, facilities, and personnel. In addition, we may commit significant funds to increase our sales, marketing, information technology, and research and development efforts in order to expand our business. As a result of the increase in fixed costs and operating expenses, our failure to increase sufficiently our net sales to offset these increased costs could adversely affect our operating results. 22 The failure to manage our growth effectively could adversely affect our operations. The failure to manage our growth effectively could adversely affect our operations. Managing our planned growth effectively may require us to: • enhance our operational, financial, and management systems; • enhance our facilities and purchase additional equipment, which will include ongoing modernization and expansion of our Springfield, Massachusetts, Deep River, Connecticut, and Houlton, Maine facilities; and • successfully hire, train, and motivate additional employees, including additional personnel for our technological, sales, and marketing efforts. Managing our planned growth effectively will require us to: • enhance our operational, financial, and management systems; • enhance our facilities and purchase additional equipment, which will include ongoing modernization and expansion of our Springfield, Massachusetts, Deep River, Connecticut, and Houlton, Maine facilities; • achieve the anticipated benefits of our new national logistics facility; and • successfully hire, train, and motivate additional employees, including additional personnel for our technological, sales, and marketing efforts. The expansion of our products and customer base may result in increases in our overhead and selling expenses. We also may be required to increase staffing and other expenses as well as our expenditures on capital equipment and leasehold improvements in order to meet the demand for our products. Any increase in expenditures in anticipation of future sales that do not materialize would adversely affect our profitability. We face intense competition that could result in our losing or failing to gain market share and suffering reduced sales. We face intense competition that could result in our losing or failing to gain market share and suffering reduced sales. We operate in intensely competitive consumer markets that are characterized by competition from major domestic and international companies. This intense competition could result in pricing pressures, lower sales, reduced margins, and lower market share. Some of our competitors may have greater financial, technical, marketing, distribution, and other resources and, in certain cases, may have lower cost structures than we possess that may afford them competitive advantages. As a result, they may be able to devote greater resources to the promotion and sale of products, negotiate lower prices on raw materials and components, deliver competitive products at lower prices, and introduce new products and respond to customer requirements more effectively and quickly than we can. Competition in the consumer products industry is primarily based on innovation, quality, reliability, durability, price, performance, consumer brand awareness, and customer service and support. Our inability to compete in one or more of these areas could have a negative impact on our business, operating results, and financial condition. Our operating results depend upon the level of consumer spending, which is sensitive to global economic conditions and other factors. 22 Our operating results depend upon the level of consumer spending, which is sensitive to global economic conditions and other factors. The success of many aspects of our business depends on consumer spending, and there are a number of factors that influence consumer spending, including actual and perceived economic conditions; disposable consumer income; interest rates; consumer credit availability; employment levels; stock market performance; weather conditions; energy prices; consumer discretionary spending patterns; and tax rates in the international, national, regional, and local markets where our products are produced or sold. The current global economic environment is unpredictable, and adverse economic trends or other factors could negatively impact the level of consumer spending, which could have a material adverse impact on us. Acquisitions involve significant risks, and any acquisitions that we undertake in the future could be difficult to integrate, disrupt our business, dilute stockholder value, and harm our operating results. Acquisitions involve significant risks, and any acquisitions that we undertake in the future could be difficult to integrate, disrupt our business, dilute stockholder value, and harm our operating results. Although it is not our current strategy, we may, at some point, decide to expand our operations through acquisitions in order to enhance our existing products and offer new products, enter new markets and businesses, strengthen and avoid interruption from our supply chain, and improve our position in current markets and businesses. Acquisitions involve significant risks and uncertainties. We cannot accurately predict the timing, size, and success of any future acquisitions. We may be unable to identify suitable acquisition candidates or to complete the acquisitions of candidates that we identify. Increased competition for acquisition candidates or increased asking prices by acquisition candidates may increase purchase prices for acquisitions to levels beyond our financial capability or to levels that would not result in the returns