Risk Factors Dashboard

Once a year, publicly traded companies issue a comprehensive report of their business, called a 10-K. A component mandated in the 10-K is the ‘Risk Factors’ section, where companies disclose any major potential risks that they may face. This dashboard highlights all major changes and additions in new 10K reports, allowing investors to quickly identify new potential risks and opportunities.

Risk Factors - CPMD

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$CPMD Risk Factor changes from 00/04/15/22/2022 to 00/09/01/23/2023

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS. An investment in our common stock is highly speculative, involves a high degree of risk and should be made only by investors who can afford a complete loss. You should carefully consider the following risk factors, together with the other information in this report, including our financial statements and the related notes, before you decide to buy our common stock. If any of the following risks actually occurs, then our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially adversely affected, the trading of our common stock could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment therein. Risks Related to Our Company The Corporation is a Development Stage Company with Little Operating History of our Current Business, a History of Losses and the Corporation Cannot Assure Profitability. Risks Related to Our Company The Corporation is a Development Stage Company with Little Operating History, a History of Losses and the Corporation Cannot Assure Profitability. The Corporation’s business is comprised of a recently-acquired subsidiary. The Corporation has been incurring operating losses and cash flow deficits since the inception of such operations, as it attempts to create an infrastructure to capitalize on the opportunity for value creation that is emerging from the relaxing of prohibitions on the cannabis industry nationwide in Canada. The Corporation’s lack of operating history, and the lack of historical pro forma combined financial information for the Corporation and its acquired subsidiary, makes it difficult for investors to evaluate the Corporation’s prospects for success. Prospective investors should consider the risks and difficulties the Corporation might encounter, especially given the Corporation’s lack of an operating history or historical pro forma combined financial information, there is no assurance that the Corporation will be successful and the likelihood of success must be considered in light of its relatively early stage of operations. As the Corporation has not begun to generate revenue, it is extremely difficult to make accurate predictions and forecasts of its finances. This is compounded by the fact the Corporation intends to operate in the cannabis industry, which is rapidly transforming. There is no guarantee that the Corporation’s products or services will be attractive to potential consumers. Substantial Doubt About the Corporation’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern. The Corporation is in the development stage and is currently seeking additional capital, mergers, acquisitions, joint ventures, partnerships and other business arrangements to expand its product offerings in the medical cannabis industry and grow its revenue. The Corporation’s ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon its ability in the future to grow its revenue and achieve profitable operations and, in the meantime, to obtain the necessary financing to meet its obligations and repay its liabilities when they become due. External financing, predominantly by the issuance of equity and debt, will be sought to finance the operations of the Corporation; however, there can be no certainty that such funds will be available at terms acceptable to the Corporation. These conditions indicate the existence of material uncertainties that may cast significant doubt about the Corporation’s ability to continue as a going concern. 11 We have not generated any revenue or profit from operations since our inception. We have not generated any revenue or profit from operations since our inception. We expect that our operating expenses will increase over the next twelve months to continue our development activities. Based on our average monthly expenses and current burn rate of $100,000.00 per month, we estimate that our cash on hand will not be able to support our operations through the balance of this calendar year. This amount could increase if we encounter difficulties that we cannot anticipate at this time or if we acquire other businesses. Should this amount not be sufficient to support our continuing operations, we do not expect to be able to raise any additional capital through debt financing from traditional lending sources since we are not currently generating a profit from operations. Therefore, we only expect to raise money through equity financing via the sale of our common stock or equity-linked securities such as convertible debt. We are currently in discussions with a number of institutional investors who could provide the capital required for our ongoing operations. If we cannot raise the money that we need in order to continue to operate our business beyond the period indicated above, we will be forced to delay, scale back or eliminate some or all of our proposed operations. If any of these were to occur, there is a substantial risk that our business would fail. If we are unsuccessful in raising additional financing, we may need to curtail, discontinue, or cease operations. The Corporation had Negative Cash Flow for the for the Year Ended December 31, 2022 The Corporation had negative operating cash flow of $1,448,364 for the year ended December 31, 2022. 13 The Corporation had Negative Cash Flow for the for the Year Ended December 31, 2021 The Corporation had negative operating cash flow for the year ended December 31, 2021. To the extent that the Corporation has negative operating cash flow in future periods, it may need to allocate a portion of its cash reserves to fund such negative cash flow. The Corporation may also be required to raise additional funds through the issuance of equity or debt securities. There can be no assurance that the Corporation will be able to generate a positive cash flow from its operations, that additional capital or other types of financing will be available when needed or that these financings will be on terms favorable to the Corporation. The Corporation’s actual financial position and results of operations may differ materially from the expectations of the Corporation’s management. The Corporation’s Actual Financial Position and Results of Operations May Differ Materially from Management’s Expectations. The Corporation has experienced some changes in its operating plans and certain delays in its plans. As a result, the Corporation’s revenue, net income and cash flow may differ materially from the Corporation’s projected revenue, net income and cash flow. The process for estimating the Corporation’s revenue, net income and cash flow requires the use of in determining the appropriate assumptions and estimates. These estimates and assumptions may be revised as additional information becomes available and as additional analyses are performed. In addition, the assumptions used in planning may not prove to be accurate, and other factors may affect the Corporation’s financial condition or results of operations. The Corporation expects to incur significant ongoing costs and obligations related to its investment in infrastructure and growth and for regulatory compliance, which could have a material adverse impact on the Corporation’s results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. In addition, future changes in regulations, more vigorous enforcement thereof or other unanticipated events could require extensive changes to the Corporation’s operations, increased compliance costs or give rise to material liabilities, which could have a material adverse effect on the business, results of operations and financial condition of the Corporation. Our efforts to grow our business may be costlier than we expect, and we may not be able to increase our revenue enough to offset our higher operating expenses. We may incur significant losses in the future for a number of reasons, including the other risks described in this Prospectus, and unforeseen expenses, difficulties, complications and delays, and other unknown events. If we are unable to achieve and sustain profitability, the market price of our Common Stock may significantly decrease. If we are unable to achieve and sustain profitability, the market price of our Common Shares may significantly decrease. Limited Recourse Against the AMS Shareholders in AMS Acquisition. Investors in the Corporation will not have a direct statutory right or any other rights against the shareholders of AMS, the vendor of all of the shares of AMS to the Corporation. The sole remedy of the investors against such vendor will be through the Corporation bringing an action for a breach of the representations and warranties contained in the Securities Purchase Agreement between us and AMS (“AMS SPA”). The sole remedy of the investors against such vendor will be through the Corporation bringing an action for a breach of the representations and warranties contained in the SPA. While the Corporation is indemnified for breaches of representations and warranties contained in the AMS SPA, recourse for such breaches may be limited due to qualifications related to knowledge of the principal vendors, being Stephen Barber, John Ciotto, Joseph Groleau and Raymond Robertson, of the vendor (the “Principal Vendors”), contractual and time limits on recourse under applicable laws, and the ability of such Principal Vendors to satisfy third-party claims. While the Corporation is indemnified for breaches of representations and warranties contained in the SPA, recourse for such breaches may be limited due to qualifications related to knowledge of the principal vendors, being Stephen Barber, John Ciotto, Joseph Groleau and Raymond Robertson, of the vendor (the “Principal Vendors”), contractual and time limits on recourse under applicable laws, and the ability of such Principal Vendors to satisfy third-party claims. In particular, most of the representations and warranties under the AMS SPA had a survival period of only two years, thus our opportunity to bring claims for a breach of any of these representations and warranties has passed. The inability to recover fully any significant liabilities incurred with respect to breaches of representations and warranties under the AMS SPA may have adverse effects on the Corporation’s financial position. The inability to recover fully any significant liabilities incurred with respect to breaches of representations and warranties under the SPA may have adverse effects on the Corporation’s financial position. In addition, the Principal Vendors have not made any representation to the Corporation, and are not making any representation to investors, as to the disclosure in this filing constituting full, true and plain disclosure of all material facts related to the AMS Acquisition, or that this filing does not contain a misrepresentation with respect to such AMS Acquisition. In addition, the Principal Vendors have not made any representation to the Corporation, and are not making any representation to investors, as to the disclosure in this Prospectus constituting full, true and plain disclosure of all material facts related to the AMS Acquisition, or that this Prospectus does not contain a misrepresentation with respect to such AMS Acquisition. Accordingly, the Principal Vendors will not have any liability to investors if the disclosure in this filing relating to the AMS Acquisition does not meet such standard or contains a misrepresentation. Accordingly, the Principal Vendors will not have any liability to investors if the disclosure in this Prospectus relating to the AMS Acquisition does not meet such standard or contains a misrepresentation. 12 The Corporation is Reliant on the Obtention of the Licenses to Produce Medical Cannabis Products in Canada. 14 The Corporation is Reliant on the Obtention of the Licenses to Produce Medical Cannabis Products in Canada. The Corporation’s ability to grow, store and sell medical marijuana and cannabis oil in Canada is dependent on securing the appropriate licenses with Health Canada. Failure to comply with the requirements of any license application or failure to obtain the appropriate licenses with Health Canada would have a material adverse impact on the future business, financial condition and operating results of the Corporation. There can be no guarantees that Health Canada will issue the required Licenses. If and when the Licenses are issued, they will have to be periodically renewed by Health Canada. Although the Corporation believes it will meet the requirements of the Cannabis Act for future renewals of the Licenses, there can be no guarantee that Health Canada will renew the Licenses or, if renewed, that they will be renewed on the same or similar terms or that Health Canada will not revoke the Licenses. Should the Corporation fail to comply with the requirements of the Licenses or should Health Canada not renew the Licenses when required, or renew the Licenses on different terms or revoke the Licenses, there would be a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s business, financial condition and results of operations. Government licenses are currently, and in the future may be, required in connection with the Corporation’s operations, in addition to other unknown permits and approvals which may be required. To the extent such permits and approvals are required and not obtained, the Corporation may be prevented from operating and/or expanding its business, which could have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s business, financial condition and results of operations. The Corporation is Subject to Changes in Canadian Laws, Regulations and Guidelines Which Could Adversely Affect the Corporation’s Future Business, Financial Condition and Results of Operations. On October 17, 2018, the Canadian federal government legalized the production, distribution and sale of recreational cannabis for adult use under the Cannabis Act (see “Industry and Regulatory Overview”). No legal market previously existed for adult recreational use cannabis in Canada. For this reason, projections for both short and long-term market conditions for the retail of cannabis remain uncertain. The Corporation’s operations will be subject to various laws, regulations and guidelines relating to the manufacture, management, packaging/labeling, advertising, sale, transportation, storage and disposal of medical and recreational cannabis but also including laws and regulations relating to drugs, controlled substances, health and safety, the conduct of operations and the protection of the environment. Changes to such laws, regulations and guidelines due to matters beyond the control of the Corporation may cause material adverse effects to the business, financial condition and results of operations of the Corporation. The Corporation endeavors to comply with all relevant laws, regulations and guidelines. To the best of the Corporation’s knowledge, the Corporation is in compliance or in the process of being assessed for compliance with all such laws, regulations and guidelines as described elsewhere in this Prospectus. To date, only fresh cannabis, dried cannabis and cannabis oil products are permitted. Health Canada has given guidance that other transformed products (primarily edibles and beverages infused with cannabis) will be permitted for legal sale one year subsequent to the Cannabis Act coming into effect. However, there is uncertainty regarding how and when certain regulatory changes will be implemented. Further, the general legislation framework pertaining to the Canadian recreational cannabis market is subject to significant provincial and territorial regulation, which varies across provinces and territories. Unfavorable regulatory changes, delays or both may therefore materially and adversely affect the future business, financial condition and results of operations of the Corporation. The Corporation May not Be Able to Develop Its Brands, Products and Services, Which Could Prevent It from Ever Becoming Profitable. If the Corporation cannot successfully develop, manufacture and distribute its products, or if the Corporation experiences difficulties in the development process, such as capacity constraints, quality control problems or other disruptions, the Corporation may not be able to develop market-ready commercial products at acceptable costs, which would adversely affect the Corporation’s ability to effectively enter the market. A failure by the Corporation to achieve a low-cost structure through economies of scale or improvements in cultivation and manufacturing processes would have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s commercialization plans and the Corporation’s business, prospects, results of operations and financial condition. 13 There is No Assurance That the Corporation Will Turn a Profit or Generate Immediate Revenues. 15 There is No Assurance That the Corporation Will Turn a Profit or Generate Immediate Revenues. There is no assurance that we will ever be profitable, earn revenues, or pay dividends. There is no assurance as to whether the Corporation will be profitable, earn revenues, or pay dividends. The Corporation has incurred and anticipates that it will continue to incur substantial expenses relating to the development and initial operations of its business. The payment and amount of any future dividends will depend upon, among other things, the Corporation’s results of operations, cash flow, financial condition, and operating and capital requirements. There is no assurance that future dividends will be paid, and, if dividends are paid, there is no assurance with respect to the amount of any such dividends. Further, the Corporation has several classes of preferred stock with dividend rights that take a priority over our common stock with respect to payment of any dividends. As such, common stockholders should not expect any dividends to be paid indefinitely. No Assurance of Sustainable Revenues. There can be no assurance that our subsidiaries will generate sufficient and sustainable revenues to enable us to operate at profitable levels or to generate positive cash flow. As a result of our limited operating history in the cannabis market and the nature of the markets in which we compete, we may not be able to accurately predict our revenues. As a result of our limited operating history and the nature of the markets in which we compete, we may not be able to accurately predict our revenues. Any failure by us to accurately make such predictions could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, and financial condition. Further, our current and future expense levels are based largely on our investment plans and estimates of future revenues. We expect operating results to fluctuate significantly in the future as a result of a variety of factors, many of which are outside of our control. Factors that may adversely affect our operating results include, among others, demand for our products and services, the budgeting cycles of potential customers, lack of enforcement of or changes in governmental regulations or laws, the amount and timing of capital expenditures and other costs relating to the expansion of our operations, the introduction of new or enhanced products and services by us or our competitors, the timing and number of new hires, changes in our pricing policy or those of our competitors, the mix of our products, increases in the cost of raw materials, technical difficulties with the products, incurrence of costs relating to future acquisitions, general economic conditions, and market acceptance of our products. As a strategic response to changes in the competitive environment, we may, from time to time, make certain decisions regarding pricing, service, marketing or business combinations that could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, and financial condition. Any seasonality is likely to cause quarterly fluctuations in our operating results, and there can be no assurance that such patterns will not have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, and financial condition. We may be unable to adjust spending in a timely manner to compensate for any unexpected revenue shortfall. Operating results may fluctuate and may fall below expectations in any fiscal quarter. While we have historically posted losses from our operating activities, as we grow our business and implement our business plan, our future operating results are difficult to predict and are expected to fluctuate from quarter to quarter due to a variety of factors, many of which are outside of our control. As a result, comparing our operating results on a period-to-period basis may not be meaningful, and investors should not rely on our past results or on predictions prepared by us to determine future performance. The Corporation May not Be Able to Effectively Manage Its Growth and Operations, Which Could Materially and Adversely Affect Its Business. The Corporation has previously attempted to grow by acquisition. The Corporation has grown by acquisition. If the Corporation implements its business plan as intended, it may in the future experience rapid growth and development in a relatively short period of time. The management of this growth will require, among other things, continued development of the Corporation’s financial and management controls and management information systems, stringent control of costs, the ability to attract and retain qualified management personnel and the training of new personnel. The Corporation intends to utilize outsourced resources, and hire additional personnel, to manage its expected growth and expansion. Failure to successfully manage its possible growth and development could have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s business and the value of the Common Stock. 14 While a major part of our business strategy is to pursue strategic acquisitions, we may not be able to identify businesses for which we can obtain necessary financing to acquire on acceptable terms, face risks due to additional indebtedness, and our acquisition strategy may incur significant costs or expose us to substantial risks inherent in the acquired business’s operations. 