required by our acquisition criteria. Acquisitions also may become more difficult in the future as we or others acquire the most attractive candidates. Unforeseen expenses, 23 difficulties, and delays frequently encountered in connection with expansion through acquisitions could inhibit our growth and negatively impact our business, operating results, and financial condition. Unforeseen expenses, difficulties, and delays frequently encountered in connection with expansion through acquisitions could inhibit our growth and negatively impact our business, operating results, and financial condition. We may have little or no experience with certain acquired businesses, which could involve significantly different supply chains, production techniques, customers, and competitive factors than our current business. We may have little or no experience with certain acquired businesses, which could involve significantly different supply chains, production techniques, customers, and competitive factors than our current business. This lack of experience would require us to rely to a great extent on the management teams of these acquired businesses. These acquisitions also could require us to make significant investments in systems, equipment, facilities, and personnel in anticipation of growth. These costs could be essential to implement our growth strategy in supporting our expanded activities and resulting corporate structure changes. We may be unable to achieve some or all of the benefits that we expect to achieve as we expand into these new markets within the time frames we expect, if at all. If we fail to achieve some or all of the benefits that we expect to achieve as we expand into these new markets, or do not achieve them within the time frames we expect, our business, operating results, and financial condition could be adversely affected. As a part of any potential acquisition, we may engage in discussions with various acquisition candidates. In connection with these discussions, the parties may exchange confidential operational and financial information, conduct due diligence inquiries, and consider the structure, terms, and conditions of the potential acquisition. In connection with these discussions, we and each potential acquisition candidate may exchange confidential operational and financial information, conduct due diligence inquiries, and consider the structure, terms, and conditions of the potential acquisition. In certain cases, the prospective acquisition candidate may agree not to discuss a potential acquisition with any other party for a specific period of time and agree to take other actions designed to enhance the possibility of the acquisition, such as preparing audited financial information. Potential acquisition discussions frequently take place over a long period of time and involve difficult business integration and other issues. As a result of these and other factors, a number of potential acquisitions that from time-to-time appear likely to occur do not result in binding legal agreements and are not consummated, but may result in increased legal, consulting, and other costs. Unforeseen expenses, difficulties, and delays frequently encountered in connection with future acquisitions could inhibit our growth and negatively impact our profitability. Any future acquisitions may not meet our strategic objectives or perform as anticipated. In addition, the size, timing, and success of any future acquisitions may cause substantial fluctuations in our operating results from quarter to quarter. These interim fluctuations could adversely affect the market price of our common stock. If we finance any future acquisitions in whole or in part through the issuance of common stock or securities convertible into or exercisable for common stock, existing stockholders will experience dilution in the voting power of their common stock and earnings per share could be negatively impacted. The extent to which we will be able or willing to use our common stock for acquisitions will depend on the market price of our common stock from time-to-time and the willingness of potential acquisition candidates to accept our common stock as full or partial consideration for the sale of their businesses. Our inability to use our common stock as consideration, to generate cash from operations, or to obtain additional funding through debt or equity financings in order to pursue an acquisition could limit our growth. We may have difficulty collecting amounts owed to us. We may have difficulty collecting amounts owed to us. Certain of our customers have experienced, and may in the future experience, credit-related issues. We perform ongoing credit evaluations of customers, but these evaluations may not be completely effective. We grant payment terms to most customers ranging from 20 to 90 days and do not generally require collateral. However, in some instances we provide longer payment terms, particularly as it relates to our hunting products. Should more customers than we anticipate experience liquidity issues, or if payment is not received on a timely basis, we may have difficulty collecting amounts owed to us by such customers and our business, operating results, and financial condition could be adversely impacted. For the year ended April 30, 2021, sales to four of our customers exceeded 10% of our net sales from continuing operations and two of our customers accounted for approximately 28.4% of our accounts receivable. For the fiscal year ended April 30, 2020, four of our customers exceeded 10% of our net sales from continuing operations and accounted for approximately 42. For the fiscal year ended April 30, 2019, none of our customers exceeded 10% of our net sales and one of our customers accounted for approximately 19. 