16 While a major part of our business strategy is to pursue strategic acquisitions, we may not be able to identify businesses for which we can obtain necessary financing to acquire on acceptable terms, face risks due to additional indebtedness, and our acquisition strategy may incur significant costs or expose us to substantial risks inherent in the acquired business’s operations. Our strategy of pursuing strategic acquisitions may be negatively impacted by several risks, including the following: Any Future Acquisitions Could Disrupt Business. If we are successful in consummating acquisitions, those acquisitions could subject us to a number of risks, including that: 15 These factors could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and operating results. The Corporation May not Be Able to Identify and/or Consummate Acquisitions with Strategic Targets. As part of its corporate strategy, the Corporation intends to continue a focus on the acquisition of additional companies operating in jurisdictions where cannabis is legal on a national basis. The Corporation’s focus is initially on Canadian Licensed Producers of marijuana but may extend to other cannabis-related products. If and when cannabis becomes legal in other foreign jurisdictions the Corporation will research acquisition or development opportunities. The Corporation intends to target opportunities which are revenue generating or will be in the immediate future, low-cost producers and either profitable or nearing profitability. There can be no guarantee that the Corporation will identify such opportunities, or once identified, consummate such transactions. Failure to find suitable acquisitions or joint venture opportunities will require us to grow our business entirely organically which can be more costly and delay the timeline of our future growth and development. The Corporation May Be Unable to Adequately Protect Its Proprietary and Intellectual Property Rights. The Corporation May Be Unable to Adequately Protect Its Proprietary and Intellectual Property Rights. The Company currently has no proprietary or intellectual property. The Corporation’s ability to compete may depend on the superiority, uniqueness and value of any intellectual property and technology that it may develop in the future. To the extent the Corporation is able to do so, to protect any proprietary rights of the Corporation, the Corporation intends to rely on a combination of patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret laws, confidentiality agreements with its employees and third parties, and protective contractual provisions. Despite these efforts, any of the following occurrences may reduce the value of any of the Corporation’s intellectual property: 16 We may not be able to protect intellectual property that we hope to acquire, which could adversely affect our business. Despite these efforts, any of the following occurrences may reduce the value of any of the Corporation’s intellectual property: • the market for the Corporation’s products and services may depend to a significant extent upon the goodwill associated with its trademarks and trade names, and its ability to register its intellectual property under U. The companies that we hope to acquire may rely on patent, trademark, trade secret, and copyright protection to protect their technology. We believe that technological leadership can be achieved through additional factors such as the technological and creative skills of our personnel, new product developments, frequent product enhancements, name recognition, and reliable product maintenance. Nevertheless, our ability to compete effectively depends in part on our ability to develop and maintain proprietary aspects of our technology, such as patents. We may not secure future patents; and patents that we may secure may become invalid or may not provide meaningful protection for our product innovations. In addition, the laws of some foreign countries do not protect intellectual property rights to the same extent as the United States or Canada. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that competitors will not independently develop similar products, "reverse engineer" our products, or, if patents are issued to us, design around such patents. We also expect to rely upon a combination of copyright, trademark, trade secret, and other intellectual property laws to protect our proprietary rights by entering into confidentiality agreements with our employees, consultants, and vendors, and by controlling access to and distribution of our technology, documentation and other proprietary information. There can be no assurance, however, that the steps to be taken by us will not be challenged, invalidated, or circumvented, or that the rights granted thereunder will provide a competitive advantage to us. Any such circumstance could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. While we are not currently engaged in any intellectual property litigation or proceedings, there can be no assurance that we will not become so involved in the future or that our products do not infringe any intellectual property or other proprietary right of any third party. Such litigation could result in substantial costs, the diversion of resources and personnel, and significant liabilities to third parties, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business. We may not be able to protect our trade names and domain names. We may not be able to protect our trade names and domain names against all infringers, which could decrease the value of our brand name and proprietary rights. We currently hold the Internet domain name CannaPharmaRx.com Domain names generally are regulated by Internet regulatory bodies are subject to change, and in some cases, may be superseded, in some cases by-laws, rules and regulations governing the registration of trade names and trademarks with the United States Patent and Trademark Office as well as ascertain other common law rights. If the domain registrars are changed, if new ones are created, or if we are deemed to be infringing upon another's trade name or trademark, we may be unable to prevent third parties from acquiring or using, as the case may be, our domain name, trade names or trademarks, which could adversely affect our brand name and other proprietary rights. The Corporation May Be Forced to Litigate to Enforce or Defend Its Intellectual Property Rights, to Protect Its Trade Secrets or to Determine the Validity and Scope of Other Parties’ Proprietary Rights. If we successfully procure patents or other intellectual property for our products and processes, we may be forced to litigate to protect such intellectual property. Any such litigation could be very costly and could distract its management from focusing on operating the Corporation’s business and divert resources from growing our business and implementing our business plan. The existence and/or outcome of any such litigation could harm the Corporation’s business. Further, because the content of much of the Corporation’s intellectual property concerns cannabis and other activities that are not legal in some state jurisdictions or under U.S. federal law, the Corporation may face additional difficulties in defending its intellectual property rights. The Corporation may become subject to litigation, including for possible product liability claims, which may have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s reputation, business, results from operations, and financial condition. The Corporation may be named as a defendant in a lawsuit or regulatory action. The Corporation may also incur uninsured losses for liabilities which arise in the ordinary course of business, or which are unforeseen, including, but not limited to, employment liability and business loss claims. Any such losses could have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s business, results of operations, sales, cash flow or financial condition. Further, the administration of medical substances to humans can result in product liability claims by consumers. Product liability claims can be expensive, difficult to defend and may result in large judgments or settlements against the Corporation. The Corporation may not be able to obtain or maintain adequate insurance or other protection against potential liabilities arising from product sales. Product liability claims could also result in negative perception of the Corporation’s products or other reputational damage which could have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s business, results of operations, sales, cash flow or financial condition. 17 The Corporation’s Operations are Subject to Environmental Regulation in the Various Jurisdictions in Which It Operates. 19 The Corporation’s Operations are Subject to Environmental Regulation in the Various Jurisdictions in Which It Operates. These regulations mandate, among other things, the maintenance of air and water quality standards and land reclamation. They also set forth limitations on the generation, transportation, storage and disposal of solid and hazardous waste. Environmental legislation is evolving in a manner which will require stricter standards and enforcement, increased fines and penalties for non-compliance, more stringent environmental assessments of proposed projects and a heightened degree of responsibility for companies and their officers, directors and employees. There is no assurance that future changes in environmental regulation, if any, will not adversely affect the Corporation’s operations. Government environmental approvals and permits are currently, and may in the future be required in connection with the Corporation’s operations. To the extent such approvals are required and not obtained, the Corporation may be curtailed or prohibited from its proposed business activities or from proceeding with the development of its operations as currently proposed. Failure to comply with applicable environmental laws, regulations and permitting requirements may result in enforcement actions thereunder, including orders issued by regulatory or judicial authorities causing operations to cease or be curtailed, and may include corrective measures requiring capital expenditures, installation of additional equipment, or remedial actions. The Corporation may be required to compensate those suffering loss or damage due to its operations and may have civil or criminal fines or penalties imposed for violations of applicable laws or regulations. The Corporation Faces Competition from Other Companies Where It Will Conduct Business That May Have Higher Capitalization, More Experienced Management or May Be More Mature As a Business. An increase in the companies competing in this industry could limit the ability of the Corporation to expand its operations. Current and new competitors may be better capitalized, have longer operating history, more expertise and ability to develop higher quality equipment or products, at the same or a lower cost. Current and new competitors may be better capitalized, longer operating history, more expertise and ability to develop higher quality equipment or products, at the same or a lower cost. The Corporation cannot provide assurances that it will be able to compete successfully against current and future competitors. Competitive pressures faced by the Corporation could have a material adverse effect on its business, operating results and financial condition. In addition, despite Canadian federal and state-level legalization of marijuana, illicit or “black-market” operations remain abundant and present substantial competition to the Corporation. In particular, illicit operations, despite being largely clandestine, are not required to comply with the extensive regulations that the Corporation must comply with to conduct business, and accordingly may have significantly lower costs of operation. This makes their product more profitable and provides them the ability to sale their product at a lower cost than we can, thereby reducing our profitability. If the Corporation is Unable to Attract and Retain Key Personnel, It May not Be Able to Compete Effectively in the Cannabis Market. The Corporation’s success has depended and continues to depend upon its ability to attract and retain key management, including the Corporation’s President/CEO, technical experts and sales personnel. The Corporation will attempt to enhance its management and technical expertise by continuing to recruit qualified individuals who possess desired skills and experience in certain targeted areas. The Corporation’s inability to retain employees and attract and retain sufficient additional employees or engineering and technical support resources could have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s business, results of operations, sales, cash flow or financial condition. Shortages in qualified personnel or the loss of key personnel could adversely affect the financial condition of the Corporation, results of operations of the business and could limit the Corporation’s ability to develop and market its cannabis-related products. The loss of any of the Corporation’s senior management or key employees could materially adversely affect the Corporation’s ability to execute our business plan and strategy, and the Corporation may not be able to find adequate replacements on a timely basis, or at all. If we are unable to keep up with technological developments, our business could be negatively affected. The markets for our products and services are expected to be characterized by rapid technological change and be highly competitive with respect to timely innovations. Accordingly, we believe that our ability to succeed in the sale of our products and services will depend significantly upon the technological quality of our products and services relative to those of our competitors, and upon our ability to continue to develop and introduce new and enhanced products and services at competitive prices and in a timely and cost-effective manner. In order to develop such new products and services, we will depend upon close relationships with existing customers and our ability to continue to develop and introduce new and enhanced products and services at competitive prices and in a timely and cost-effective manner and grow the markets that we offer these products and services. In order to develop such new products and services, we will depend upon close relationships with existing customers and our ability to continue to develop and introduce new and enhanced products and services at competitive prices and in a timely and cost-effective manner. There can be no assurance that we will be able to develop and market our products and services successfully or respond effectively to the technological changes or new product and service offerings of our potential competitors. We may not be able to develop the required technologies, products, and services on a cost-effective and timely basis, and any inability to do so could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. 18 Failure to Successfully Integrate Acquired Businesses, Its Products and Other Assets into the Corporation, or If Integrated, Failure to Further the Corporation’s Business Strategy, May Result in the Corporation’s Inability to Realize Any Benefit from Such Acquisition. Failure to Successfully Integrate Acquired Businesses, Its Products and Other Assets into the Corporation, or If Integrated, Failure to Further the Corporation’s Business Strategy, May Result in the Corporation’s Inability to Realize Any Benefit from Such Acquisition. The consummation and integration of any acquired business, product or other assets into the Corporation may be complex and time-consuming and, if such businesses and assets are not successfully integrated, the Corporation may not achieve the anticipated benefits, cost-savings or growth opportunities. Furthermore, these acquisitions and other arrangements, even if successfully integrated, may fail to further the Corporation’s business strategy as anticipated, expose the Corporation to increased competition or other challenges with respect to the Corporation’s products or geographic markets, and expose the Corporation to additional liabilities associated with an acquired business, technology or other asset or arrangement. When the Corporation acquires cannabis businesses, it may obtain the rights to applications for licenses as well as licenses; however, the procurement of such applications for licenses and licenses generally will be subject to governmental and regulatory approval. There are no guarantees that the Corporation will successfully consummate such acquisitions, and even if the Corporation consummates such acquisitions, the procurement of applications for licenses may never result in the grant of a license by any state or local governmental or regulatory agency and the transfer of any rights to licenses may never be approved by the applicable state and/or local governmental or regulatory agency. The Size of the Corporation’s Target Market is Difficult to Quantify and Investors Will Be Reliant on Their Own Estimates on the Accuracy of Market Data. Because the cannabis industry is in a nascent stage with uncertain boundaries, there is a lack of information about comparable companies available for potential investors to review in deciding about whether to invest in the Corporation and, few, if any, established companies whose business model the Corporation can follow or upon whose success the Corporation can build. Accordingly, investors will have to rely on their own estimates in deciding whether to invest in the Corporation. There can be no assurance that the Corporation’s estimates are accurate or that the market size is sufficiently large for its business to grow as projected, which may negatively impact its financial results. The Corporation’s Industry is Experiencing Rapid Growth and Consolidation That May Cause the Corporation to Lose Key Relationships and Intensify Competition. 21 The Corporation’s Industry is Experiencing Rapid Growth and Consolidation That May Cause the Corporation to Lose Key Relationships and Intensify Competition. The cannabis industry is undergoing rapid growth and substantial change, which has resulted in an increase in competitors, consolidation and formation of strategic relationships. Acquisitions or other consolidating transactions could harm the Corporation in a number of ways, including by losing strategic partners if they are acquired by or enter into relationships with a competitor, losing customers, revenue and market share, or forcing the Corporation to expend greater resources to meet new or additional competitive threats, all of which could harm the Corporation’s operating results. As competitors enter the market and become increasingly sophisticated, competition in the Corporation’s industry may intensify and place downward pressure on retail prices for its products and services, which could negatively impact its profitability. The Corporation Will Require Additional Financing and There is No Assurance That Additional Financing Will Be Available When Required. The Corporation will require additional capital in the future and plans to achieve this additional financing through equity and/ or debt financing. However, there is no assurance that this financing will be available when required. Specifically, there is no assurance that the Corporation will be able to raise any additional equity financing through its shares. In addition, there is no assurance that the Corporation will be able to secure debt financing given its low asset base and its current lack of revenues. Even if we are able to raise additional financing, this financing may not be available at attractive terms meaning we either will have to forego certain plans or incur financial obligations on less than favorable terms. Existing Shareholders May Be Diluted to the Extent That the Company Raises Additional Funds Through Additional Equity Financings. The Corporation continues to sell shares and issue notes convertible into shares for cash to fund operations, capital expansion, mergers and acquisitions that will dilute the current shareholders. The Corporation continues to sell shares for cash to fund operations, capital expansion, mergers and acquisitions that will dilute the current shareholders. There is no guarantee that the Corporation will be able to achieve its business objectives. The continued development of the Corporation will require additional financing. The failure to raise such capital could result in the delay or indefinite postponement of current business objectives or the Corporation going out of business. There can be no assurance that additional capital or other types of financing will be available if needed or that, if available, the terms of such financing will be favorable to the Corporation. 19 If additional funds are raised through issuances of equity or convertible debt securities, existing shareholders will suffer dilution, which in some cases may be significant, and any new equity securities issued could have rights, preferences and privileges superior to those of holders of Common Stock. If additional funds are raised through issuances of equity or convertible debt securities, existing shareholders could suffer significant dilution, and any new equity securities issued could have rights, preferences and privileges superior to those of holders of Common Shares. The Corporation’s articles permit the issuance of 300,000,000 shares of Common Stock, and shareholders will have no preemptive rights in connection with such further issuance. The Corporation’s articles permit the issuance of 300,000,000 Common Shares, and shareholders will have no preemptive rights in connection with such further issuance. The directors of the Corporation have discretion to determine the price and the terms of further issuances. In addition, from time to time, the Corporation may enter into transactions to acquire assets or the shares of other companies. These transactions may be financed wholly or partially with debt, which may temporarily increase the Corporation’s debt levels above industry standards. Any debt financing secured in the future could involve restrictive covenants relating to capital raising activities and other financial and operational matters, which may make it more difficult for the Corporation to obtain additional capital and to pursue business opportunities, including potential acquisitions. The Corporation may require additional financing to fund its operations to the point where it is generating positive cash flow. Negative cash flow may restrict the Corporation’s ability to pursue its business objectives. The Corporation Operates Within the Cannabis Industry, Which Might Result in Additional Difficulties and Complexities Associated with Obtaining Adequate Insurance Coverage. At the date of this Report, the Corporation and its subsidiaries have secured insurance coverage with respect to builder’s risk, general liability and property. The Corporation has not yet secured insurance coverage with respect to workers’ compensation, directors’ and officers’ insurance, fire and other similar policies customarily obtained for businesses to the extent commercially appropriate; and, because the Corporation is engaged in and operates within the cannabis industry, there might be exclusions and additional difficulties and complexities associated with obtaining such insurance coverage that could cause the Corporation to suffer uninsured losses, which could adversely affect the Corporation’s business, results of operations, and profitability. There is no assurance that the Corporation will be able to obtain and utilize such insurance coverage, if necessary. The Cultivation of Cannabis Includes Risks Inherent in an Agricultural Business Including the Risk of Crop Loss, Sudden Changes in Environmental Conditions, Equipment Failure, Product Recalls and Others. 