2% of our accounts receivable. For the fiscal year ended April 30, 2019, one of our customers accounted for 10.4% of our net sales from continuing operations and one of our customers accounted for approximately 23.1% our accounts receivable.8% of our accounts receivable. 24 Liability insurance is expensive and may be difficult to obtain. Liability insurance is expensive and may be difficult to obtain. Liability insurance coverage is expensive and from time to time may be difficult or impossible to obtain. Our insurance policies are subject to periodic review by our insurers and may not be renewed at all or on similar or favorable terms. Because we manufacture and sell firearms, insurance carriers may decide not to insure us in the future. In addition, if we or other firearms manufacturers sustain significant losses or make significant insurance claims, our ability to obtain future insurance coverage at commercially reasonable rates could be materially adversely affected. Our liability insurance costs were $5.9 million in fiscal 2021 and $3.9 million in fiscal 2020.8 million in fiscal 2019. An inability to obtain liability insurance, significant increases in the cost of insurance we obtain, or losses in excess of our liability insurance coverage, could have a material adverse effect on us. An inability to obtain liability insurance, significant increases in the cost of insurance we obtain, or losses in excess of 30 our liability insurance coverage, could have a material adverse effect on us. For the reasons described herein, in fiscal 2020, we established a wholly owned captive insurance company to help mitigate these risks, but the funding by us of such insurance company may not be enough to adequately cover the cost of claims against us, if any. An inability to reach customers through social platforms could reduce our future growth. Consumers are increasingly leveraging online platforms, and we face intense pressure to reach our customers through social media platforms. We plan to continue to expand our brand recognition and product loyalty through social media and our websites, with generation of original content. We plan to continue to expand our brand recognition and product loyalty through social media and our websites, with generation of original content. These efforts are intended to yield greater traffic to our websites and increase our consumer demand. These efforts are intended to yield greater traffic to our websites and increase our direct-to-consumer revenue. We are subject to deplatforming, whereby our ability to share information on social platforms or websites could be blocked, limiting our ability to reach our customers through such avenues. Our business is subject to the risk of earthquakes, fire, power outages, floods, and other catastrophic events and to interruption by problems such as terrorism, cyberattacks, or failure of key information technology systems. 31 Our business is subject to the risk of earthquakes, fire, power outages, floods, and other catastrophic events and to interruption by problems such as terrorism, cyberattacks, or failure of key information technology systems. Our business is vulnerable to damage or interruption from earthquakes, fires, floods, power losses, telecommunications failures, terrorist attacks, acts of war, human errors, criminal acts, public health crises, such as pandemics and epidemics, and other similar events. These risks are particularly substantial because we conduct substantially all of our operations from one location. We maintain casualty and business interruption insurance, but it may not adequately protect us from the types and amounts of losses we may incur or from the adverse effect that may be caused by significant disruptions in our product distribution, such as the long-term loss of customers or an erosion of our brand image. In addition, the facilities of certain of our suppliers are subject to the same and additional risks. Our computer systems may also be vulnerable to computer viruses, criminal acts, denial-of-service attacks, ransomware, and similar disruptions from unauthorized tampering with our computer systems, which could lead to interruptions, delays, or loss of critical data. Our computer systems may also be vulnerable to computer viruses, criminal acts, denial-of-service attacks, ransomware, and similar disruptions from unauthorized tampering with our computer systems, which could lead to interruptions, delays, or loss of critical data. As we rely heavily on our information technology and communications systems and the Internet to conduct our business and provide high-quality customer service, these disruptions could harm our ability to run our business and either directly or indirectly disrupt our suppliers’ or manufacturers’ businesses, which could harm our business, operating results, and financial condition. As we rely heavily on our information technology and communications systems and the Internet to conduct our business and provide high-quality customer service, these disruptions could harm our ability to run our business and either directly or indirectly disrupt our suppliers’ or manufacturers’ businesses, which could harm our business, operating results, and financial condition Interruptions in the proper functioning of our information systems or other issues with our ERP systems could cause disruption to our operations. Risks Related to Legal Proceedings, Product