22 The Cultivation of Cannabis Includes Risks Inherent in an Agricultural Business Including the Risk of Crop Loss, Sudden Changes in Environmental Conditions, Equipment Failure, Product Recalls and Others. The Corporation’s future business involves the growing of medical marijuana, an agricultural product. Such business will be subject to the risks inherent in the agricultural business, such as insects, plant diseases and similar agricultural risks. Although the Corporation expects that any such growing will be completed indoors under climate controlled conditions, there can be no assurance that natural elements will not have a material adverse effect on any such future production. The Corporation is reliant on a single location. Adverse changes affecting the Hanover Facility, development project could materially affect the Corporation’s plans. The Cultivation of Cannabis Involves a Reliance on Third Party Transportation Which Could Result in Supply Delays, Reliability of Delivery and Other Related Risks. In order for customers of the Corporation to receive their product, the Corporation may rely on third party transportation services. This can cause logistical problems with and delays in patients obtaining their orders and cannot be directly controlled by the Corporation. Any delay by third party transportation services may adversely affect the Corporation’s financial performance. Moreover, security of the product during transportation to and from the Corporation’s facilities is critical due to the nature of the product. A breach of security during transport could have material adverse effects on the Corporation’s business, financials and prospects. Any such breach could impact the Corporation’s future ability to continue operating under its licenses or the prospect of renewing its licenses. 20 The Corporation May Be Subject to Product Recalls for Product Defects Self-imposed or Imposed by Regulators. The Corporation May Be Subject to Product Recalls for Product Defects Self-imposed or Imposed by Regulators. Manufacturers and distributors of products are sometimes subject to the recall or return of their products for a variety of reasons, including product defects, such as contamination, unintended harmful side effects or interactions with other substances, packaging safety and inadequate or inaccurate labeling disclosure. If any of the Corporation’s products are recalled due to an alleged product defect or for any other reason, the Corporation could be required to incur the unexpected expense of the recall and any legal proceedings that might arise in connection with the recall. The Corporation may lose a significant amount of sales and may not be able to replace those sales at an acceptable margin or at all. In addition, a product recall may require significant management attention. Although the Corporation has detailed procedures in place for testing its products, there can be no assurance that any quality, potency or contamination problems will be detected in time to avoid unforeseen product recalls, regulatory action or lawsuits. Additionally, if one of the Corporation’s significant brands were subject to recall, the image of that brand and the Corporation would likely be harmed. A recall for any of the foregoing reasons would likely lead to decreased demand for the Corporation’s products and could have a material adverse effect on the results of operations and financial condition of the Corporation. A recall for any of the foregoing reasons could lead to decreased demand for the Corporation’s products and could have a material adverse effect on the results of operations and financial condition of the Corporation. Additionally, product recalls may lead to increased scrutiny of the Corporation’s operations by Health Canada or other regulatory agencies, requiring further management attention and potential legal fees and other expenses. The Corporation is Reliant on Key Inputs, such as Water and Utilities, and Any Interruption of These Services Could Have a Material Adverse Effect on the Corporation’s Finances and Operation Results. The Corporation’s business is dependent on a number of key inputs and their related costs including raw materials and supplies related to its growing operations, as well as electricity, water and other local utilities. Any significant interruption or negative change in the availability or economics of the supply chain for key inputs could materially impact the business, financial condition and operating results of the Corporation. Any inability to secure required supplies and services or to do so on appropriate terms could have a materially adverse impact on the business, financial condition and operating results of the Corporation. The Expansion of the Medical Cannabis Industry May Require New Clinical Research into Effective Medical Therapies, When Such Research has Been Restricted in the U. 23 The Expansion of the Medical Cannabis Industry May Require New Clinical Research into Effective Medical Therapies, When Such Research has Been Restricted in the U. S. and is New to Canada. Research in Canada, the U.S. and internationally regarding the medical benefits, viability, safety, efficacy, dosing and social acceptance of cannabis or isolated cannabinoids remains in early stages. There have been relatively few clinical trials on the benefits of cannabis or isolated cannabinoids. Although the Corporation believes that the articles, reports and studies support its beliefs regarding the medical benefits, viability, safety, efficacy, dosing and social acceptance of cannabis, future research and clinical trials may prove such statements to be incorrect, or could raise concerns regarding, and perceptions relating to, cannabis. Given these risks, uncertainties and assumptions, investors should not place undue reliance on such articles and reports. Future research studies and clinical trials may draw opposing conclusions to those stated in this Prospectus or reach negative conclusions regarding the medical benefits, viability, safety, efficacy, dosing, social acceptance or other facts and perceptions related to medical cannabis, which could have a material adverse effect on the demand for the Corporation’s products with the potential to lead to a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s business, financial condition and results of operations. Under Canadian Regulations, a Licensed Producer of Cannabis May Have Restrictions on the Type and Form of Marketing It Can Undertake Which Could Materially Impact Sales Performance. The development of the Corporation’s future business and operating results may be hindered by applicable restrictions on sales and marketing activities imposed by Health Canada or U.S. regulatory authorities. The regulatory environment in Canada limits the Corporation’s ability to compete for market share in a manner similar to other industries. If the Corporation is unable to effectively market its products and compete for market share, or if the costs of compliance with government legislation and regulation cannot be absorbed through increased selling prices for its products, the Corporation’s sales and operating results could be adversely affected. 21 The Corporation Could Be Liable for Fraudulent or Illegal Activity by its Employees, Contractors and Consultants Resulting in Significant Financial Losses to Claims Against the Corporation. The Corporation Could Be Liable for Fraudulent or Illegal Activity by its Employees, Contractors and Consultants Resulting in Significant Financial Losses to Claims Against the Corporation. The Corporation is exposed to the risk that its employees, independent contractors and consultants may engage in fraudulent or other illegal activity. Misconduct by these parties could include intentional, reckless and/or negligent conduct or disclosure of unauthorized activities to the Corporation that violates: (i) government regulations; (ii) manufacturing standards; (iii) federal and provincial healthcare fraud and abuse laws and regulations; or (iv) laws that require the true, complete and accurate reporting of financial information or data. It is not always possible for the Corporation to identify and deter misconduct by its employees and other third parties, and the precautions taken by the Corporation to detect and prevent this activity may not be effective in controlling unknown or unmanaged risks or losses or in protecting the Corporation from governmental investigations or other actions or lawsuits stemming from a failure to be in compliance with such laws or regulations. If any such actions are instituted against the Corporation, and it is not successful in defending itself or asserting its rights, those actions could have a significant impact on our business, including the imposition of civil, criminal and administrative penalties, damages, monetary fines, contractual damages, reputational harm, diminished profits and future earnings, and curtailment of the Corporation’s operations, any of which could have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s business, financial condition and results of operations. The Corporation will be reliant on Information Technology Systems and may be Subject to Damaging Cyber-attacks. The Corporation has entered into agreements with third parties for hardware, software, telecommunications and other information technology (“IT”) services in connection with its operations. The Corporation’s operations depend, in part, on how well it and its suppliers protect networks, equipment, IT systems and software against damage from a number of threats, including, but not limited to, cable cuts, damage to physical plants, natural disasters, intentional damage and destruction, fire, power loss, hacking, computer viruses, vandalism and theft. The Corporation’s operations also depend on the timely maintenance, upgrade and replacement of networks, equipment, IT systems and software, as well as preemptive expenses to mitigate the risks of failures. Any of these and other events could result in information system failures, delays and/or increase in capital expenditures. The failure of information systems or a component of information systems could, depending on the nature of any such failure, adversely impact the Corporation’s reputation and results of operations. The Corporation has not experienced any material losses to date relating to cyber-attacks or other information security breaches, but there can be no assurance that the Corporation will not incur such losses in the future. 24 The Corporation has not experienced any material losses to date relating to cyber-attacks or other information security breaches, but there can be no assurance that the Corporation will not incur such losses in the future. The Corporation’s risk and exposure to these matters cannot be fully mitigated because of, among other things, the evolving nature of these threats. As a result, cyber security and the continued development and enhancement of controls, processes and practices designed to protect systems, computers, software, data and networks from attack, damage or unauthorized access is a priority. As cyber threats continue to evolve, the Corporation may be required to expend additional resources to continue to modify or enhance protective measures or to investigate and remediate any security vulnerabilities. The Corporation may be Subject to Breaches of Security at its Facilities, or in Respect of Electronic Documents and Data Storage and May Face Risks Related to Breaches of Applicable Privacy Laws. Given the nature of the Corporation’s product and its lack of legal availability outside of channels approved by the Government of Canada, as well as the concentration of inventory in its facilities, despite meeting or exceeding Health Canada’s security requirements, there remains a risk of shrinkage as well as theft. A security breach at one of the Corporation’s facilities could expose the Corporation to additional liability and to potentially costly litigation, increase expenses relating to the resolution and future prevention of these breaches and may deter potential patients from choosing the Corporation’s products. A privacy breach may occur through procedural or process failure, information technology malfunction, or deliberate unauthorized intrusions. Theft of data for competitive purposes, particularly patient lists and preferences, is an ongoing risk whether perpetrated via employee collusion or negligence or through deliberate cyber-attack. Any such theft or privacy breach would have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s business, financial condition and results of operations. 