Recalls, and Other Product Liabilities Our business involves the potential for product recalls, product liability, and other claims against us, which could affect our earnings and financial condition. As a distributor of non-firearm consumer products, such as handcuffs, we are subject to the U. As a distributor of non-firearm consumer products, we are subject to the U. S. Consumer Products Safety Act of 1972, as amended by the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008, which empowers the Consumer Products Safety Commission to exclude from the market products that are found to be unsafe or hazardous, and similar laws under foreign jurisdictions. Under certain circumstances, the Consumer Products Safety Commission or comparable foreign agency could require us to repurchase or recall one or more of our products. Additionally, other laws and agencies regulate certain consumer products sold by us and more restrictive laws and regulations may be adopted in the future. Any repurchase or recall of our products could be costly and damage our reputation. If we were required to remove, or we voluntarily remove, our products from the market, our reputation could be tarnished, and we might have large quantities of finished products that we could not sell. We also face exposure to product liability claims in the event that one of our products is alleged to have resulted in property damage, bodily injury, or other adverse effects. In addition to the risk of substantial monetary 25 judgments, fines, or penalties that may result from any governmental investigations, product liability claims, or regulatory actions, such events could result in negative publicity that could harm our reputation in the marketplace, adversely impact the value of our brands, and result in an increase in the cost of producing our products. In addition to the risk of substantial monetary judgments, fines, or penalties that may result from any governmental investigations, product liability claims, or regulatory actions, such events could result in negative publicity that could harm our reputation in the marketplace, adversely impact the value of our brands, and result in an increase in the cost of producing our products. Similar to product liability claims, we face exposure to class action lawsuits related to the performance, safety, or advertising of our products. Such class action lawsuits could result in substantial monetary judgments, injunctions related to the sale of products, and potentially tarnish our reputation. In fiscal 2020, we formed a wholly owned captive insurance company, which provides product liability insurance to us and our subsidiaries. In fiscal 2020, we formed a wholly owned captive insurance company, which provides firearm product liability insurance to us and our subsidiaries. This captive insurance company was included in our consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year end April 30, 2021 and 2020. Although we maintain product liability insurance in amounts that we believe are reasonable, that insurance is, in most cases, subject to large self-insured retentions for which we are responsible, and we cannot assure you that we will be able to maintain such insurance on acceptable terms, if at all, in the future or that product liability claims will not exceed the amount of insurance coverage. As a result, product recalls or product liability claims could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition. In addition, we face potential other types of litigation arising out of alleged defects in our products or otherwise, such as class action lawsuits. We do not maintain insurance against many types of claims involving alleged defects in our products that do not involve personal injury or property damage. We spend substantial resources ensuring compliance with governmental and other applicable standards. Our product liability insurance program is an occurrence-based program based on our current and historical claims experience and the availability and cost of insurance. We cannot assure you, however, that our future product liability experience will be consistent with our past experience or that claims and awards will not substantially impact the costs of our insurance programs in the future. We are subject to lawsuits and governmental investigations and inquiries. We are subject to lawsuits and governmental investigations and inquiries. We are currently involved in several lawsuits, including a lawsuit involving a municipality and several product liability lawsuits. We are vigorously defending ourselves in the lawsuits to which we are subject. There can be no assurance, however, that we will not have to pay significant damages or amounts in settlement above insurance coverage. An unfavorable outcome or prolonged litigation could harm our business. Litigation of this nature is also expensive and time consuming and may divert the time and attention of our management. Our products expose us to potential product liability, warranty liability, and personal injury claims, as well as litigation relating to the use or misuse of our products. These include allegations of defects in manufacturing and design, failure to warn of inherent dangers in the product itself or activities associated with the product, and negligence and strict liability. In addition, as described earlier, we could be subject to future litigation arising out of the criminal misuse of our firearms. If successful, such claims could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition. Although we maintain product liability insurance in amounts that we believe are reasonable, we may not be able to maintain such insurance on acceptable terms, if at all, in the future, and product liability claims may exceed the amount of insurance coverage available to us. Because we manufacture and sell firearms, insurance carriers may decide not to insure our products or our company in the future. In addition, our reputation may be adversely affected by such claims, whether or not successful, including potential negative publicity about our products. Due to the nature of our products, we anticipate that we will continue to be involved in litigation, including product liability cases and claims in the future. Defects in our products could reduce demand and result in a decrease in sales or damage to our reputation. Our products can contain latent defects that are not detected until after the product is introduced to the market. In addition, we obtain many of our products and component parts from third-party suppliers and may not be able to detect defects until after they are sold. Defects in our products may result in a loss of sales, recall or corrective action expenses, damage to our reputation, and increased warranty costs, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition. 26 We have been and may continue to be subject to governmental investigations and inquiries. Such investigations and inquiries could subject us to various sanctions, including significant civil and criminal penalties, the indictment of our company or various of our officers and employees, our being prevented from bidding on domestic military and government contracts, restriction by the U.S. Government, including by the U.S. Department of State or U. Department of State. S. Department of Commerce on exporting our products, private civil litigation arising out of the outcome of the investigations or inquiries, the diversion of time and attention of our management from normal business operations, and a negative impact on the perception of our company by investors, customers, and others. Department of State, private civil litigation arising out of the outcome of the investigations or inquiries, the diversion of time and attention of our management from normal business operations, and a negative impact on the perception of our company by investors, customers, and others. We produce or source and sell products that create exposure to potential product liability, warranty liability, or personal injury claims and litigation. We produce or source and sell products that create exposure to potential product liability, warranty liability, or personal injury claims and litigation. Some of our products involve or are used in applications and situations that involve risk of personal injury and death. Our products expose us to potential product liability, warranty liability, personal injury claims, and litigation relating to the use or misuse of our products, including allegations of defects in manufacturing, defects in design, a failure to warn of dangers inherent in the product or activities associated with the product, negligence, and strict liability. If successful, such claims could have a material adverse effect on our business. In addition, defects in our products could reduce demand for our products and result in a decrease in sales and market acceptance and damage to our reputation. Components used in our products may contain undetected defects that are subsequently discovered at any point in the life of the product. In addition, we obtain many of our finished products and product components from third-party suppliers and may not be able to detect defects in such products or components until after they are sold. Defects in our products may result in a loss of sales, recall expenses, delay in market acceptance, damage to our reputation, and increased warranty costs, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition. Risks Relating to Intellectual Property, Information Systems, and Cybersecurity Our inability to protect our intellectual property or obtain the right to use intellectual property from third parties could impair our competitive advantage, reduce our sales, and increase our costs. Our success and ability to compete depend in part on our ability to protect our intellectual property. We rely on a combination of patents, copyrights, trade secrets, trademarks, trade dress, customer records, monitoring, brand protection services, confidentiality agreements, and other contractual provisions to protect our intellectual property, but these measures may provide only limited protection. Our failure to enforce and protect our intellectual property rights or obtain the right to use necessary intellectual property from third parties may lead to our loss of trademark and service mark rights, brand loyalty, and notoriety among our customers and prospective customers. The scope of any intellectual property to which we have or may obtain rights may not prevent others from developing and selling competing products. In addition, our intellectual property may be held invalid upon challenge, or others may claim rights in, or ownership of, our intellectual property. Moreover, we may become subject to litigation with parties that claim, among other matters, that we infringed their patents or other intellectual property rights. The defense and prosecution of patent and other intellectual property claims are both costly and time-consuming and could result in a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition. Patents may not be issued for the patent applications that we have filed or may file in the