22 In addition, there are a number of federal and provincial laws protecting the confidentiality of certain patient health information, including patient records, and restricting the use and disclosure of that protected information. In addition, there are a number of federal and provincial laws protecting the confidentiality of certain patient health information, including patient records, and restricting the use and disclosure of that protected information. In particular, the privacy rules under the Personal Information Protection and Electronics Documents Act (Canada) (“PIPEDA”), protect medical records and other personal health information by limiting their use and disclosure of health information to the minimum level reasonably necessary to accomplish the intended purpose. If the Corporation was found to be in violation of the privacy or security rules under PIPEDA or other laws protecting the confidentiality of patient health information, it could be subject to sanctions and civil or criminal penalties, which could increase its liabilities, harm its reputation and have a material adverse effect on the business, results of operations and financial condition of the Corporation. The Corporation’s Officers and Directors may be Engaged in a Range of Business Activities Resulting in Conflicts of Interest. The Corporation may be subject to various potential conflicts of interest because some of its officers and directors may be engaged in a range of business activities. In addition, the Corporation’s executive officers and directors may devote time to their outside business interests, so long as such activities do not materially or adversely interfere with their duties to the Corporation. In some cases, the Corporation’s executive officers and directors may have fiduciary obligations associated with these business interests that interfere with their ability to devote time to the Corporation’s business and affairs and that could adversely affect the Corporation’s operations. These business interests could require significant time and attention of the Corporation’s executive officers and directors. In addition, the Corporation may also become involved in other transactions which conflict with the interests of its directors and the officers who may from time to time deal with persons, firms, institutions or companies with which the Corporation may be dealing, or which may be seeking investments similar to those desired by it. The interests of these persons could conflict with those of the Corporation. In addition, from time to time, these persons may be competing with the Corporation for available investment opportunities. conflicts of interest, if any, will be subject to the procedures and remedies provided under applicable laws. Conflicts of interest, if any, will be subject to the procedures and remedies provided under applicable laws. In particular, if such a conflict of interest arises at a meeting of the Corporation’s directors, a director who has such a conflict will abstain from voting for or against the approval of such participation or such terms. In accordance with applicable laws, the directors of the Corporation are required to act honestly, in good faith and in the best interests of the Corporation. Regulatory Scrutiny of the Corporation’s Industry may Negatively Impact its Ability to Raise Additional Capital. The Corporation’s business activities rely on newly established and/or developing laws and regulations in Canada and other jurisdictions in which we intend to operate. The Corporation’s business activities rely on newly established and/or developing laws and regulations in Canada. These laws and regulations are rapidly evolving and subject to change with minimal notice. Regulatory changes may adversely affect the Corporation’s profitability or cause it to cease operations entirely. The cannabis industry may come under the scrutiny or further scrutiny by Health Canada, the SEC. The cannabis industry may come under the scrutiny or further scrutiny by Health Canada or the Canadian Securities Exchange. It is impossible to determine the extent of the impact of any new laws, regulations or initiatives that may be proposed, or whether any proposals will become law. The regulatory uncertainty surrounding the Corporation’s industry may adversely affect the business and operations of the Corporation, including without limitation, the costs to remain compliant with applicable laws and the impairment of its ability to raise additional capital, which could reduce, delay or eliminate any return on investment in the Corporation. Publicity or Consumer Perception. The Corporation believes the recreational and medical cannabis industries are highly dependent upon consumer perception regarding the safety, efficacy and quality of the cannabis produced. Consumer perception of the Corporation’s products can be significantly influenced by scientific research or findings, regulatory investigations, litigation, media attention and other publicity regarding the consumption of cannabis products. There can be no assurance that future scientific research, findings, regulatory proceedings, litigation, media attention or other research findings or publicity will be favorable to the cannabis market generally, any particular product or consistent with earlier publicity. Future research reports, findings, regulatory proceedings, litigation, media attention or other publicity that are perceived as less favorable than, or that question, earlier research reports, findings or publicity could have a material adverse effect on the demand for the Corporation’s products and the business, results of operations, financial condition and the Corporation’s cash flows. The Corporation’s dependence upon consumer perceptions means that adverse scientific research reports, findings, regulatory proceedings, litigation, media attention or other publicity, whether or not accurate or with merit, could have a material adverse effect on the Corporation, the demand for the Corporation’s products, and the business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows of the Corporation. Further, adverse publicity reports or other media attention regarding the safety, efficacy and quality of medical cannabis in general, or the Corporation’s products specifically, or associating the consumption of cannabis with illness or other negative effects or events, could have such a material adverse effect. Such adverse publicity reports or other media attention could arise even if the adverse effects associated with such products resulted from consumers’ failure to consume such products appropriately or as directed. 23 Currency Fluctuations The Corporation’s revenues and expenses are expected to be primarily denominated in Canadian dollars, and therefore may be exposed to significant currency exchange fluctuations. Currency Fluctuations The Corporation’s revenues and expenses are expected to be primarily denominated in Canadian dollars, and therefore may be exposed to significant currency exchange fluctuations. Recent events in the global financial markets have been coupled with increased volatility in the currency markets. Fluctuations in the exchange rate between the U.S. dollar, and other foreign currencies and the Canadian dollar may have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s business, financial condition and operating results. dollar and the Canadian dollar may have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s business, financial condition and operating results. The Corporation may, in the future, establish a program to hedge a portion of its foreign currency exposure with the objective of minimizing the impact of adverse foreign currency exchange movements. However, even if the Corporation develops a hedging program, there can be no assurance that it will effectively mitigate currency risks. We may need to raise additional funds in the future that may not be available on acceptable terms or available at all. 26 We may need to raise additional funds in the future that may not be available on acceptable terms or available at all. Until we can generate enough cash flow from our existing operations, we will need to issue additional debt or equity securities in the future to fund our business plan, for potential investment acquisitions, or general corporate purposes. If we issue equity or convertible debt securities to raise additional funds, our existing stockholders will likely experience dilution, and the new equity or debt securities may have rights, preferences, and privileges senior to those of our existing stockholders. If we issue equity or convertible debt securities to raise additional funds, our existing stockholders may experience dilution, and the new equity or debt securities may have rights, preferences, and privileges senior to those of our existing stockholders. If we incur additional debt, it may increase our leverage relative to our earnings or to our equity capitalization, requiring us to pay additional interest expenses. We may not be able to obtain financing on favorable terms, or at all, in which case, we may not be able to develop or enhance our products, execute our business plan, take advantage of future opportunities, or respond to competitive pressures. We may be subject to liability claims for damages and other expenses not covered by insurance that could reduce our earnings and cash flows. Our business, profitability, and growth prospects could suffer if we pay damages or defense costs in connection with a liability claim that is outside the scope of any applicable insurance coverage. We have liability insurance and intend to maintain it, However there is no assurance that we will be able to continue to obtain insurance in amounts, or for a price, that will permit us to purchase desired amounts of insurance. Additionally, if our costs of insurance and claims increase, then our earnings could decline. Further, market rates for insurance premiums and deductibles have been steadily increasing, which may prevent us from being adequately insured. A product liability or negligence action in excess of insurance coverage could harm our profitability and liquidity. Insurance and contractual protections may not always cover lost revenue. We possess insurance and warranties from suppliers, and our subcontractors make contractual obligations to meet certain performance levels. We also attempt, where feasible, to pass risks we cannot control to our customers. The proceeds of such insurance, warranties, performance guarantees, and risk-sharing arrangements may not be adequate to cover lost revenue, increased expenses, or liquidated damages payments that may be required in the future. We currently carry customary insurance for business liability. Certain losses of a catastrophic nature, such as from floods, tornadoes, thunderstorms, and earthquakes, are uninsurable or not economically insurable. Such “Acts of God,” work stoppages, regulatory actions, or other causes, could interrupt operations and adversely affect our business. We Rely on Outside Consultants and Employees. We will rely on the experience of outside consultants and employees. In the event that one or more of these consultants or employees terminates employment with the Company, or becomes unavailable, suitable replacements will need to be retained, and there is no assurance that such employees or consultants could be identified under conditions favorable to us. 24 Risks Related to Our Financial Condition Dependence on financing and losses for the foreseeable future. Risks Related to Our Financial Condition Dependence on financing and losses for the foreseeable future.