future. Our issued patents may be challenged, invalidated, or circumvented, and claims of our patents may not be of sufficient scope or strength, or issued in the proper geographic regions, to provide meaningful protection or any commercial advantage. We have registered certain of our trademarks and trade dress in the United States and other countries. We have also recorded certain of our registered trademarks with customs officials in the United States and other countries. We may be unable to enforce existing or obtain new registrations of principle or other trademarks in key markets. Failure to obtain or enforce such registrations could compromise our ability to protect fully our trademarks and brands and could increase the risk of challenges from third parties to our use of our trademarks and brands. In the past, we did not consistently require our employees and consultants to enter into confidentiality agreements, employment agreements, or proprietary information and invention agreements; however, such agreements are now required. 41 In the past, we did not consistently require our employees and consultants to enter into confidentiality agreements, employment agreements, or proprietary information and invention agreements; however, such agreements are now required. Therefore, our former employees and consultants may try to claim some ownership 27 interest in our intellectual property and may use our intellectual property competitively and without appropriate limitations. Therefore, our former employees and consultants may try to claim some ownership interest in our intellectual property and may use our intellectual property competitively and without appropriate limitations. In addition, our acquired businesses may not have consistently required their employees and consultants to enter into confidentiality agreements, employment agreements, or proprietary information and invention agreements. Claims by such individuals may affect our business, operating results, and financial condition. We may incur substantial expenses and devote significant resources in prosecuting others for their unauthorized use of our intellectual property rights. We may incur substantial expenses and devote significant resources in prosecuting others for their unauthorized use of our intellectual property rights. We may become involved in litigation regarding patents and other intellectual property rights. Other companies, including our competitors, may develop intellectual property that is similar or superior to our intellectual property, duplicate our intellectual property, or design around our patents and may have or obtain patents or other proprietary rights that would prevent, limit, or interfere with our ability to make, use, or sell our products. Effective intellectual property protection may be unavailable or limited in some foreign countries in which we sell products or from which competing products may be sold. Unauthorized parties may attempt to copy or otherwise use aspects of our intellectual property and products that we regard as proprietary. Our means of protecting our proprietary rights in the United States or abroad may prove to be inadequate and competitors may be able to independently develop similar intellectual property. If our intellectual property protection is insufficient to protect our intellectual property rights, we could face increased competition in the markets for our products. Should any of our competitors file patent applications or obtain patents that claim inventions also claimed by us, we may choose to participate in an interference proceeding to determine the right to a patent for these inventions because our business would be harmed if we fail to enforce and protect our intellectual property rights. Even if the outcome is favorable, this proceeding could result in substantial cost to us and disrupt our business. In the future, we also may need to file lawsuits to enforce our intellectual property rights, protect our trade secrets, or determine the validity and scope of the proprietary rights of others. This litigation, whether successful or unsuccessful, could result in substantial costs and diversion of resources, which could have a material adverse effect on us. Interruptions in the proper functioning of our information systems or other issues with our ERP systems could cause disruption to our operations. We rely extensively on our information systems to manage our business, data, communications, supply chain, ordering, pricing, billing, inventory replenishment, accounting functions, and other processes. Our systems are subject to damage or interruption from various sources, including computer and telecommunications failures, computer viruses, cyber security breaches, attacks by hackers and other breaches, introduction of malware or ransomware, phishing attacks, denial of service attacks, blocking of authorized service attacks, vandalism, severe weather conditions, power outages, catastrophic events, terrorism, and human error, and our disaster recovery planning cannot account for all eventualities. If our systems are damaged, fail to function properly, or otherwise become compromised or unavailable, we may incur substantial costs to repair or replace them, and we may experience loss of critical data and interruptions or delays in our ability to perform critical functions, which could adversely affect our business, operating results, and financial condition. Our information technology systems require periodic modifications, upgrades, and replacement that subject us to costs and risks, including potential disruption