Our independent registered public accounting firm has issued its audit opinion on our consolidated financial statements appearing in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including an explanatory paragraph as to substantial doubt with respect to our ability to continue as a going concern. The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, assuming we will continue as a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. For the fiscal year-ended December 31, 2022, our net loss was $8,531,020. As of December 31, 2022, we had an accumulated deficit of $94,695,339 and a working capital deficit of $17,065,140. As of December 31, 2021, we had an accumulated deficit of $12,925,920 and a working capital deficit of $13,010,703. These factors raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern which is dependent on our ability to raise the required additional capital or debt financing to meet short- and long-term operating requirements. We may also encounter business endeavors that require significant cash commitments or unanticipated problems or expenses that could result in a need for additional cash. If we raise additional funds through the issuance of equity or convertible debt securities, the percentage ownership of our current shareholders could be reduced, and such securities might have rights, preferences, or privileges senior to our common stock. Additional financing may not be available upon acceptable terms, or available at all. If adequate funds are not available on acceptable terms, we may not be able to take advantage of prospective business endeavors or opportunities, which could significantly and materially restrict our operations. If we are unable to obtain necessary capital, we may have to cease operations. For additional information, see Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations – “Going Concern.” Dependence on financing and losses for the foreseeable future As of December 31, 2022, we had current liabilities of $17,165,154 and current assets of $100,014.” Dependence on financing and losses for the foreseeable future As of December 31, 2021, we had current liabilities of $13,040,251 and current assets of $29,538. We had a working capital deficiency of $17,065,140. We had a working capital deficiency of $13,010,703. Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon raising capital from financing transactions. To stay in business, we will need to raise additional capital through public or private sales of our securities or debt financing. In the past, we have financed our operations by issuing secured and unsecured convertible debt and equity securities in private placements, in some cases with equity incentives for the investor in the form of warrants to purchase our common stock, and we have borrowed from related parties. We have sought, and will continue to seek, various sources of financing. There are no additional commitments from anyone to provide us with financing. We can provide no assurance as to whether our capital raising efforts will be successful or as to when, or if, we will be profitable in the future. Even if the Company achieves profitability, it may not be able to sustain such profitability. If we are unable to obtain financing or achieve and sustain profitability, we may have to suspend operations or sell assets, making us unable to execute our business plan. Failure to become and remain profitable may adversely affect the market price of our common stock and our ability to raise capital and continue operations. Our ability to generate positive cash flow is uncertain. 28 Our ability to generate positive cash flow is uncertain. To develop and expand our business, we will need to make significant up-front investments in our manufacturing capacity and incur research and development, sales and marketing, and general and administrative expenses. In addition, our growth will require a significant investment in working capital. Our business will require significant amounts of working capital to meet our project requirements and support our growth. We cannot provide any assurance that we will be able to raise the capital necessary to meet these requirements. If adequate funds are not available or are not available on satisfactory terms, we may be required to significantly curtail our operations and may not be able to fund our current production requirements, let alone fund expansion, take advantage of unanticipated acquisition opportunities, develop or enhance our products, and respond to competitive pressures. Any failure to obtain such additional financing could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, and financial condition. Because we may never have net income from our operations, our business may fail. We have no history of profitability from operations. There can be no assurance that we will ever operate profitably. Our success is significantly dependent on uncertain events, including successfully developing our products, establishing satisfactory manufacturing arrangements and processes, and distributing and selling our products. Our success is significantly dependent on uncertain events, including successful developing our products, establishing satisfactory manufacturing arrangements and processes, and distributing and selling our products. If we are unable to generate significant revenues from sales of our products, we will not be able to earn profits or continue operations. We can provide no assurance that we will generate any revenues or ever achieve profitability. If we are unsuccessful in addressing these risks, our business will fail, and investors may lose all of their investment in our Company. 25 Risks Related to Our Common Stock and Its Market Value We have limited capitalization and may require financing, which may not be available. Risks Related to Our Common Stock and Its Market Value We have limited capitalization and may require financing, which may not be available. We have limited capitalization, which increases our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions, limits our flexibility in planning for and reacting to changes in our business and industry, and may place us at a competitive disadvantage to competitors with sufficient capitalization. If we are unable to obtain sufficient financing on satisfactory terms and conditions, we will be forced to curtail or abandon our plans or operations. Our ability to obtain financing will depend upon a number of factors, many of which are beyond our control. A limited public trading market exists for our common stock, which makes it difficult for our stockholders to sell their common stock on the public markets. Any trading in our shares may have a significant effect on our stock prices Historically our common stock has traded on the OTC Markets under the symbol “CPMD. Any trading in our shares may have a significant effect on our stock prices. ” However, as of the filing of this Report, we are delinquent in our reporting obligations and our common stock has been relegated to being only traded on the expert market. We expect with our filing of this Report and filing all other due or delinquent reports, our common stock will resume trading on the OTC Markets. Until that time however, our shareholders will experience difficulty trading our common stock. Even when we were current in our reports, the trading activity of our common stock is volatile and may not develop or be sustained. As a result, any trading price of our common stock may not be an accurate indicator of the valuation of our common stock. Any trading in our shares could have a significant effect on our stock price. If a more liquid public market for our common stock does not develop, then investors may not be able to resell the shares of our common stock that they have purchased and may lose all of their investment. No assurance can be given that an active market will develop or that a stockholder will ever be able to liquidate its shares of common stock without considerable delay, if at all. Many brokerage firms may not be willing to affect transactions in the securities. Even if an investor finds a broker willing to affect a transaction in our securities, the combination of brokerage commissions, state transfer taxes, if any, and any other selling costs may exceed the selling price. Furthermore, our stock price may be impacted by factors that are unrelated or disproportionate to our operating performance. These market fluctuations, as well as general economic, political, and market conditions, such as recessions, interest rates, and international currency fluctuations, may adversely affect the market price and liquidity of our common stock. Our stock price has undergone a great deal of volatility, including a significant decrease over the past few years. 29 Our stock price has undergone a great deal of volatility, including a significant decrease over the past few years. The volatility may mean that, at times, our stockholders may be unable to resell their shares at or above the price at which they acquired them. From January 1, 2018 through the date of this report, the price per share of our common stock has ranged from a high of $0.68 to a low of $0.011. The price of our common stock has been, and may continue to be, highly volatile and subject to wide fluctuations. The market value of our common stock has declined in the past, due in part to our operating performance and to conversions of dilutive debt instruments that we have issued to fund operations. In the future, broad market and industry factors may decrease the market price of our common stock, regardless of our actual operating performance. Recent declines in the market price of our common stock have and could continue to affect our access to capital, and may, if they continue, impact our ability to continue operations at the current level. In addition, any continuation of the recent declines in the price of our common stock may curtail investment opportunities presented to us and negatively impact other aspects of our business, including our ability to fund our operations. As a result of any such declines, many stockholders have been or may become unable to resell their shares at or above the price at which they acquired them. 26 The volatility of the market price of our common stock could fluctuate widely in price in response to various factors, many of which are beyond our control, including the following: In addition, the securities markets have from time-to-time experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that are unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. The volatility of the market price of our common stock could fluctuate widely in price in response to various factors, many of which are beyond our control, including the following: 30 In addition, the securities markets have from time-to-time experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that are unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. These market fluctuations may also materially and adversely affect the market price of our common stock. 