to our internal control structure, substantial capital expenditures, additional administration and operating expenses, retention of sufficiently skilled personnel or outside firms to implement and operate existing or new systems, and other risks and costs of delays or difficulties in transitioning to new or modified systems or of integrating new or modified systems into our current systems. In addition, challenges implementing new or modified technology systems may cause disruptions in our business operations and have an adverse effect on our business operations if not anticipated and appropriately mitigated. We operate our business utilizing SAP, which is a fully integrated ERP system. We continue to implement various modules and additional usages of SAP. Any of those implementations could result in a major disruption to our business, and any disruption could have a negative effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition. In addition, utilizing SAP has required and will continue to require significant resources and refinement to fully realize the expected benefits of the system. 28 Breaches of our information systems could adversely affect our reputation, disrupt our operations, and result in increased costs and loss of revenue. 32 Breaches of our information systems could adversely affect our reputation, disrupt our operations, and result in increased costs and loss of revenue. There have been an increasing number of cyber security incidents affecting companies around the world, which have caused operational failures or compromised sensitive or confidential corporate data. Although we do not believe our systems are at a greater risk of cyber security incidents than other similar organizations, such cyber security incidents may result in system disruptions or shutdowns; the loss or compromise of customer, financial, or operational data; loss of assets; disruption of billing, collections, or normal operating activities; disruption of electronic monitoring and control of operational systems; delays in financial reporting and other management functions; and the inability to access or rely upon critical business systems or records or other operational delays or issues. Although we do not believe our systems are at a greater risk of cyber security incidents than other similar organizations, such cyber security incidents may result in the loss or compromise of customer, financial, or operational data; loss of assets; disruption of billing, collections, or normal operating activities; disruption of electronic monitoring and control of operational systems; and delays in financial reporting and other management functions. Possible impacts associated with cyber security incidents (which generally are increasing in both frequency and sophistication) may include, among others, remediation costs related to lost, stolen, or compromised data; repairs to data processing systems; increased cyber security protection costs; reputational damage; lawsuits seeking damages; regulatory actions; and adverse effects on our compliance with applicable privacy and other laws and regulations. In the past we have experienced cyber security attacks and breaches, which, to date, have not had a material impact on our operations, but there can be no assurances that any further breach or disruption will not have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, or financial condition. If our efforts to protect the security of personal information related to any of our customers, consumers, vendors, or employees are unsuccessful and unauthorized access to that personal information is obtained, or we experience a significant disruption in our computer systems or a cyber security breach, we could experience an adverse effect on our operations, we could be subject to costly government enforcement action and private litigation, and our reputation could suffer. If our efforts to protect the security of personal information related to any of our customers, consumers, vendors, or employees are unsuccessful and unauthorized access to that personal information is obtained, or we experience a significant disruption in our computer systems or a cyber security breach, we could experience an adverse effect on our operations, we could be subject to costly government enforcement action and private litigation, and our reputation could suffer. Our operations involve the storage and transmission of proprietary information related to customers, consumers, vendors, and employees, such as credit card and bank account numbers, and security breaches could expose us to a risk of loss of this information, government enforcement action and litigation, and possible liability. Our payment services may be susceptible to credit card and other payment fraud schemes, including unauthorized use of credit cards, debit cards, bank account information, identity theft, and merchant fraud. If our security measures are breached as a result of third-party action, employee error, malfeasance, or otherwise, and as a result, someone obtains unauthorized access to data of our customers, consumers, vendors, or employees, our reputation may be damaged, our business may suffer, and we could incur significant liability. Because techniques used to obtain unauthorized access or to sabotage systems change frequently and generally are not recognized until launched against a target, we may be unable to anticipate these techniques or implement adequate preventative measures. If an actual or perceived breach of our security occurs, the public perception of the effectiveness of our security measures could be harmed and we could lose customers and consumers, which could adversely affect our business. Any breach of our data security or that of our service providers could result in an unauthorized release or transfer of customer, consumer, vendor, user, or employee information; cause the loss of valuable business data; or cause a disruption in our business. 