27 Our stock is categorized as a penny stock. Our stock is categorized as a penny stock. Trading of our stock may be restricted by the SEC’s penny stock regulations which may limit a stockholder’s ability to buy and sell our stock. Our stock is categorized as a “penny stock”, as that term is defined in SEC Rule 3a51-1, which generally provides that a “penny stock”, is any equity security that has a market price (as defined) less than U.S. $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions. Our securities are covered by the penny stock rules, including Rule 15g-9, which imposes additional sales practice requirements on broker-dealers who sell to persons other than established customers and accredited investors. The penny stock rules require a broker-dealer, prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from the rules, to deliver a standardized risk disclosure document in a form prepared by the SEC which provides information about penny stocks and the nature and level of risks in the penny stock market. The broker-dealer also must provide the customer with current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction, and monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the customer’s account. The bid and offer quotations, and the broker-dealer and salesperson compensation information, must be given to the customer orally or in writing prior to effecting the transaction and must be given to the customer in writing before or with the customer’s confirmation. In addition, the penny stock rules require that prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from these rules, the broker-dealer must make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and receive the purchaser’s written agreement to the transaction. These disclosure requirements may have the effect of reducing the level of trading activity in the secondary market for the stock that is subject to these penny stock rules. Consequently, these penny stock rules may affect the ability of broker-dealers to trade our securities and reduce the number of potential investors. We believe that the penny stock rules discourage investor interest in and limit the marketability of our common stock. According to SEC Release No. 34-29093, the market for “penny stocks” has suffered in recent years from patterns of fraud and abuse. Such patterns include: (1) control of the market for the security by one or a few broker-dealers that are often related to the promoter or issuer; (2) manipulation of prices through prearranged matching of purchases and sales and through false and misleading press releases; (3) boiler-room practices involving high-pressure sales tactics and unrealistic price projections by inexperienced salespersons; (4) excessive and undisclosed bid-ask differentials and markups by selling broker-dealers; and (5) the wholesale dumping of the same securities by promoters and broker-dealers after prices have been manipulated to a desired level, along with the resulting inevitable collapse of those prices and with consequent investor losses. The occurrence of these patterns or practices could increase the future volatility of our share price. FINRA sales practice requirements may also limit a stockholder’s ability to buy and sell our stock. In addition to the “penny stock” rules described above, FINRA has adopted rules that require that in recommending an investment to a customer, a broker-dealer must have reasonable grounds for believing that the investment is suitable for that customer. Prior to recommending speculative low-priced securities to their noninstitutional customers, broker-dealers must make reasonable efforts to obtain information about the customer’s financial status, tax status, investment objectives, and other information. Under interpretations of these rules, FINRA believes that there is a high probability that speculative low-priced securities will not be suitable for at least some customers. The FINRA requirements make it more difficult for broker-dealers to recommend that their customers buy our common stock, which may limit your ability to buy and sell our stock and have an adverse effect on the market for our shares. An investor’s ability to trade our common stock may be limited by trading volume. A consistently active trading market for our common stock may not occur on a national stock exchange or an automated quotation system. A limited trading volume may prevent our stockholders from selling shares at such times or in such amounts as they otherwise may desire. The lack of an active market for our common stock may impair investors’ ability to sell their shares at the time they wish to sell them or at a price that they consider reasonable, may reduce the fair market value of their shares and may impair our ability to raise capital to continue to fund operations by selling shares and may impair our ability to acquire additional intellectual property assets by using our shares as consideration. 28 We have not voluntarily implemented various corporate governance measures, in the absence of which, stockholders may have more limited protections against interested director transactions, conflicts of interest and similar matters. We have not voluntarily implemented various corporate governance measures, in the absence of which, stockholders may have more limited protections against interested director transactions, conflicts of interest and similar matters. Federal legislation, including the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, has resulted in the adoption of various corporate governance measures designed to promote the integrity of corporate management and the securities markets. Some of these measures have been adopted in response to legal requirements. Others have been adopted by companies in response to the requirements of national securities exchanges, on which their securities are listed. Among the corporate governance measures that are required under the rules of national securities exchanges and NASDAQ are those that address board of directors’ independence, audit committee oversight and the adoption of a code of ethics. While our board of directors has adopted a Code of Ethics and an Audit Committee Charter, we have not yet adopted any of the other corporate governance measures, and, since our securities are not currently listed on a national securities exchange or NASDAQ, we are not currently required to do so. In the event that our common stock becomes listed, we will be required to adopt these other corporate governance measures, and we intend to do so. It is possible that if we were to adopt some or all of these corporate governance measures, stockholders would benefit from somewhat greater assurances that internal corporate decisions were being made by disinterested directors and that policies had been implemented to define responsible conduct. For example, in the absence of audit, nominating and compensation committees comprised of at least a majority of independent directors, decisions concerning matters such as compensation packages to our senior officers and recommendations for director nominees may be made by a majority of directors who have an interest in the outcome of the matters being decided. Prospective investors should bear in mind our current lack of corporate governance measures in formulating their investment decisions. To date, we have not paid any cash dividends, and no cash dividends will be paid in the foreseeable future. 32 To date, we have not paid any cash dividends, and no cash dividends will be paid in the foreseeable future. We do not anticipate paying cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future and we may not have sufficient funds legally available to pay dividends. Even if the funds are legally available for distribution, we may nevertheless decide not to pay any dividends. Further, other classes of our preferred stock have priority to dividends meaning that even if we had sufficient funds to pay a dividend, there may not be sufficient funds to pay common stock holders any dividend, after fulfilling our obligations to holders of preferred stock. We currently intend to retain all earnings for our operations. If we fail to develop or maintain an effective system of internal controls, we may not be able to accurately to report our financial results or prevent financial fraud. As a result, current and potential stockholders could lose confidence in our financial reporting. We are subject to the risk that sometime in the future our independent registered public accounting firm could communicate to the board of directors that we have deficiencies in our internal control structure that they consider to be “significant deficiencies.” A “significant deficiency” is defined as a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal controls over financial reporting such that there is more than a remote likelihood that a material misstatement of the entity’s financial statements will not be prevented or detected by the entity’s internal controls. Effective internal controls are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and effectively prevent fraud. If we cannot provide reliable financial reports or prevent fraud, we could be subject to regulatory action or other litigation and our operating results could be harmed. We are required to document and test our internal control procedures to satisfy the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act,” or “SOX”), which requires our management to annually assess the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. 29 We currently are not an “accelerated filer” as defined in Rule 12b-2 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. We currently are not an “accelerated filer” as defined in Rule 12b-2 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.

Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“Section 404”) requires us to include an internal control report with our Annual Report on Form 10-K. That report must include management’s assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of the end of the fiscal year. This report must also include disclosure of any material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting that we have identified. As of December 31, 2022, the management of the Company assessed the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on SEC guidance on conducting such assessments and on the criteria for effective internal control over financial reporting established in Internal Control and Integrated Framework, issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”). Management concluded, during the year-ended December 31, 2022, that the Company’s internal controls and procedures were effective to detect the inappropriate application of U.S. GAAP rules. A material weakness in the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting may increase the chance of fraud and the loss of customers, reduce our ability to obtain financing, and require additional expenditures to comply with these requirements. Any of these consequences could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. For additional information, see Item 9A – Controls and Procedures. It may be time-consuming, difficult, and costly for us to develop and implement the internal controls and reporting procedures required by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. We may need to hire additional financial reporting, internal controls, and other finance personnel in order to develop and implement appropriate internal controls and reporting procedures. If we are unable to comply with the internal controls requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, then we may not be able to obtain the independent accountant certifications required by such act, which may preclude us from keeping our filings with the SEC current. If we are unable to maintain the adequacy of our internal controls, as those standards are modified, supplemented, or amended from time to time, we may not be able to ensure that we may conclude on an ongoing basis that we have effective internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404. Failure to achieve and maintain an effective internal control environment could cause us to face regulatory action and cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, either of which could adversely affect the value of our common stock. Because our current directors, executive officers, and preferred stockholders beneficially 6.8% of our fully diluted common stock, they can exert significant control over our business and affairs and have actual or potential interests that may depart from those of subscribers in our private placements. Our current directors and our executive officers beneficially own or control approximately 6. Our current directors and our executive officers beneficially own or control approximately13% of our issued and outstanding shares of common stock as of December 31, 2021. 8% of our fully diluted shares of common stock as of June 30, 2023. Additionally, the holdings of our directors, and executive officers, and preferred stockholders may increase in the future upon vesting or other maturation of exercise rights under any of the restricted stock grants, options, or warrants they may hold or in the future be granted, or if they otherwise acquire additional shares of our common stock. The interests of such persons may differ from the interests of our other stockholders. As a result, in addition to their board seats and offices, such persons, irrespective of how the Company’s other stockholders vote, may have significant influence over and may control corporate actions requiring stockholder approval, including the following actions: Such persons' stock ownership may discourage a potential acquirer from making a tender offer or otherwise attempting to obtain control of the Company, which in turn could reduce our stock price or prevent our stockholders from realizing a premium ove