42 Any breach of our data security or that of our service providers could result in an unauthorized release or transfer of customer, consumer, vendor, user, or employee information; cause the loss of valuable business data; or cause a disruption in our business. These events could give rise to unwanted media attention; damage our reputation; damage our customer, consumer, employee, vendor, or user relationships; and result in lost sales, fines, or lawsuits. We may also be required to expend significant capital and other resources to protect against or respond to or alleviate problems caused by a security breach, which could harm our operating results. If we or our independent service providers or business partners experience a breach of systems compromising our customers’ sensitive data, our brand could be harmed, sales of our products could decrease, and we could be exposed to losses, litigation, or regulatory proceedings. Depending on the nature of the information compromised, we may also have obligations to notify users, law enforcement, or payment companies about the incident and may need to provide some form of remedy, such as refunds, for the individuals affected by the incident. Actions of social activists could cause us to incur substantial costs, divert management’s attention and resources, and have an adverse effect on our business. Actions of social activists could cause us to incur substantial costs, divert management’s attention and resources, and have an adverse effect on our business. From time to time, we may be subject to informal private or public inquiries and/or formal proxy proposals by activists urging us to take certain corporate actions, many of which may not be aligned with the best financial or operational interests of our company. Such activities may adversely affect our business in a number of ways, since responding to such inquiries or proposals can be costly, time consuming, disruptive to our operations, and could 29 meaningfully divert the attention of our resources, including those of our management team and our employees. Such activities may adversely affect our business in a number of ways, since responding to such inquiries or proposals can be costly, time consuming, disruptive to our operations, and could meaningfully divert the attention of our resources, including those of our management team and our employees. For example, such activities could require us to retain the services of various professionals to advise us on such matters, including legal, financial, and communications advisors, which could be costly. In addition, certain stockholder inquiries and proposals could create perceived uncertainties or concerns as to our future operating environment, legislative environment, strategy direction, or leadership, and such uncertainties or concerns could result in the loss of potential business opportunities; could harm our ability to attract new investors, customers, and employees; could harm or disrupt our business and financial relationships; could result in consumer boycotts of our products; and could cause our stock price to experience periods of decline, volatility, or stagnation. For example, gun-control activists could pressure our financial institutions, our insurance carriers, our customers, our vendors, or other businesses and institutions with whom we maintain relationships to cease doing business with us or adopt actions that are not in the best interests of our company, inconsistent with the legal operations of our business, or contrary to the beliefs of our core consumers. In addition, our reputation could be irreparably damaged if our core consumers believe that we have adopted the gun control agenda of certain activists. Such activities could have a negative impact on our business, operating results, and financial condition. Risks Relating to Certain Business Matters and Securities Markets Our operating results may involve significant fluctuations. Various factors contribute to significant periodic and seasonal fluctuations in our operating results. These factors include the following: • market acceptance of our products, including new products; • market acceptance and new product introductions by our competitors; • the timing of large domestic and international orders; • cancellation of existing orders; • changes in our sales mix; • the cost of new product introductions; • problems with our supply chain; • the volume of customer orders relative to our capacity; • timing of expenditures in anticipation of future customer orders; • effectiveness in managing production processes and costs; • changes in cost and availability of labor and finished products, product components, and raw materials; • ability to manage inventory and inventory obsolescence; • pricing and other competitive pressures; • changes or anticipated changes in economic, social, political, legislative, and regulatory factors; • a material change in federal or state income tax regulations; • the outcome of any litigation; • adverse publicity surrounding our products, the safety of our products, or the use of our products; • changes in amount and or timing of our operating expenses; and • changes in laws and regulations that may affect the marketa